• We determine the local metallicity of the ionized gas for more than $9.2\times 10^5$ star forming regions (spaxels) located in 1023 nearby galaxies included in the SDSS-IV MaNGA IFU survey. We use the dust extinction derived from the Balmer decrement and stellar template fitting in each spaxel to estimate the local gas and stellar mass densities, respectively. We also use the measured rotation curves to determine the local escape velocity ($\mathrm{V_{esc}}$). We have then analyze the relationships between the local metallicity and both the local gas fraction ($\mu$) and $\mathrm{V_{esc}}$. We find that metallicity decreases with both increasing $\mu$ and decreasing $\mathrm{V_{esc}}$. By examining the residuals in these relations we show that the gas fraction plays a more primary role in the local chemical enrichment than $\mathrm{V_{esc}}$. We show that the gas-regulator model of chemical evolution provides a reasonable explanation of the metallicity on local scales. The best-fit parameters for this model are consistent with metal loss caused by momentum-driven galactic outflows. We also argue that both the gas fraction and local escape velocity are connected to the local stellar surface density, which in turn is a tracer of the epoch at which the dominant local stellar population formed
  • We present the integrated stellar mass-metallicity relation (MZR) for more than 1700 galaxies included in the integral field area SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. The spatially resolved data allow us to determine the metallicity at the same physical scale (effective radius in arcsecs, $\mathrm{R_{eff}}$ ) using a heterogeneous set of ten abundance calibrators. Besides scale factors, the shape of the MZR is similar for all calibrators, consistent with those reported previously using single-fiber and integral field spectroscopy. We compare the residuals of this relation against the star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR). We do not find a strong secondary relation of the MZR with either SFR or the sSFR for any of the calibrators, in contrast with previous single-fiber spectroscopic studies. Our results agree with an scenario in which metal enrichment happens at local scales, with global outflows playing a secondary role in shaping the chemistry of galaxies and cold-gas inflows regulating the stellar formation.
  • We have mapped the superwind/halo region of the nearby starburst galaxy M82 in the mid-infrared with $Spitzer-IRS$. The spectral regions covered include the H$_2 S(1)-S(3)$, [NeII], [NeIII] emission lines and PAH features. We estimate the total warm H$_2$ mass and the kinetic energy of the outflowing warm molecular gas to be between $M_{warm}\sim5-17\times10^6$ M$_{\odot}$ and $E_{K}\sim6-20\times10^{53}$ erg. Using the ratios of the 6.2, 7.7 and 11.3 micron PAH features in the IRS spectra, we are able to estimate the average size and ionization state of the small grains in the superwind. There are large variations in the PAH flux ratios throughout the outflow. The 11.3/7.7 and the 6.2/7.7 PAH ratios both vary by more than a factor of five across the wind region. The Northern part of the wind has a significant population of PAH's with smaller 6.2/7.7 ratios than either the starburst disk or the Southern wind, indicating that on average, PAH emitters are larger and more ionized. The warm molecular gas to PAH flux ratios (H$_2/PAH$) are enhanced in the outflow by factors of 10-100 as compared to the starburst disk. This enhancement in the H$_2/PAH$ ratio does not seem to follow the ionization of the atomic gas (as measured with the [NeIII]/[NeII] line flux ratio) in the outflow. This suggests that much of the warm H$_2$ in the outflow is excited by shocks. The observed H$_2$ line intensities can be reproduced with low velocity shocks ($v < 40$ km s$^{-1}$) driven into moderately dense molecular gas ($10^2 <n_H < 10^4$ cm$^{-3}$) entrained in the outflow.
  • We present the results of an analysis of Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey multi-band (g,r,i,z,y) images of a sample of 698 low-redshift disk galaxies that span broad ranges in stellar mass, star-formation rate, and bulge/disk ratio. We use population synthesis SED fitting techniques to explore the radial distribution of the light, color, surface mass density, mass/light ratio, and age of the stellar populations. We characterize the structure and stellar content of the galaxy disks out to radii of about twice Petrosian r90, beyond which the halo light becomes significant. We measure normalized radial profiles for sub-samples of galaxies in three bins each of stellar mass and concentration. We also fit radial profiles to each galaxy. The majority of galaxies have down-bending radial surface brightness profiles in the bluer bands with a break radius at roughly r90. However, they typically show single unbroken exponentials in the reddest bands and in the stellar surface mass density. We find that the mass/light ratio and stellar age radial profiles have a characteristic "U-shape". There is a good correlation between the amplitude of the down-bend in the surface brightness profile and the rate of the increase in the M/L ratio in the outer disk. As we move from late- to early-type galaxies, the amplitude of the down-bend and the radial gradient in M/L both decrease. Our results imply a combination of stellar radial migration and suppression of recent star formation can account for the stellar populations of the outer disk.
