• We present a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) survey of extended [O III] {\lambda}5007 emission for a sample of 12 nearby (z < 0.12), luminous Type 2 quasars (QSO2s), which we use to measure the extent and kinematics of their AGN-ionized gas. We find the size of the observed [O III] regions scale with luminosity in comparison to nearby, less luminous Seyfert galaxies and radially outflowing kinematics to exist in all targets. We report an average maximum outflow radius of $\sim$600 pc, with gas continuing to be kinematically influenced by the central AGN out to an average radius of $\sim$1130 pc. These findings question the effectiveness of AGN being capable of clearing material from their host bulge in the nearby universe and suggest that disruption of gas by AGN activity may prevent star formation without requiring evacuation. Additionally, we find a dichotomy in our targets when comparing [O III] radial extent and nuclear FWHM, where QSO2s with compact [O III] morphologies typically possess broader nuclear emission-lines.
  • We present an analysis of a $190$\,ks (net exposure) \textit{Suzaku} observation, carried out in 2007, of the nearby ($z=0.184$) luminous (L$_{\rm bol}\sim10^{47}$\,erg\,s$^{-1}$) quasar PDS\,456. In this observation, the intrinsically steep bare continuum is revealed compared to subsequent observations, carried out in 2011 and 2013, where the source is fainter, harder and more absorbed. We detected two pairs of prominent hard and soft flares, restricted to the first and second half of the observation respectively. The flares occur on timescales of the order of $\sim50$\,ks, which is equivalent to a light-crossing distance of $\sim10\,R_{\rm g}$ in PDS\,456. From the spectral variability observed during the flares, we find that the continuum changes appear to be dominated by two components: (i) a variable soft component ($<2$\,keV), which may be related to the Comptonized tail of the disc emission, and (ii) a variable hard power-law component ($>2$\,keV). The photon index of the latter power-law component appears to respond to changes in the soft band flux, increasing during the soft X-ray flares. Here the softening of the spectra, observed during the flares, may be due to Compton cooling of the disc corona induced by the increased soft X-ray photon seed flux. In contrast, we rule out partial covering absorption as the physical mechanism behind the observed short timescale spectral variability, as the timescales are likely too short to be accounted for by absorption variability.
  • We investigate the relationship between the long term X-ray spectral variability in the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151 and its intrinsic absorption, by comparing the 2014 simultaneous ultraviolet/X-Ray observations taken with Hubble STIS Echelle and Chandra HETGS with archival observations from Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku. The observations are divided into "high" and "low" states, with the low states showing strong and unabsorbed extended emission at energies below 2 keV. Our X-ray model consists of a broken powerlaw, neutral reflection and the two dominant absorption components identified by Kraemer et al. (2005), hereafter KRA2005, X-High and D+Ea, which are present in all epochs. The model fittings suggest that the absorbers are very stable, with the principal changes in the intrinsic absorption resulting from variations in the ionization state of the gas as the ionizing continuum varies. However, the low states show evidence of larger column densities in one or both of the absorbers. Among plausible explanations for the column increase, we discuss the possibility of an expanding/contracting X-ray corona. As suggested by KRA2005, there seem to be contributions from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) winds to the mass outflow. Along with the ultra fast outflow absorber identified by Tombesi et al. (2010), X-High is consistent with being magnetically driven. On the other hand, it is unlikely that D+Ea is part of the MHD flow, and it is possible that it is radiatively accelerated. These results suggest that at a sufficiently large radial distance there is a break point between MHD-dominated and radiatively driven outflows.
  • Mkn 3 is a Seyfert 2 galaxy that is widely regarded as an exemplary Compton-thick AGN. We study the Suzaku X-ray spectrum using models of the X-ray reprocessor that self-consistently account for the Fe K$\alpha$ fluorescent emission line and the associated Compton-scattered, or reflection, continuum. We find a solution in which the average global column density, $0.234^{+0.012}_{-0.010} \times 10^{24} \ \rm cm^{-2}$, is very different to the line-of-sight column density, $0.902^{+0.012}_{-0.013} \times 10^{24} \ \rm cm^{-2}$. The global column density is $\sim 5$ times smaller than that required for the matter distribution to be Compton-thick. Our model accounts for the profiles of the Fe K$\alpha$ and Fe K$\beta$ lines, and the Fe K edge remarkably well, with a solar abundance of Fe. The matter distribution could consist of a clumpy medium with a line-of-sight column density higher than the global average. A uniform, spherically-symmetric distribution alone cannot simultaneously produce the correct fluorescent line spectrum and reflection continuum. Previous works on Mkn 3, and other AGN, that assumed a reflection continuum from matter with an infinite column density could therefore lead to erroneous or "puzzling" conclusions if the matter out of the line-of-sight is really Compton-thin. Whereas studies of samples of AGN have generally only probed the line-of-sight column density, with simplistic, one-dimensional models, it is important now to establish the global column densities in AGN. It is the global properties that affect the energy budget in terms of reprocessing of X-rays into infrared emission, and that constrain population synthesis models of the cosmic X-ray background.
