• AKARI, the first Japanese satellite dedicated to infrared astronomy, was launched on 2006 February 21, and started observations in May of the same year. AKARI has a 68.5 cm cooled telescope, together with two focal-plane instruments, which survey the sky in six wavelength bands from the mid- to far-infrared. The instruments also have the capability for imaging and spectroscopy in the wavelength range 2 - 180 micron in the pointed observation mode, occasionally inserted into the continuous survey operation. The in-orbit cryogen lifetime is expected to be one and a half years. The All-Sky Survey will cover more than 90 percent of the whole sky with higher spatial resolution and wider wavelength coverage than that of the previous IRAS all-sky survey. Point source catalogues of the All-Sky Survey will be released to the astronomical community. The pointed observations will be used for deep surveys of selected sky areas and systematic observations of important astronomical targets. These will become an additional future heritage of this mission.
  • Discrete gamma-rays from the neutron capture state of 13C to its low-lying bound states have been measured using pulsed neutrons at En = 550 keV. The partial capture cross sections have been determined to be 1.7+/-0.5, 24.2+/-1.0, 2.0+/-0.4 and 1.0+/-0.4 microb for the ground (1/2-), first (1/2+), second (3/2-) and third (5/2+) excited states, respectively. From a comparison with theoretical predictions based on the non-resonant direct radiative capture mechanism, we could determine the spectroscopic factor for the 1/2+ state to be 0.80 +/- 0.04, free from neutron-nucleus interaction ambiguities in the continuum. In addition we have detected the contribution of the non-resonant d-wave capture component in the partial cross sections for transitions leading to the 1/2- and 3/2- states. While the s-wave capture dominates at En < 100 keV, the d-wave component turns out to be very important at higher energies. From the present investigation the 12C(n,gamma)13C reaction rate is obtained for temperatures in the range 10E+7 - 10E+10 K.
  • In May 1994 the BL Lac object PKS 2155-304 was observed continuously for ~10 d with IUE and EUVE and for 2 d with ASCA, as well as with ROSAT and with ground- based radio, IR, and optical telescopes. The light curves show a well-defined X-ray flare (x2 increase in 1/2 d, with similar decay) followed by a broader, lower amplitude EUV flare ~1 day later, and a broad, low-amplitude UV flare ~2 d later (amplitude ~35%, duration >2 d). In the preceding week there was at least one X-ray flare of comparable amplitude or perhaps ongoing stochastic X-ray variations. An extremely rapid change in UV flux was seen at the beginning of the IUE observation. Assuming the central X-ray, EUV, and UV events are associated, the lags, the decrease of amplitude with wavelength, and the broadening of the temporal profile with wavelength are all qualitatively as expected for synchrotron emission from an inhomogeneous relativistic jet. We can rule out a Fermi-type shock acceleration event or a pair cascade in a homogeneous synchrotron-emitting region. A homogeneous region is still possible if there was an instantaneous (t<<hours) injection of high energy electrons that emit first at X-ray energies. Alternatively, the data are consistent with a compression wave or other disturbance crossing a region with stratified particle energy distributions (e.g., behind a shock front and/or in an inhomogeneous jet). The present light curves are in sharp contrast to November 1991, when the amplitude was wavelength independent and the UV lagged the X-rays by less than ~3 hours. This means that the origin of rapid multiwavelength variability in this blazar is complex, involving at least two different modes. (abbreviated abstract)
  • We report the results from an ASCA X-ray observation of the powerful Broad Line Radio Galaxy, 3C109. The ASCA spectra confirm our earlier ROSAT detection of intrinsic X-ray absorption associated with the source. The absorbing material obscures a central engine of quasar-like luminosity. The luminosity is variable, having dropped by a factor of two since the ROSAT observations 4 years before. The ASCA data also provide evidence for a broad iron emission line from the source, with an intrinsic FWHM of ~ 120,000 km/s. Interpreting the line as fluorescent emission from the inner parts of an accretion disk, we can constrain the inclination of the disk to be $> 35$ degree, and the inner radius of the disk to be $< 70$ Schwarzschild radii. Our results support unified schemes for active galaxies, and demonstrate a remarkable similarity between the X-ray properties of this powerful radio source, and those of lower luminosity, Seyfert 1 galaxies.
  • We present the results of a 4 day ASCA observation of the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15, focussing on the nature of the X-ray absorption by the warm absorber, characterizd by the K-edges of the intermediately ionized oxygen, OVII and OVIII. We confirm that the column density of OVIII changes on a timescale of $\sim 10^4$~s when the X-ray continuum flux decreases. The significant anti-correlation of column density with continuum flux gives direct evidence that the warm absorber is photoionized by the X-ray continuum. From the timescale of the variation of the OVIII column density, we estimate that it originates from gas within a radius of about $10^{17}\cm$ of the central engine. In contrast, the depth of the OVII edge shows no response to the continuum flux, which indicates that it originates in gas at larger radii. Our results strongly suggest that there are two warm absorbing regions; one located near or within the Broad Line Region, the other associated with the outer molecular torus, scattering medium or Narrow Line Region.