  • We present the selection and classification of over a thousand ultraviolet (UV) variable sources discovered in ~ 40 deg^2 of GALEX Time Domain Survey (TDS) NUV images observed with a cadence of 2 days and a baseline of observations of ~ 3 years. The GALEX TDS fields were designed to be in spatial and temporal coordination with the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, which provides deep optical imaging and simultaneous optical transient detections via image differencing. We characterize the GALEX photometric errors empirically as a function of mean magnitude, and select sources that vary at the 5\sigma level in at least one epoch. We measure the statistical properties of the UV variability, including the structure function on timescales of days and years. We report classifications for the GALEX TDS sample using a combination of optical host colors and morphology, UV light curve characteristics, and matches to archival X-ray, and spectroscopy catalogs. We classify 62% of the sources as active galaxies (358 quasars and 305 active galactic nuclei), and 10% as variable stars (including 37 RR Lyrae, 53 M dwarf flare stars, and 2 cataclysmic variables). The remaining unclassified sources include UV-bright extragalactic transients, two of which have been spectroscopically confirmed to be a young core-collapse supernova and a flare from the tidal disruption of a star by dormant supermassive black hole. We calculate a surface density for variable sources in the UV with NUV < 23 mag and |\Delta m| > 0.2 mag of ~ 8.0, 7.7, and 1.8 deg^-2 for quasars, AGNs, and RR Lyrae stars, respectively. We also calculate a surface density rate in the UV for transient sources, using the effective survey time at the cadence appropriate to each class, of ~ 15 and 52 deg^-2 yr^-1 for M dwarfs and extragalactic transients, respectively. (Abridged.)
  • The flare of radiation from the tidal disruption and accretion of a star can be used as a marker for supermassive black holes that otherwise lie dormant and undetected in the centres of distant galaxies. Previous candidate flares have had declining light curves in good agreement with expectations, but with poor constraints on the time of disruption and the type of star disrupted, because the rising emission was not observed. Recently, two `relativistic' candidate tidal disruption events were discovered, each of whose extreme X-ray luminosity and synchrotron radio emission were interpreted as the onset of emission from a relativistic jet. Here we report the discovery of a luminous ultraviolet-optical flare from the nuclear region of an inactive galaxy at a redshift of 0.1696. The observed continuum is cooler than expected for a simple accreting debris disk, but the well-sampled rise and decline of its light curve follows the predicted mass accretion rate, and can be modelled to determine the time of disruption to an accuracy of two days. The black hole has a mass of about 2 million solar masses, modulo a factor dependent on the mass and radius of the star disrupted. On the basis of the spectroscopic signature of ionized helium from the unbound debris, we determine that the disrupted star was a helium-rich stellar core.
  • We have used the European VLBI Network (EVN) to observe a sample of Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs), nearby (z < 0.3) galaxies with properties similar to the more distant Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs). The study of LBGs may help define the feed-back relationship between black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies. Previous VLA observations have shown that the kpc-scale radio emission from LBAs is dominated by starbursts. The main targets of this VLBI experiment were selected because they possessed emission-line properties between starbursts and Type 2 (obscured) AGN. Eight targets (three star-forming LBAs, four composite LBAs, and one Type 1 AGN) were observed at 5 GHz, four of which were also observed at 1.7 GHz. One star-forming LBA and one composite LBA were detected above 5 \sigma at 1.7 GHz (only), while the AGN was detected at 5 GHz. In both LBAs, the radio luminosity (LR) exceeds that expected from supernovae (remnants) based on a comparison with Arp220, Arp229A and Mrk273, by factors of 2 - 8. The composite LBA exhibits a compact core emitting around 10% of the VLA flux density. The high Tb of 3.5E7 K and excess core L_R with respect to the L_R/L_X relation of radio-quiet AGN indicate that this LBA possesses an obscured AGN (MBH ~ E5-E7 M_sun). While weak AGN may co-exist with the starbursts as shown in at least one of the LBAs, their contribution to the total radio flux is fairly minimal. Our results show that the detection of such weak AGN presents a challenge at radio, X-ray and optical emission-line wavelengths at z ~ 0.2, indicating the great difficulties that need to be overcome in order to study similar processes at high redshift when these types of galaxies were common.