  • Ongoing studies with XMM-Newton have shown that powerful accretion disc winds, as revealed through highly-ionised Fe\,K-shell absorption at E>=6.7 keV, are present in a significant fraction of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the local Universe (Tombesi et al. 2010). In Gofford et al. (2013) we analysed a sample of 51 Suzaku-observed AGN and independently detected Fe K absorption in ~40% of the sample, and we measured the properties of the absorbing gas. In this work we build upon these results to consider the properties of the associated wind. On average, the fast winds (v_out>0.01c) are located <r>~10^{15-18} cm (typically ~10^{2-4} r_s) from their black hole, their mass outflow rates are of the order <M_out>~0.01-1 Msun/yr or ~(0.01-1) M_edd and kinetic power is constrained to <L_k> ~10^{43-45} erg/s, equivalent to ~(0.1-10%) L_edd. We find a fundamental correlation between the source bolometric luminosity and the wind velocity, with v_out \propto L_bol^{\alpha} and \alpha=0.4^{+0.3}_{-0.2}$ (90% confidence), which indicates that more luminous AGN tend to harbour faster Fe K winds. The mass outflow rate M_out, kinetic power L_k and momentum flux P_out of the winds are also consequently correlated with L_bol, such that more massive and more energetic winds are present in more luminous AGN. We investigate these properties in the framework of a continuum-driven wind, showing that the observed relationships are broadly consistent with a wind being accelerated by continuum-scattering. We find that, globally, a significant fraction (~85%) of the sample can plausibly exceed the L_k/L_bol~0.5% threshold thought necessary for feedback, while 45% may also exceed the less conservative ~5% of L_bol threshold as well. This suggests that the winds may be energetically significant for AGN--host-galaxy feedback processes.
  • The evolution of galaxies is connected to the growth of supermassive black holes in their centers. During the quasar phase, a huge luminosity is released as matter falls onto the black hole, and radiation-driven winds can transfer most of this energy back to the host galaxy. Over five different epochs, we detected the signatures of a nearly spherical stream of highly ionized gas in the broadband X-ray spectra of the luminous quasar PDS 456. This persistent wind is expelled at relativistic speeds from the inner accretion disk, and its wide aperture suggests an effective coupling with the ambient gas. The outflow's kinetic power larger than 10^46 ergs per second is enough to provide the feedback required by models of black hole and host galaxy co-evolution.
  • Ark 564 (z=0.0247) is an X-ray-bright NLS1. By using advanced X-ray timing techniques, an excess of "delayed" emission in the hard X-ray band (4-7.5 keV) following about 1000 seconds after "flaring" light in the soft X-ray band (0.4-1 keV) was recently detected. We report on the X-ray spectral analysis of eight XMM-Newton and one Suzaku observation of Ark 564. High-resolution spectroscopy was performed with the RGS in the soft X-ray band, while broad-band spectroscopy was performed with the EPIC-pn and XIS/PIN instruments. We analysed time-averaged, flux-selected, and time-resolved spectra. Despite the strong variability in flux during our observational campaign, the broad-band spectral shape of Ark 564 does not vary dramatically and can be reproduced either by a superposition of a power law and a blackbody emission or by a Comptonized power-law emission model. High-resolution spectroscopy revealed ionised gas along the line of sight at the systemic redshift of the source, with a low column density and a range of ionisation states. Broad-band spectroscopy revealed a very steep intrinsic continuum and a rather weak emission feature in the iron K band; modelling this feature with a reflection component requires highly ionised gas. A reflection-dominated or an absorption-dominated model are similarly able to well reproduce the time-averaged data from a statistical point of view, in both cases requiring contrived geometries and/or unlikely physical parameters. Finally, through time-resolved analysis we spectroscopically identified the "delayed" emission as a spectral hardening above ~4 keV; the most likely interpretation for this component is a reprocessing of the "flaring" light by gas located at 10-100 r_g from the central supermassive black hole that is so hot that it can Compton-upscatter the flaring intrinsic continuum emission.
