• At the end of March 2015 the onboard software configuration of the AGILE satellite was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the anticoincidence shield for the minicalorimeter instrument. The motivation for such a change was the understanding that the dead time induced by the anticoincidence prevented the detection of a large fraction of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs). The configuration change was highly successful resulting in an increase of one order of magnitude in TGF detection rate. As expected, the largest fraction of the new events has short duration ($< 100 \mathrm {\mu s}$), and part of them has simultaneous association with lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). The new configuration provides the largest TGF detection rate surface density (TGFs/$\mathrm{km^2}$/year) to date, opening prospects for improved correlation studies with lightning and atmospheric parameters on short spatial and temporal scales along the equatorial region.
  • The source fluence distribution of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) has been extensively discussed in recent years, but few have considered how the TGF fluence distribution at the source, as estimated from satellite measurements, depends on the distance from satellite foot point and assumed production altitude. As the absorption of the TGF photons increases significantly with lower source altitude and larger distance between the source and the observing satellite, these might be important factors. We have addressed the issue by using the tropopause pressure distribution as an approximation of the TGF production altitude distribution and World Wide Lightning Location Network spheric measurements to determine the distance. The study is made possible by the increased number of Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) TGFs found in the second catalog of the RHESSI data. One find is that the TGF/lightning ratio for the tropics probably has an annual variability due to an annual variability in the Dobson-Brewer circulation. The main result is an indication that the altitude distribution and distance should be considered when investigating the source fluence distribution of TGFs, as this leads to a softening of the inferred distribution of source brightness.
  • Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are the most energetic photon phenomenon occurring naturally on Earth. An outstanding question is as follows: Are these flashes just a rare exotic phenomenon or are they an intrinsic part of lightning discharges and therefore occurring more frequently than previously thought? All measurements of TGFs so far have been limited by the dynamic range and sensitivity of spaceborne instruments. In this paper we show that there is a new population of weak TGFs that has not been identified by search algorithms. We use the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) to identify lightning that occurred in 2006 and 2012 within the 800 km field of view of Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). By superposing 740,210 100 ms RHESSI data intervals, centered at the time of the WWLLN detected lightning, we identify at least 141 and probably as many as 191 weak TGFs that were not part of the second RHESSI data catalogue. This supports the suggestion that the global TGF production rate is larger than previously reported.
  • We present three terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) observed over the Mediterranean basin by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager (RHESSI) satellite. Since the occurrence of these events in the Mediterranean region is quite rare, the characterisation of the events was optimised by combining different approaches in order to better define the cloud of origin. The TGFs on 7 November 2004 and 16 October 2006 came from clouds with cloud top higher than 10-12 km where often a strong penetration into the stratosphere is found. This kind of cloud is usually associated with heavy precipitation and intense lightning activity. Nevertheless, the analysis of the cloud type based on satellite retrievals shows that the TGF on 27 May 2004 was produced by an unusual shallow convection. This result appears to be supported by the model simulation of the particle distribution and phase in the upper troposphere. The TGF on 7 November 2004 is among the brightest ever measured by RHESSI. The analysis of the energy spectrum of this event is consistent with a production altitude $\leq$12 km, which is in the upper part of the cloud, as found by the meteorological analysis of the TGF-producing thunderstorm. This event must be unusually bright at the source in order to produce such a strong signal in RHESSI. We estimate that this TGF must contain $\sim$3x10$\rm ^{18}$ initial photons with energy $>$1 MeV. This is 1 order of magnitude brighter than earlier estimations of an average RHESSI TGF.
  • Discharge experiments were carried out at the Eindhoven University of Technology in 2013. The experimental setup was designed to search for electrons produced in meter-scale sparks using a 1 MV Marx generator. Negative voltage was applied to the high voltage (HV) electrode. Five thin (1 mm) plastic detectors (5 $\rm cm^2$ each) were distributed in various configurations close to the spark gap. Earlier studies have shown (for HV negative) that X-rays are produced when a cloud of streamers is developed 30-60 cm from the negative electrode. This indicates that the electrons producing the X-rays are also accelerated at this location, that could be in the strong electric field from counterstreamers of opposite polarity. Comparing our measurements with modeling results, we find that $\sim$300 keV electrons produced about 30-60 cm from the negative electrode are the most likely source of our measurements. A statistical analysis of expected detection of photon bursts by these fiber detectors indicates that only 20%-45% of the detected bursts could be from soft ($\sim$10 keV) photons, which further supports that the majority of detected bursts are produced by relativistic electrons.
  • This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of high-energy radiation from thunderstorms and lightning. For a summary, we refer to the paper.