  • D. Schlegel, F. Abdalla, T. Abraham, C. Ahn, C. Allende Prieto, J. Annis, E. Aubourg, M. Azzaro, S. Bailey. C. Baltay, C. Baugh, C. Bebek, S. Becerril, M. Blanton, A. Bolton, B. Bromley, R. Cahn, P.-H. Carton, J. L. Cervantes-Cota, Y. Chu, M. Cortes, K. Dawson, A. Dey, M. Dickinson, H. T. Diehl, P. Doel, A. Ealet, J. Edelstein, D. Eppelle, S. Escoffier, A. Evrard, L. Faccioli, C. Frenk, M. Geha, D. Gerdes, P. Gondolo, A. Gonzalez-Arroyo, B. Grossan, T. Heckman, H. Heetderks, S. Ho, K. Honscheid, D. Huterer, O. Ilbert, I. Ivans, P. Jelinsky, Y. Jing, D. Joyce, R. Kennedy, S. Kent, D. Kieda, A. Kim, C. Kim, J.-P. Kneib, X. Kong, A. Kosowsky, K. Krishnan, O. Lahav, M. Lampton, S. LeBohec, V. Le Brun, M. Levi, C. Li, M. Liang, H. Lim, W. Lin, E. Linder, W. Lorenzon, A. de la Macorra, Ch. Magneville, R. Malina, C. Marinoni, V. Martinez, S. Majewski, T. Matheson, R. McCloskey, P. McDonald, T. McKay, J. McMahon, B. Menard, J. Miralda-Escude, M. Modjaz, A. Montero-Dorta, I. Morales, N. Mostek, J. Newman, R. Nichol, P. Nugent, K. Olsen, N. Padmanabhan, N. Palanque-Delabrouille, I. Park, J. Peacock, W. Percival, S. Perlmutter, C. Peroux, P. Petitjean, F. Prada, E. Prieto, J. Prochaska, K. Reil, C. Rockosi, N. Roe, E. Rollinde, A. Roodman, N. Ross, G. Rudnick, V. Ruhlmann-Kleider, J. Sanchez, D. Sawyer, C. Schimd, M. Schubnell, R. Scoccimaro, U. Seljak, H. Seo, E. Sheldon, M. Sholl, R. Shulte-Ladbeck, A. Slosar, D. S. Smith, G. Smoot, W. Springer, A. Stril, A. S. Szalay, C. Tao, G. Tarle, E. Taylor, A. Tilquin, J. Tinker, F. Valdes, J. Wang, T. Wang, B. A. Weaver, D. Weinberg, M. White, M. Wood-Vasey, J. Yang, X. Yang. Ch. Yeche, N. Zakamska, A. Zentner, C. Zhai, P. Zhang
    June 9, 2011 astro-ph.IM
    BigBOSS is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey over 14,000 square degrees. It has been conditionally accepted by NOAO in response to a call for major new instrumentation and a high-impact science program for the 4-m Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak. The BigBOSS instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking 5000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 340 nm to 1060 nm, with a resolution R = 3000-4800. Using data from imaging surveys that are already underway, spectroscopic targets are selected that trace the underlying dark matter distribution. In particular, targets include luminous red galaxies (LRGs) up to z = 1.0, extending the BOSS LRG survey in both redshift and survey area. To probe the universe out to even higher redshift, BigBOSS will target bright [OII] emission line galaxies (ELGs) up to z = 1.7. In total, 20 million galaxy redshifts are obtained to measure the BAO feature, trace the matter power spectrum at smaller scales, and detect redshift space distortions. BigBOSS will provide additional constraints on early dark energy and on the curvature of the universe by measuring the Ly-alpha forest in the spectra of over 600,000 2.2 < z < 3.5 quasars. BigBOSS galaxy BAO measurements combined with an analysis of the broadband power, including the Ly-alpha forest in BigBOSS quasar spectra, achieves a FOM of 395 with Planck plus Stage III priors. This FOM is based on conservative assumptions for the analysis of broad band power (kmax = 0.15), and could grow to over 600 if current work allows us to push the analysis to higher wave numbers (kmax = 0.3). BigBOSS will also place constraints on theories of modified gravity and inflation, and will measure the sum of neutrino masses to 0.024 eV accuracy.