  • We present a detailed, photoionization modeling analysis of XMM-Newton/Reflection Grating Spectrometer observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. The spectrum, previously analyzed by Kinkhabwala et al. (2002), reveals a myriad of soft-Xray emission lines, including those from H- and He-like carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon, and M- and L-shell iron. As noted in the earlier analysis, based on the narrowness of the radiative recombination continua, the electron temperatures in the emission-line gas are consistent with photoionization, rather than collisional ionization. The strengths of the carbon and nitrogen emission lines, relative to those of oxygen, suggest unusual elemental abundances, which we attribute to star-formation history of the host galaxy. Overall, the emission-lines are blue-shifted with respect to systemic, with radial velocities ~ 160 km/s, similar to that of [O III] 5007, and thus consistent with the kinematics and orientation of the optical emission-line gas and, hence, likely part of an AGN-driven outflow. We were able to achieve an acceptable fit to most of the strong emission-lines with a two-component photoionization model, generated with Cloudy. The two components have ionization parameters and column densities of logU = -0.05 and 1.22, and logN(H) = 20.85 and 21.2, and covering factors of 0.35 and 0.84, respectively. The total mass of the X-ray gas is roughly of an order of magnitude greater than the mass of ionized gas determined from optical and near-IR spectroscopy, which indicates that it may be the dominant component of the narrow line region. Furthermore, we suggest that the medium which produces the scattered/polarized optical emission in NGC~1068 possesses similar physical characteristics to those of the more highly-ionized of the X-ray model components.
  • We present the results of recent Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer and Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph observations of the nearby Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3783 which shows a strong, non-varying X-ray warm absorber and physically related and kinematically varying UV absorption. We compare our new observations to high-resolution, high signal-to-noise archival data from 2001, allowing a unique investigation into the long-term variations of the absorption over a 12 yr period. We find no statistically significant changes in the physical properties of the X-ray absorber, but there is a significant drop of ~40% in the UV and X-ray flux, and a significant flattening of the underlying X-ray power-law slope. Large kinematic changes are seen in the UV absorbers, possibly due to radial deceleration of the material. Similar behavior is not observed in the X-ray data, likely due to its lower velocity resolution, which shows an outflow velocity of v ~ -655 km/s in both epochs. The narrow iron K-alpha emission line at 6.4 keV shows no variation between epochs, and its measured width places the material producing the line at a radial distance of ~0.03 pc from the central black hole.
  • We present a comparison of two Suzaku X-ray observations of the nearby (z=0.184), luminous ($L_{bol} \sim 10^{47}$ erg s$^{-1}$) type I quasar, PDS456. A new 125ks Suzaku observation in 2011 caught the quasar during a period of low X-ray flux and with a hard X-ray spectrum, in contrast to a previous 190ks Suzaku observation in 2007 when the quasar appeared brighter and had a steep ($\Gamma>2$) X-ray spectrum. The 2011 X-ray spectrum contains a pronounced trough near 9\,keV in the quasar rest frame, which can be modeled with blue-shifted iron K-shell absorption, most likely from the He and H-like transitions of iron. The absorption trough is observed at a similar rest-frame energy as in the earlier 2007 observation, which appears to confirm the existence of a persistent high velocity wind in PDS 456, at an outflow velocity of $0.25-0.30$c. The spectral variability between 2007 and 2011 can be accounted for by variations in a partial covering absorber, increasing in covering fraction from the brighter 2007 observation to the hard and faint 2011 observation. Overall the low flux 2011 observation can be explained if PDS 456 is observed at relatively low inclination angles through a Compton thick wind, originating from the accretion disk, which significantly attenuates the X-ray flux from the quasar.
