• We consider the problem of local tunneling into cuprate superconductors, combining model based calculations for the superconducting order parameter with wavefunction information obtained from first principles electronic structure. For some time it has been proposed that scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) spectra do not reflect the properties of the superconducting layer in the CuO$_2$ plane directly beneath the STM tip, but rather a weighted sum of spatially proximate states determined by the details of the tunneling process. These "filter" ideas have been countered with the argument that similar conductance patterns have been seen around impurities and charge ordered states in systems with atomically quite different barrier layers. Here we use a recently developed Wannier function based method to calculate topographies, spectra, conductance maps and normalized conductance maps close to impurities. We find that it is the local planar Cu $d_{x^2-y^2}$ Wannier function, qualitatively similar for many systems, that controls the form of the tunneling spectrum and the spatial patterns near perturbations. We explain how, despite the fact that STM observables depend on the materials-specific details of the tunneling process and setup parameters, there is an overall universality in the qualitative features of conductance spectra. In particular, we discuss why STM results on Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_8$ and Ca$_{2-x}$Na$_x$CuO$_2$Cl$_2$ are essentially identical.
  • Since the discovery of iron-based superconductors, a number of theories have been put forward to explain the qualitative origin of pairing, but there have been few attempts to make quantitative, material-specific comparisons to experimental results. The spin-fluctuation theory of electronic pairing, based on first-principles electronic structure calculations, makes predictions for the superconducting gap. Within the same framework, the surface wave functions may also be calculated, allowing, e.g., for detailed comparisons between theoretical results and measured scanning tunneling topographs and spectra. Here we present such a comparison between theory and experiment on the Fe-based superconductor LiFeAs. Results for the homogeneous surface as well as impurity states are presented as a benchmark test of the theory. For the homogeneous system, we argue that the maxima of topographic image intensity may be located at positions above either the As or Li atoms, depending on tip height and the setpoint current of the measurement. We further report the experimental observation of transitions between As and Li-registered lattices as functions of both tip height and setpoint bias, in agreement with this prediction. Next, we give a detailed comparison between the simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images of transition-metal defects with experiment. Finally, we discuss possible extensions of the current framework to obtain a theory with true predictive power for scanning tunneling microscopy in Fe-based systems.
  • Bulk rutile RuO$_2$ has long been considered a Pauli paramagnet. Here we report that RuO$_2$ exhibits a hitherto undetected lattice distortion below approximately 900 K. The distortion is accompanied by antiferromagnetic order up to at least 300 K with a small room temperature magnetic moment of approximately 0.05 $\mu_B$ as evidenced by polarized neutron diffraction. Density functional theory plus $U$ (DFT+$U$) calculations indicate that antiferromagnetism is favored even for small values of the Hubbard $U$ of the order of 1 eV. The antiferromagnetism may be traced to a Fermi surface instability, lifting the band degeneracy imposed by the rutile crystal field. The combination of high N\'eel temperature and small itinerant moments make RuO$_2$ unique among ruthenate compounds and among oxide materials in general.
  • We generalize the multiband typical medium dynamical cluster approximation and the formalism introduced by Blackman, Esterling and Berk so that it can deal with localization in multiband disordered systems with both diagonal and off-diagonal disorder with complicated potentials. We also introduce a new ansatz for the angle resolved typical density of states that greatly improves the numerical stability of the method while preserving the independence of scattering events at different frequencies. Starting from the first-principles effective Hamiltonian, we apply this method to the diluted magnetic semiconductor Ga$_{1-x}$Mn$_x$N, and find the impurity band is completely localized for Mn concentrations $x<0.03$ while for $0.03 <x<0.10$ the impurity band has delocalized states but the chemical potential resides at or above the mobility edge. So, the system is always insulating within the experimental compositional limit ($x\approx 0.10$) due to Anderson localization. However, for $0.03 <x<0.10$ hole doping could make the system metallic allowing double exchange mediated, or enhanced, ferromagnetism. The developed method is expected to have a large impact on first-principles studies of Anderson localization.
  • In conventional s-wave superconductors, only magnetic impurities exhibit impurity bound states, whereas for an s+- order parameter they can occur for both magnetic and non-magnetic impurities. Impurity bound states in superconductors can thus provide important insight into the order parameter. Here, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study of native and engineered iron-site defects in LiFeAs. Detailed comparison of tunneling spectra measured on impurities with spin fluctuation theory reveals a continuous evolution from negligible impurity bound state features for weaker scattering potential to clearly detectable states for somewhat stronger scattering potentials. All bound states for these intermediate strength potentials are pinned at or close to the gap edge of the smaller gap, a phenomenon that we explain and ascribe to multi-orbital physics.
  • We report a combined study of the spin resonances and superconducting gaps for underdoped ($T_c=19$ K), optimally doped ($T_c=25$ K), and overdoped ($T_c=19$ K) Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$Co$_x$)$_2$As$_2$ single crystals with inelastic neutron scattering and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We find a quasi two dimensional spin resonance whose energy scales with the superconducting gap in all three compounds. In addition, anisotropic low energy spin excitation enhancements in the superconducting state have been deduced and characterized for the under and optimally doped compounds. Our data suggest that the quasi two dimensional spin resonance is a spin exciton that corresponds to the spin singlet-triplet excitations of the itinerant electrons. However, the intensity enhancements of the anisotropic spin excitations are dominated by the out-of-plane spin excitations of the ordered moments due to the suppression of damping in the superconducting state. Hence we offer a new interpretation of the double energy scales differing from previous interpretations based on anisotropic superconducting energy gaps, and systematically explain the doping-dependent trend across the phase diagram.