  • The "Extreme starbursts in the local universe" workshop was held at the Insituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia in Granada, Spain on 21-25 June 2010. Bearing in mind the advent of a new generation of facilities such as JWST, Herschel, ALMA, eVLA and eMerlin, the aim of the workshop was to bring together observers and theorists to review the latest results. The purpose of the workshop was to address the following issues: what are the main modes of triggering extreme starbursts in the local Universe? How efficiently are stars formed in extreme starbursts? What are the star formation histories of local starburst galaxies? How well do the theoretical simulations model the observations? What can we learn about starbursts in the distant Universe through studies of their local counterparts? How important is the role of extreme starbursts in the hierarchical assembly of galaxies? How are extreme starbursts related to the triggering of AGN in the nuclei of galaxies? Overall, 41 talks and 4 posters with their corresponding 10 minutes short talks were presented during the workshop. In addition, the workshop was designed with emphasis on discussions, and therefore, there were 6 discussion sessions of up to one hour during the workshop. Here is presented a summary of the purposes of the workshop as well as a compilation of the abstracts corresponding to each of the presentations. The summary and conclusions of the workshop along with a description of the future prospects by Sylvain Veilleux can be found in the last section of this document. A photo of the assistants is included.
  • We investigate the use of MIR PAH bands, continuum and emission lines as probes of star-formation and AGN activity in a sample of 100 'normal' and local (z~0.1) emission-line galaxies. The MIR spectra were obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) as part of the Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey (SSGSS) which includes multi-wavelength photometry from the UV to the FIR and optical spectroscopy. The continuum and features were extracted using PAHFIT (Smith et al. 2007), a decomposition code which we find to yield PAH equivalent widths up to ~30 times larger than the commonly used spline methods. Despite the lack of extreme objects in our sample (such as strong AGNs, low metallicity galaxies or ULIRGs), we find significant variations in PAH, continuum and emission line properties and systematic trends between these MIR properties and optically derived physical properties such as age, metallicity and radiation field hardness. We revisit the diagnostic diagram relating PAH equivalent widths and [Ne II]12.8micrometers/[O IV]25.9micrometers line ratios and find it to be in much better agreement with the standard optical star-formation/AGN classification than when spline decompositions are used, while also potentially revealing obscured AGNs. The luminosity of individual PAH components, of the continuum, and with poorer statistics, of the neon emission lines and molecular hydrogen lines, are found to be tightly correlated to the total IR luminosity, making individual MIR components good gauges of the total dust emission in SF galaxies. Like the total IR luminosity, these individual components can be used to estimate dust attenuation in the UV and in Halpha lines based on energy balance arguments. We also propose average scaling relations between these components and dust corrected, Halpha derived star-formation rates.
  • We have conducted a high-resolution spectroscopic study using Spitzer of 18 bulgeless (Sd/Sdm) galaxies that show no definitive signatures of nuclear activity in their optical spectra. This is the first systematic mid-IR search for weak or hidden AGNs in a statistically significant sample of bulgeless disk galaxies. Based on the detection of the high-ionization [NeV] line, we report the discovery of an AGN in one out of the 18 galaxies in the sample. This galaxy, NGC 4178, is a nearby edge-on Sd galaxy, which likely hosts a prominent nuclear star cluster (NSC). The bolometric luminosity of the AGN inferred from the [NeV] luminosity is ~ 8e41 ergs/s. This is almost two orders of magnitude greater than the luminosity of the AGN in NGC 4395, the best studied AGN in a bulgeless disk galaxy. Assuming that the AGN in NGC 4178 is radiating below the Eddington limit, the lower mass limit for the black hole is ~ 6e3M_sun. The fact that none of the other galaxies in the sample shows any evidence for an AGN demonstrates that while the AGN detection rate based on mid-IR diagnostics is high (30-40%) in optically quiescent galaxies with pseudobulges, it drops drastically in Sd/Sdm galaxies. Our observations therefore confirm that AGNs in completely bulgeless disk galaxies are not hidden in the optical but truly are rare. Of the three Sd galaxies with AGNs known so far, all have prominent NSCs, suggesting that in the absence of a well-defined bulge, the galaxy must possess a NSC in order to host an AGN. While the presence of a NSC appears to be a requirement for hosting an AGN in bulgeless galaxies, neither the properties of the NSC nor those of the host galaxy appear exceptional in late-type AGN hosts. The recipe for forming and growing a central black hole in a bulgeless galaxy therefore remains unknown.