  • Recent evidence for a strong 'hard excess' of flux at energies > 20 keV in some Suzaku observations of type 1 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) has motivated an exploratory study of the phenomenon in the local type 1 AGN population. We have selected all type 1 AGN in the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) 58-month catalog and cross-correlated them with the holdings of the Suzaku public archive. We find the hard excess phenomenon to be a ubiquitous property of type 1 AGN. Taken together, the spectral hardness and equivalent width of Fe K alpha emission are consistent with reprocessing by an ensemble of Compton-thick clouds that partially cover the continuum source. In the context of such a model, ~ 80 % of the sample has a hardness ratio consistent with > 50% covering of the continuum by low-ionization, Compton-thick gas. More detailed study of the three hardest X-ray spectra in our sample reveal a sharp Fe K absorption edge at ~ 7 keV in each of them, indicating that blurred reflection is not responsible for the very hard spectral forms. Simple considerations place the distribution of Compton-thick clouds at or within the optical broad line region.
  • We present the results of the Suzaku observation of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 4507. This source is one of the X-ray brightest Compton-thin Seyfert 2s and a candidate for a variable absorber. Suzaku caught NGC 4507 in a highly absorbed state characterised by a high column density (NH \sim8 x10^23 cm^-2), a strong reflected component (R\sim 1.9) and a high equivalent width Fe K alpha emission line (EW\sim 500 eV). The Fe K alpha emission line is unresolved at the resolution of the Suzaku CCDs (sigma < 30 eV or FWHM < 3000 km s^-1) and most likely originates in a distant absorber. The Fe K beta emission line is also clearly detected and its intensity is marginally higher than the theoretical value for low ionisation Fe. A comparison with previous observations performed with XMM-Newton and BeppoSAX reveals that the X-ray spectral curvature changes on a timescale of a few months. We analysed all these historical observations, with standard models as well as with a most recent model for a toroidal reprocessor and found that the main driver of the observed 2-10 keV spectral variability is a change of the line-of-sight obscuration, varying from \sim4x10^23 cm^-2 to \sim9 x 10^23 cm^-2. The primary continuum is also variable, although its photon index does not appear to vary, while the Fe K alpha line and reflection component are consistent with being constant across the observations. This suggests the presence of a rather constant reprocessor and that the observed line of sight NH variability is either due to a certain degree of clumpiness of the putative torus or due to the presence of a second clumpy absorber.
  • The origin of the observed time lags, in nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN), between hard and soft X-ray photons is investigated using new XMM-Newton data for the narrow-line Seyfert I galaxy Ark 564 and existing data for 1H0707-495 and NGC 4051. These AGN have highly variable X-ray light curves that contain frequent, high peaks of emission. The averaged light curve of the peaks is directly measured from the time series, and it is shown that (i) peaks occur at the same time, within the measurement uncertainties, at all X-ray energies, and (ii) there exists a substantial tail of excess emission at hard X-ray energies, which is delayed with respect to the time of the main peak, and is particularly prominent in Ark 564. Observation (i) rules out that the observed lags are caused by Comptonization time delays and disfavors a simple model of propagating fluctuations on the accretion disk. Observation (ii) is consistent with time lags caused by Compton-scattering reverberation from material a few thousand light-seconds from the primary X-ray source. The power spectral density and the frequency-dependent phase lags of the peak light curves are consistent with those of the full time series. There is evidence for non-stationarity in the Ark 564 time series in both the Fourier and peaks analyses. A sharp `negative' lag (variations at hard photon energies lead soft photon energies) observed in Ark 564 appears to be generated by the shape of the hard-band transfer function and does not arise from soft-band reflection of X-rays. These results reinforce the evidence for the existence of X-ray reverberation in type I AGN, which requires that these AGN are significantly affected by scattering from circumnuclear material a few tens or hundreds of gravitational radii in extent.
  • Ultraviolet and X-ray observations show evidence of outflowing gas around many active galactic nuclei. Some of these outflows may be driven off gas infalling towards the central black hole. We perform radiative transfer calculations to compute the gas ionization state and X-ray spectra for two- and three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical simulations of this outflow-from-inflow scenario. By comparison with observations, our results can be used to test the theoretical models and guide future numerical simulations. We predict both absorption and emission features, most of which are formed in a polar funnel of outflowing gas. This outflow causes strong absorption for observer orientation angles of < 35 degrees. Particularly in 3D, the strength of this absorption varies significantly for different lines-of-sight owing to the fragmentary structure of the gas flow. Although infalling material occupies a large fraction of the simulation volume, we do not find that it imprints strong absorption features since the ionization state is very high. Thus, an absence of observed inflow absorption features does not exclude the models. The main spectroscopic consequence of the infalling gas is a scattered continuum component that partially re-fills the absorption features caused by the outflowing polar funnel. Fluorescence and scattering in the outflow is predicted to give rise to several emission features for all observer orientations. For the hydrodynamical simulations considered we find both ionization states and column densities for the outflowing gas that are too high to be quantitatively consistent with well-observed X-ray absorption systems. Nevertheless, our results are qualitatively encouraging and further exploration of the model parameter space is warranted. (Abridged.)
