• We investigate the carrier-envelope phase and intensity dependence of the longitudinal momentum distribution of photoelectrons resulting from above-threshold ionization of argon by few-cycle laser pulses. The intensity of the pulses with a center wavelength of 750\,nm is varied in a range between $0.7 \times 10^{14}$ and $\unit[5.5 \times 10^{14}]{W/cm^2}$. Our measurements reveal a prominent maximum in the carrier-envelope phase-dependent asymmetry at photoelectron energies of 2\,$U_\mathrm{P}$ ($U_\mathrm{P}$ being the ponderomotive potential), that is persistent over the entire intensity range. Further local maxima are observed at 0.3 and 0.8\,$U_\mathrm{P}$. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical results obtained by solving the three-dimensional time-dependent Schr\"{o}dinger equation (3D TDSE). We show that for few-cycle pulses, the carrier-envelope phase-dependent asymmetry amplitude provides a reliable measure for the peak intensity on target. Moreover, the measured asymmetry amplitude exhibits an intensity-dependent interference structure at low photoelectron energy, which could be used to benchmark model potentials for complex atoms.
  • Recently two emerging areas of research, attosecond and nanoscale physics, have started to come together. Attosecond physics deals with phenomena occurring when ultrashort laser pulses, with duration on the femto- and sub-femtosecond time scales, interact with atoms, molecules or solids. The laser-induced electron dynamics occurs natively on a timescale down to a few hundred or even tens of attoseconds, which is comparable with the optical field. On the other hand, the second branch involves the manipulation and engineering of mesoscopic systems, such as solids, metals and dielectrics, with nanometric precision. Although nano-engineering is a vast and well-established research field on its own, the merger with intense laser physics is relatively recent. In this article we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical overview of physics that takes place when short and intense laser pulses interact with nanosystems, such as metallic and dielectric nanostructures. In particular we elucidate how the spatially inhomogeneous laser induced fields at a nanometer scale modify the laser-driven electron dynamics. Consequently, this has important impact on pivotal processes such as ATI and HHG. The deep understanding of the coupled dynamics between these spatially inhomogeneous fields and matter configures a promising way to new avenues of research and applications. Thanks to the maturity that attosecond physics has reached, together with the tremendous advance in material engineering and manipulation techniques, the age of atto-nano physics has begun, but it is in the initial stage. We present thus some of the open questions, challenges and prospects for experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions, as well as experiments aimed at characterizing the induced fields and the unique electron dynamics initiated by them with high temporal and spatial resolution.
  • The generation of highly charged Xe$^{q+}$ ions up to {$q=24$} is observed in Xe clusters embedded in helium nanodroplets and exposed to intense femtosecond laser pulses ($\lambda$=800 nm). Laser intensity resolved measurements show that the high-$q$ ion generation starts at an unexpectedly low threshold intensity of about {10$^{14}$ W/cm$^{2}$}. Above threshold, the Xe ion charge spectrum saturates quickly and changes only weakly for higher laser intensities. Good agreement between these observations and a molecular dynamics analysis allows us to identify the mechanisms responsible for the highly charged ion production and the surprising intensity threshold behavior of the ionization process.