  • We have studied a sample of 415 associated (z_ab z_em; relative velocity with respect to QSO <3000km/s) Mg II absorption systems with 1.0<=z_ab<=1.86, in the spectra of SDSS DR3 QSOs, to determine the dust content and ionization state in the absorbers. We studied the dependence of these properties on the properties of the QSOs and also, compared the properties with those of a similarly selected sample of 809 intervening systems (apparent relative velocity with respect to the QSO of >3000km/s), so as to understand their origin. From the analysis of the composite spectra, as well as from the comparison of measured equivalent widths in individual spectra, we conclude that the associated Mg II absorbers have higher apparent ionization, measured by the strength of the C IV absorption lines compared to the Mg II absorption lines, than the intervening absorbers. The ionization so measured appears to be related to apparent ejection velocity, being lower as the apparent ejection velocity is more and more positive. There is clear evidence, from the composite spectra, for SMC like dust attenuation in these systems; the 2175AA absorption feature is not present. The extinction is almost twice that observed in the similarly selected sample of intervening systems. We reconfirm that QSOs with non-zero FIRST radio flux are intrinsically redder than the QSOs with no detection in the FIRST survey. The incidence of associated Mg II systems in QSOs with non-zero FIRST radio flux is 1.7 times that in the QSOs with no detection in the FIRST survey. The associated absorbers in radio-detected QSOs which comprise about 12% of our sample, cause 3 times more reddening than the associated absorbers in radio-undetected QSOs. This excess reddening possibly suggests an intrinsic nature for the associated absorbers in radio-detected QSOs.
  • We report the discovery using Spitzers high resolution spectrograph of 7 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in a sample of 32 late-type galaxies that show no definitive signatures of AGN in their optical spectra. Our observations suggest that the AGN detection rate in late-type galaxies is possibly 4 times larger than what optical spectroscopic observations alone suggest. We demonstrate using photoionization models with an input AGN and an extreme EUV-bright starburst ionizing radiation field that the observed mid-infrared line ratios cannot be replicated unless an AGN contribution, in some cases as little as 10% of the total galaxy luminosity, is included. These models show that when the fraction of the total luminosity due to the AGN is low, optical diagnostics are insensitive to the presence of the AGN. In this regime of parameter space, the mid-infrared diagnostics offer a powerful tool for uncovering AGN missed by optical spectroscopy. The AGN bolometric luminosities in our sample range from ~3 X 10^41 - ~2 X 10^43 ergs s^-1, which, based on the Eddington limit, corresponds to a lower mass limit for the black hole that ranges from ~3 X 10^3Mdot to as high as ~1.5 X 10^5Mdot. These lower mass limits however do not put a strain on the well-known relationship between the black hole mass and the host galaxy's stellar velocity dispersion established in predominantly early-type galaxies. Our findings add to the growing evidence that black holes do form and grow in low-bulge environments and that they are significantly more common than optical studies indicate.
  • We have studied ~2100 early-type galaxies in the SDSS DR3 which have been detected by the GALEX Medium Imaging Survey (MIS), in the redshift range 0 < z < 0.11. Combining GALEX UV photometry with corollary optical data from the SDSS, we find that, at a 95 percent confidence level, at least ~30 percent of galaxies in this sample have UV to optical colours consistent with some recent star formation within the last Gyr. In particular, galaxies with a NUV - r colour less than 5.5 are very likely to have experienced such recent star formation, taking into account the possibility of a contribution to NUV flux from the UV upturn phenomenon. We find quantitative agreement between the observations and the predictions of a semi-analytical LCDM hierarchical merger model and deduce that early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0 < z < 0.11 have ~1 to 3 percent of their stellar mass in stars less than 1 Gyr old. The average age of this recently formed population is ~300 to 500 Myrs. We also find that monolithically evolving galaxies, where recent star formation can be driven solely by recycled gas from stellar mass loss, cannot exhibit the blue colours (NUV - r < 5.5) seen in a significant fraction (~30 percent) of our observed sample.