  • We have modeled a small sample of Seyfert galaxies that were previously identified as having simple X-ray spectra with little intrinsic absorption. The sources in this sample all contain moderately broad components of Fe K-shell emission and are ideal candidates for testing the applicability of a Compton-thick accretion-disk wind model to AGN emission components. Viewing angles through the wind allow the observer to see the absorption signature of the gas, whereas face-on viewing angles allow the observer to see the scattered light from the wind. We find that the Fe K emission line profiles are well described with a model of a Compton-thick accretion-disk wind of solar abundances, arising tens to hundred of gravitational radii from the central black hole. Further, the fits require a neutral component of Fe K alpha emission that is too narrow to arise from the inner part of the wind, and likely comes from a more distant reprocessing region. Our study demonstrates that a Compton-thick wind can have a profound effect on the observed X-ray spectrum of an AGN, even when the system is not viewed through the flow.
  • We present the analysis of a new broad-band X-ray spectrum (0.6-180.0 keV) of the radio-quiet quasar MR 2251-178 which uses data obtained with both Suzaku and the Swift/BAT. In accordance with previous observations, we find that the general continuum can be well described by a power-law with {\Gamma}=1.6 and an apparent soft-excess below 1 keV. Warm absorption is clearly present and absorption lines due to the Fe UTA, Fe L (Fe XXIII-XXIV), S XV and S XVI are detected below 3 keV. At higher energies, Fe K absorption from Fe XXV-XXVI is detected and a relatively weak (EW=25[+12,-8] eV) narrow Fe K{\alpha} emission line is observed at E=6.44\pm0.04 keV. The Fe K{\alpha} emission is well modelled by the presence of a mildly ionised ({\xi}\leq30) reflection component with a low reflection fraction (R<0.2). At least 5 ionised absorption components with 10^{20} \leq N_H \leq 10^{23} cm^{-2} and 0 \leq log({\xi})/erg cm s^{-1} \leq 4 are required to achieve an adequate spectral fit. Alternatively, we show that the continuum can also be fit if a {\Gamma}~2.0 power-law is absorbed by a column of N_H~10^{23} cm^{-2} which covers ~30% of the source flux. Independent of which continuum model is adopted, the Fe L and Fe XXV He{\alpha} lines are described by a single absorber outflowing with v_out~0.14 c. Such an outflow/disk wind is likely to be substantially clumped (b~10^{-3}) in order to not vastly exceed the likely accretion rate of the source.
  • We present the results of a deep 300 ks Chandra HETG observation of the highly variable narrow-line Seyfert Type 1 galaxy NGC 4051. The HETG spectrum reveals 28 significant soft X-ray ionised lines in either emission or absorption; primarily originating from H-like and He-like K-shell transitions of O, Ne, Mg and Si (including higher order lines and strong forbidden emission lines from O VII and Ne IX) plus high ionisation L-shell transitions from Fe XVII to Fe XXII and lower ionisation inner-shell lines (e.g. O VI). Modelling the data with XSTAR requires four distinct ionisation zones for the gas, all outflowing with velocities < 1000 km/s. A selection of the strongest emission/absorption lines appear to be resolved with FWHM of ~600 km/s. We also present the results from a quasi-simultaneous 350 ks Suzaku observation of NGC 4051 where the XIS spectrum reveals strong evidence for blueshifted absorption lines at ~6.8 and ~7.1 keV, consistent with previous findings. Modelling with XSTAR suggests that this is the signature of a highly ionised, high velocity outflow (log \xi ~ 4.1; v ~ -0.02c) which potentially may have a significant effect on the host galaxy environment via feedback. Finally, we also simultaneously model the broad-band 2008 XIS+HXD Suzaku data with archival Suzaku data from 2005 when the source was observed to have entered an extended period of low flux in an attempt to analyse the cause of the long-term spectral variability. We find that we can account for this by allowing for large variations in the normalisation of the intrinsic power-law component which may be interpreted as being due to significant changes in the covering fraction of a Compton-thick partial-coverer obscuring the central continuum emission.