  • Mono- and multilayer FeSe thin films grown on SrTiO$_\mathrm{3}$ and BiTiO$_\mathrm{3}$ substrates exhibit a greatly enhanced superconductivity over that found in bulk FeSe. A number of proposals have been advanced for the mechanism of this enhancement. One possibility is the introduction of a cross-interface electron-phonon ($e$-$ph$) interaction between the FeSe electrons and oxygen phonons in the substrates that is peaked in the forward scattering (small ${\bf q}$) direction due to the two-dimensional nature of the interface system. Motivated by this, we explore the consequences of such an interaction on the superconducting state and electronic structure of a two-dimensional system using Migdal-Eliashberg theory. This interaction produces not only deviations from the expectations of conventional phonon-mediated pairing but also replica structures in the spectral function and density of states, as probed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, and quasi-particle interference imaging. We also discuss the applicability of Migdal-Eliashberg theory for a situation where the \ep interaction is peaked at small momentum transfer and in the FeSe/STO system.
  • We report elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb. Measurements were performed on a large, TC=434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of delta~0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (H K 2n), and ii) a broad, non-dispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H$\,$K$\,$2$n$+1). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave theory calculations, and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. The results show that the influence of the interstitial Mn on the magnetic state in this system is more important than previously understood.
  • We apply a recently developed method combining first principles based Wannier functions with solutions to the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations to the problem of interpreting STM data in cuprate superconductors. We show that the observed images of Zn on the surface of Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_8$ can only be understood by accounting for the tails of the Cu Wannier functions, which include significant weight on apical O sites in neighboring unit cells. This calculation thus puts earlier crude "filter" theories on a microscopic foundation and solves a long standing puzzle. We then study quasiparticle interference phenomena induced by out-of-plane weak potential scatterers, and show how patterns long observed in cuprates can be understood in terms of the interference of Wannier functions above the surface. Our results show excellent agreement with experiment and enable a better understanding of novel phenomena in the cuprates via STM imaging.
  • We consider the effect of glide-plane symmetry of the Fe-pnictogen/chalcogen layer in Fe-based superconductors on pairing in spin fluctuation models. Recent theories have proposed that so-called $\eta$-pairing states with nonzero total momentum can be realized and possess exotic properties such as odd parity spin singlet symmetry and time-reversal symmetry breaking. Here we show that $\eta$ pairing is inevitable when there is orbital weight at the Fermi level from orbitals with even and odd mirror reflection symmetry in $z$; however, by explicit calculation, we conclude that the gap function that appears in observable quantities is identical to that found in earlier, 1 Fe per unit cell pseudocrystal momentum calculations.
  • We propose a simple method of calculating inhomogeneous, atomic-scale phenomena in superconductors which makes use of the wave function information traditionally discarded in the construction of tight-binding models used in the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. The method uses symmetry based first principles Wannier functions to visualize the effects of superconducting pairing on the distribution of electronic states over atoms within a crystal unit cell. Local symmetries lower than the global lattice symmetry can thus be exhibited as well, rendering theoretical comparisons with scanning tunneling spectroscopy data much more useful. As a simple example, we discuss the geometric dimer states observed near defects in superconducting FeSe.
  • For a quantum state, or classical harmonic normal mode, of a system of spatial periodicity "R", Bloch character is encoded in a wavevector "K". One can ask whether this state has partial Bloch character "k" corresponding to a finer scale of periodicity "r". Answering this is called "unfolding." A theorem is proven that yields a mathematically clear prescription for unfolding, by examining translational properties of the state, requiring no "reference states" or basis functions with the finer periodicity (r,k). A question then arises, how should one assign partial Bloch character to a state of a finite system? A slab, finite in one direction, is used as the example. Perpendicular components k_z of the wavevector are not explicitly defined, but may be hidden in the state (and eigenvector |i>.) A prescription for extracting k_z is offered and tested. An idealized silicon (111) surface is used as the example. Slab-unfolding reveals surface-localized states and resonances which were not evident from dispersion curves alone.
  • Combining thermodynamic measurements with theoretical density functional and thermodynamic calculations we demonstrate that the honeycomb lattice iridates A2IrO3 (A = Na, Li) are magnetically ordered Mott insulators where the magnetism of the effective spin-orbital S = 1/2 moments can be captured by a Heisenberg-Kitaev (HK) model with Heisenberg interactions beyond nearest-neighbor exchange. Experimentally, we observe an increase of the Curie-Weiss temperature from \theta = -125 K for Na2IrO3 to \theta = -33 K for Li2IrO3, while the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature remains roughly the same T_N = 15 K for both materials. Using finite-temperature functional renormalization group calculations we show that this evolution of \theta, T_N, the frustration parameter f = \theta/T_N, and the zig-zag magnetic ordering structure suggested for both materials by density functional theory can be captured within this extended HK model. Combining our experimental and theoretical results, we estimate that Na2IrO3 is deep in the magnetically ordered regime of the HK model (\alpha \approx 0.25), while Li2IrO3 appears to be close to a spin-liquid regime (0.6 < \alpha < 0.7).
  • We report a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the magnetic structure of the honeycomb lattice magnet Na$_2$IrO$_3$, a strong candidate for a realization of a gapless spin-liquid. Using resonant x-ray magnetic scattering at the Ir L$_3$-edge, we find 3D long range antiferromagnetic order below T$_N$=13.3 K. From the azimuthal dependence of the magnetic Bragg peak, the ordered moment is determined to be predominantly along the {\it a}-axis. Combining the experimental data with first principles calculations, we propose that the most likely spin structure is a novel "zig-zag" structure.