  • We have re-analyzed FUSE data and obtained new Chandra observations of Haro 11, a local (D_L=88 Mpc) UV luminous galaxy. Haro 11 has a similar far-UV luminosity (10^10.3 L_\odot), UV surface brightness (10^9.4 L_\odot kpc^-2), SFR, and metallicity to that observed in Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs). We show that Haro 11 has extended, soft thermal (kT~0.68 keV) X-ray emission with a luminosity and size which scales with the physical properties (e.g. SFR, stellar mass) of the host galaxy. An enhanced alpha/Fe, ratio of ~4 relative to solar abundance suggests significant supernovae enrichment. These results are consistent with the X-ray emission being produced in a shock between a supernovae driven outflow and the ambient material. The FUV spectra show strong absorption lines similar to those observed in LBG spectra. A blueshifted absorption component is identified as a wind outflowing at ~200-280 km/s. OVI\lambda\lambda1032,1038 emission, the dominant cooling mechanism for coronal gas at T~10^5.5 K is also observed. If associated with the outflow, the luminosity of the OVI emission suggests that <20% of the total mechanical energy from the supernovae and solar winds is being radiated away. This implies that radiative cooling through OVI is not significantly inhibiting the growth of the outflowing gas. In contradiction to the findings of Bergvall et al 2006, we find no convincing evidence of Lyman continuum leakage in Haro 11. We conclude that the wind has not created a `tunnel' allowing the escape of a significant fraction of Lyman continuum photons and place a limit on the escape fraction of f_{esc}<2%. Overall, both Haro 11 and a previously observed LBG analogue VV 114, provide an invaluable insight into the X-ray and FUV properties of high redshift LBGs.
  • We report the discovery of an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) in the nearby SAd galaxy NGC 3621 using Spitzer high spectral resolution observations. These observations reveal the presence of [NeV] 14 um and 24 um emission which is centrally concentrated and peaks at the position of the near-infrared nucleus. Using the [NeV] line luminosity, we estimate that the nuclear bolometric luminosity of the AGN is ~ 5 X 10^41 ergs s^-1, which corresponds based on the Eddington limit to a lower mass limit of the black hole of ~ 4 X 10^3 Msun. Using an order of magnitude estimate for the bulge mass based on the Hubble type of the galaxy, we find that this lower mass limit does not put a strain on the well-known relationship between the black hole mass and the host galaxy's stellar velocity dispersion established in predominantly early-type galaxies. Mutli-wavelength follow-up observations of NGC 3621 are required to obtain more precise estimates of the bulge mass, black hole mass, accretion rate, and nuclear bolometric luminosity. The discovery reported here adds to the growing evidence that a black hole can form and grow in a galaxy with no or minimal bulge.
  • We present a systematic analysis of archival HST WFPC2 ``Association'' data sets that correlate with the Chandra positions of a set of 44 ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) of nearby galaxies. We have improved the Chandra-HST relative astrometry whenever possible. Disparate numbers of potential ULX counterparts are found, and in some cases none are found. The lack of or low number of counterparts in some cases may be due to insufficient depth in the WFPC2 images. Particularly in late-type galaxies, the HST image in the ULX region was often complex or crowded. We therefore address various scenarios for the nature of the ULX since it is not known which, if any, of the sources found are true counterparts. The optical luminosities of the sources are typically in the range 10^4-6 L_sun. In several cases color information is available, with the colors roughly tending to be more red in early-type galaxies. This suggests that, in general, the (potential) counterparts found in early-type galaxies are likely to be older stellar populations, and are probably globular clusters. Several early-type galaxy counterparts have blue colors, which may be due to younger stellar populations in the host galaxies, however these could also be background sources. In spiral galaxies the sources may also be due to localized structure in the disks rather than bound stellar systems. Alternatively some of the counterparts in late-type galaxies may be isolated supergiant stars. The observed X-ray/optical flux ratio is diluted by the optical emission of the cluster in cases where the system is an X-ray binary in a cluster, particularly in the case of a low-mass X-ray binaries in old cluster. (abridged)
  • We have analyzed FUSE, XMM, and Chandra observations of VV 114, a local galaxy merger with strong similarities to typical high-redshift Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs). Diffuse thermal X-ray emission encompassing VV114 has been observed by Chandra and XMM. This region of hot (kT~0.59 keV) gas has an enhanced alpha to iron element ratio relative to solar abundances and follows the same relation as typical starbursts between its properties (luminosity, size, and temperature) and those of the starburst galaxy (star formation rate, dust temperature, galaxy mass). These results are consistent with the X-ray gas having been produced by shocks driven by a galactic superwind. The FUSE observations of VV 114 show strong, broad interstellar absorption lines with a pronounced blueshifted component(similar to what is seen in LBGs). This implies an outflow of material moving at 300-400 km/s relative to VV 114. The properties of the strong OVI absorption line are consistent with radiative cooling at the interface between the hot outrushing gas seen in X-rays and the cooler material seen in the other outflowing ions in the FUSE data. We show that the wind in VV114 has not created a ``tunnel'' that enables more than a small fraction (< few percent) of the ionizing photons from VV114 to escape into the IGM. Taken together, these data provide a more complete physical basis for understanding the outflows that seem to be generic in LBGs. This will lead to improved insight into the role that such outflows play in the evolution of galaxies and the inter-galactic medium.