  • We focus on determining the underlying physical cause of a Seyfert galaxy's appearance as type a 1.8 or 1.9. Are these "intermediate" Seyfert types typical Seyfert 1 nuclei with reddened broad-line regions? Or are they objects with intrinsically weak continua and broad emission lines? We compare measurements of the optical reddening of the narrow and broad-line regions with each other and with the X-ray column derived from XMM-Newton 0.5-10 keV spectra to determine the presence and location of dust in the line of sight. We also searched the literature to see if the objects showed evidence for broad-line variability, and determined if the changes were consistent with a change in reddening or a change in the intrinsic ionizing continuum flux. We find that 10 of 19 objects previously classified as Seyfert 1.8/1.9s received this designation due to their low continuum flux. In four objects the classification was due to BLR reddening, either by the torus or dust structures in the vicinity of the NLR; in the remaining five objects there is not sufficient evidence to favor one scenario over the other. These findings imply that, in general, samples of 1.8/1.9s are not suitable for use in studies of the gas and dust in the central torus.
  • We perform multi-dimensional radiative transfer simulations to compute spectra for a hydrodynamical simulation of a line-driven accretion disk wind from an active galactic nucleus. The synthetic spectra confirm expectations from parameterized models that a disk wind can imprint a wide variety of spectroscopic signatures including narrow absorption lines, broad emission lines and a Compton hump. The formation of these features is complex with contributions originating from many of the different structures present in the hydrodynamical simulation. In particular, spectral features are shaped both by gas in a successfully launched outflow and in complex flows where material is lifted out of the disk plane but ultimately falls back. We also confirm that the strong Fe Kalpha line can develop a weak, red-skewed line wing as a result of Compton scattering in the outflow. In addition, we demonstrate that X-ray radiation scattered and reprocessed in the flow has a pivotal part in both the spectrum formation and determining the ionization conditions in the wind. We find that scattered radiation is rather effective in ionizing gas which is shielded from direct irradiation from the central source. This effect likely makes the successful launching of a massive disk wind somewhat more challenging and should be considered in future wind simulations.
  • Highly-ionized fast accretion-disk winds have been suggested as an explanation for a variety of observed absorption and emission features in the X-ray spectra of Active Galactic Nuclei. Simple estimates have suggested that these flows may be massive enough to carry away a significant fraction of the accretion energy and could be involved in creating the link between supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. However, testing these hypotheses, and quantifying the outflow signatures, requires high-quality theoretical spectra for comparison with observations. Here we describe extensions of our Monte Carlo radiative transfer code that allow us to generate realistic theoretical spectra for a much wider variety of disk wind models than possible in our previous work. In particular, we have expanded the range of atomic physics simulated by the code so that L- and M-shell ions can now be included. We have also substantially improved our treatment of both ionization and radiative heating such that we are now able to compute spectra for outflows containing far more diverse plasma conditions. We present example calculations that illustrate the variety of spectral features predicted by parametrized outflow models and demonstrate their applicability to the interpretation of data by comparison with observations of the bright quasar PG1211+143. We find that the major features in the observed 2 - 10 keV spectrum of this object can be well-reproduced by our spectra, confirming that it likely hosts a massive outflow.
  • X-ray spectra of AGN often contain signatures indicative of absorption in multiple layers of gas whose ionization-state and covering fraction may vary with time. It has been unclear to date how much of the observed X-ray spectral and timing behavior in AGN can be attributed to variations in absorption, versus variations in the strengths of emission or reflection components. Diagnostics of the inner regions of AGN cannot be reliably performed until the origin of observed effects is understood. We investigate the role of the X-ray absorbers in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516. Time-averaged and flux-selected spectroscopy is used to examine the behavior of NGC 3516 observed in Chandra HETG and XMM data from Oct 2006. New H-like and He-like emission and absorption features discovered in the Fe K regime reveal a previously unknown zone of circumnuclear gas in NGC 3516 with log xi ~ 4.3 and column density 1E23 cm^-2. A lower-ionization layer with log xi ~2 and of similar column density is confirmed from previous observations, this layer has a covering fraction around 50%, and changes in covering provide a simple explanation of a deep dip in the light curve that we interpret as an eclipse of the continuum due to passage of a cloud across the sight line within half a day. These inner zones of absorbing gas are detected to have outflow velocities in the range 1000-2000 km/s, this, and constraints on radial location are consistent with an origin as part of a disk wind in NGC 3516.