  • We use \textit{GALEX} (Galaxy Evolution Explorer) near-UV (NUV) photometry of a sample of early-type galaxies selected in \textit{SDSS} (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) to study the UV color-magnitude relation (CMR). $NUV-r$ color is an excellent tracer of even small amounts ($\sim 1$% mass fraction) of recent ($\la 1$ Gyr) star formation and so the $NUV-r$ CMR allows us to study the effect of environment on the recent star formation history. We analyze a volume-limited sample of 839 visually-inspected early-type galaxies in the redshift range $0.05 < z < 0.10$ brighter than $M_{r}$ of -21.5 with any possible emission-line or radio-selected AGN removed to avoid contamination. We find that contamination by AGN candidates and late-type interlopers highly bias any study of recent star formation in early-type galaxies and that, after removing those, our lower limit to the fraction of massive early-type galaxies showing signs of recent star formation is roughly $30 \pm 3%$ This suggests that residual star formation is common even amongst the present day early-type galaxy population. We find that the fraction of UV-bright early-type galaxies is 25% higher in low-density environments. However, the density effect is clear only in the lowest density bin. The blue galaxy fraction for the subsample of the brightest early-type galaxies however shows a very strong density dependence, in the sense that the blue galaxy fraction is lower in a higher density region.
  • We are carrying out sensitive X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM of type II quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey based on their optical emission line properties. We present observations of four objects at redshifts 0.4 < z < 0.8 and an analysis of the archival data for four additional objects in the same redshift range. Six of the eight were detected in X-rays; five of them have sufficient signal to derive spectral information. All of the detected sources have intrinsic luminosities L(2-10 keV) > 5 x 10^43 erg s^-1. The five with sufficient counts for spectral fitting show evidence for significant absorption (N_H >~ a few x 10^22 cm^-2). At least three of the objects likely have N_H > 10^23 cm^-2; some may be Compton-thick (N_H > 10^{24} cm^-2). In the five objects for which we could fit spectra, the slopes tend to be significantly flatter than is typically observed in AGN; it is possible that this is due either to reprocessing of the nuclear emission or to a line of sight that passes through patchy absorption.
  • We have analyzed observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory of the diffuse emission by hot gas in 7 dwarf starburst galaxies, 6 edge-on starburst galaxies, and 9 Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies. These systems cover ranges of \~ 10^4 in X-ray luminosity and several thousand in star formation rate and K-band luminosity (a proxy for stellar mass). Despite this range in fundamental parameters, we find that the properties of the diffuse X-ray emission are very similar in all three classes of starburst galaxies. The spectrum of the diffuse emission is well fit by thermal emission from gas with kT ~ 0.25 to 0.8 keV and with several-times-solar abundance ratios of alpha elements to Fe. The ratio of the thermal X-ray to far-infrared luminosity is roughly constant, as is the characteristic surface brightness of the diffuse X-ray emission. The size of the diffuse X-ray source increases systematically with both far-infrared and K-Band luminosity. All three classes show strong morphological relationships between the regions of hot gas probed by the diffuse X-ray emission and the warm gas probed by optical line emission. These findings suggest that the same physical mechanism is producing the diffuse X-ray emission in the three types of starbursts, and are consistent with that mechanism being shocks driven by a galactic "superwind'' powered by the kinetic energy collectively supplied by stellar winds and supernovae in the starburst.