  • We present Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared spectra of 12 Seyfert 1.8 and 1.9 galaxies over the 5-38 um region. We compare the spectral characteristics of this sample to those of 58 Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies from the Spitzer archives. An analysis of the spectral shapes, the silicate 10 um feature and the emission line fluxes have enabled us to characterize the mid-IR properties of Seyfert 1.8/1.9s. We find that the equivalent widths of the 10 um silicate feature are generally weak in all Seyfert galaxies, as previously reported by several studies. The few Seyfert galaxies in this sample that show deep 10 um silicate absorption features are highly inclined and/or merging galaxies. It is likely that these absorption features originate primarily in the dusty interstellar medium of the host galaxy rather than in a dusty torus on parsec scales close to the central engine. We find that the equivalent width of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) band at 6.2 um correlates strongly with the 20-30 um spectral index. Either of these quantities are good indicators of the amount of starburst contribution to the mid-IR spectra. The spectra of Seyfert 1.8 and 1.9s are dominated by these starburst features, similar to most Seyfert 2s. They show strong PAH bands and a strong red continuum toward 30 um. The strengths of the high-ionization forbidden narrow emission lines [O IV] 25.89 um, [Ne III] 15.56 um and [Ne V] 14.32 um relative to [Ne II] 12.81 um are weaker in Seyfert 1.8/1.9s and Seyfert 2s as compared to Seyfert 1s. The weakness of high-ionization lines in Seyfert 1.8-1.9s is suggestive of intrinsically weak active galactic nuclei (AGN) continua, and/or stronger star formation activity leading to enhanced [Ne II]. We discuss the implications of these observational results in the context of the Unified Model of AGN.
  • CONTEXT: The variable X-ray spectra of AGN systematically show steep power-law high states and hard-spectrum low states. The hard low state has previously been found to be a component with only weak variability. The origin of this component and the relative importance of effects such as absorption and relativistic blurring are currently not clear. AIMS: In a follow-up of previous principal components analysis, we aim to determine the relative importance of scattering and absorption effects on the time-varying X-ray spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk~766. METHODS: Time-resolved spectroscopy, slicing XMM and Suzaku data down to 25 ks elements, is used to investigate whether absorption or scattering components dominate the spectral variations in Mrk 766.Time-resolved spectroscopy confirms that spectral variability in Mrk 766 can be explained by either of two interpretations of principal components analysis. Detailed investigation confirm rapid changes in the relative strengths of scattered and direct emission or rapid changes in absorber covering fraction provide good explanations of most of the spectral variability. However, a strong correlation between the 6.97 keV absorption line and the primary continuum together with rapid opacity changes show that variations in a complex and multi-layered absorber, most likely a disk wind, are the dominant source of spectral variability in Mrk 766
  • We present the results from our 140 ks XMM-Newton and 500 ks Chandra observation of NGC 5548. The velocity structure of the X-ray absorber is consistent with the velocity structure measured in the simultaneous UV spectra. In the X-rays we can separate the highest outflow velocity component, -1040 km/s, from the other velocity components. This velocity component spans at least three orders of magnitude in ionization parameter, producing both highly ionized X-ray absorption lines (Mg XII, Si XIV) and UV absorption lines. A similar conclusion is very probable for the other four velocity components. We show that the lower ionized absorbers are not in pressure equilibrium with the rest of the absorbers. Instead, a model with a continuous distribution of column density versus ionization parameter gives an excellent fit to our data.
  • Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy has been obtained for the narrow line Seyfert galaxy Mrk766 from XMM-Newton observations. We present analysis in the energy-time plane of EPIC pn data in the 4-8 keV band with energy resolution R~50. A component of Fe Ka emission detected in the maps shows a variation of photon energy with time that appears both to be statistically significant and to be consistent with sinusoidal variation. We investigate the interpretation that there exists a component of line emission from matter in a Keplerian orbit around a supermassive black hole. The orbit has a period ~165 ks and a line-of-sight velocity ~13,500 km/s. This yields a lower limit for the central mass of M > 4.9x10^5 solar masses within a radius of 3.6 x 10^13 cm (2.4 A.U.). The orbit parameters are consistent with higher black hole masses, but the lack of any substantial gravitational redshift of the orbit implies an upper limit to the black hole mass of 4.5x10^7 solar masses.