  • We present measurements of the FUV (1530A) and NUV (2310A) galaxy luminosity functions (LF) at low redshift (z<0.2) from GALEX observations matched to the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey. We split our FUV and NUV samples into two UV-bj color bins and two redshift bins. As observed at optical wavelengths, the local LF of the bluest galaxies tend to have steeper faint end slopes and fainter characteristic magnitudes M* than the reddest subsamples. We find evidence for color dependent evolution at very low redshift in both bands, with bright blue galaxies becoming dominant in the highest redshift bin. The evolution of the total LF is consistent with an 0.3 magnitude brightening between z=0 and 0.13, in agreement with the first analysis of deeper GALEX fields probing adjacent and higher redshifts.
  • We present the results of narrow-band and broad-band imaging with the Very Large Telescope of the field surrounding the radio galaxy TN J0924-2201 at z = 5.2. Fourteen candidate Ly alpha emitters with a rest-frame equivalent width of > 20 A were detected. Spectroscopy of 8 of these objects showed that 6 have redshifts similar to that of the radio galaxy. The density of emitters at the redshift of the radio galaxy is estimated to be a factor 1.5-6.2 higher than in the field, and comparable to the density of Ly alpha emitters in radio galaxy protoclusters at z = 4.1, 3.1 and 2.2. The Ly alpha emitters near TN J0924-2201 could therefore be part of a structure that will evolve into a massive cluster. These observations confirm that substantial clustering of Ly alpha emitters occurs at z > 5 and support the idea that radio galaxies pinpoint high density regions in the early Universe.
  • (modified) We present a comprehensive study of the physical properties of \~10^5 galaxies with measurable star formation in the SDSS. By comparing physical information extracted from the emission lines with continuum properties, we build up a picture of the nature of star-forming galaxies at z<0.2. We take out essentially all aperture bias using resolved imaging, allowing an accurate estimate of the total SFRs in galaxies. We determine the SFR density to be 1.915^{+0.02}_{-0.01}(rand.)^{+0.14}_{-0.42} (sys.) h70 10^{-2} Msun/yr/Mpc^3 at z=0.1 (for a Kroupa IMF) and we study the distribution of star formation as a function of various physical parameters. The majority of the star formation in the low redshift universe takes place in moderately massive galaxies (10^10-10^11 Msun), typically in HSB disk galaxies. Roughly 15% of all star formation takes place in galaxies that show some sign of an active nucleus. About 20% occurs in starburst galaxies. We show that the present to past-average star formation rate, the Scalo b-parameter; is almost constant over almost three orders of magnitude in mass, declining only at M*>10^10 Msun. The volume averaged b parameter is 0.408^{+0.005}_{-0.002} (rand).^{+0.029}_{-0.090} (sys.) h70^{-1}. We use this value constrain the star formation history of the universe. In agreement with other work we find a correlation between $b$ and morphological type, as well as a tight correlation between the 4000AA break (D4000) and b. We discuss how D4000 can be used to estimate b parameters for high redshift galaxies.
  • We study the variation of the stellar population properties as a function of distance from the nucleus for a sample of 35 Seyfert 2 galaxies using the technique of stellar population synthesis. We sample regions at the galaxies with dimensions in the range 200 x 200 to 400 x 400 pc and compare the synthesis results with those of a control sample of non-Seyfert galaxies. We find that both at the nucleus and up to 3 kpc from it the oldest age component (10 Gyr) presents a smaller contribution to the total flux in the Seyfert than in the non-Seyfert galaxies of the same Hubble type, while the components younger than 100 Myr present a larger contribution in the Seyfert's than in non-Seyferts. In addition, while for the non-Seyferts clear gradients are present, in which the contribution of the oldest components decrease with distance from the nucleus and the contribution of the 1 Gyr component increases -- we do not find such gradients in most Seyferts. These results suggest that the AGN-starburst connection is a large scale phenomenon affecting not only the inner few hundred parsecs, but the inner kiloparsecs.