• We predict the resonance enhanced magnetic field dependence of atom-dimer relaxation and three-body recombination rates in a $^{87}$Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) close to 1007 G. Our exact treatments of three-particle scattering explicitly include the dependence of the interactions on the atomic Zeeman levels. The Feshbach resonance distorts the entire diatomic energy spectrum causing interferences in both loss phenomena. Our two independent experiments confirm the predicted recombination loss over a range of rate constants that spans four orders of magnitude.
  • Pairs of trapped atoms can be associated to make a diatomic molecule using a time dependent magnetic field to ramp the energy of a scattering resonance state from above to below the scattering threshold. A relatively simple model, parameterized in terms of the background scattering length and resonance width and magnetic moment, can be used to predict conversion probabilities from atoms to molecules. The model and its Landau-Zener interpretation are described and illustrated by specific calculations for $^{23}$Na, $^{87}$Rb, and $^{133}$Cs resonances. The model can be readily adapted to Bose-Einstein condensates. Comparison with full many-body calculations for the condensate case show that the model is very useful for making simple estimates of molecule conversion efficiencies.
  • We present a new sample of 415 bright QSOs and Seyfert~1 nuclei drawn from the Hamburg/ESO survey (HES). The sample is spectroscopically 99 % complete and well-defined in terms of flux and redshift limits. Optical magnitudes are in the interval 13 < B_J < 17.5, redshifts range within 0< z < 3.2. More than 50 % of the objects in the sample are new discoveries. We describe the selection techniques and discuss sample completeness and potential selection effects. There is no evidence for redshift-dependent variations of completeness; in particular, low-redshift QSOs - notoriously missed by other optical surveys - are abundant in this sample, since no discrimination against extended sources is imposed. For the same reason, the HES is not biased against multiply imaged QSOs due to gravitational lensing. The sample forms the largest homogeneous set of bright QSOs currently in existence, useful for a variety of statistical studies. We have redetermined the bright part of the optical quasar number-magnitude relation. We confirm that the Palomar-Green survey is significantly incomplete, but that its degree of incompleteness has recently been overestimated.
  • Molecular beams of rare gas atoms and D_2 have been diffracted from 100 nm period SiN_x transmission gratings. The relative intensities of the diffraction peaks out to the 8th order depend on the diffracting particle and are interpreted in terms of effective slit widths. These differences have been analyzed by a new theory which accounts for the long-range van der Waals -C_3/l^3 interaction of the particles with the walls of the grating bars. The values of the C_3 constant for two different gratings are in good agreement and the results exhibit the expected linear dependence on the dipole polarizability.
  • We present the analysis of a new flux-limited sample of bright quasars and Seyfert 1 galaxies in an effective area of 611 square deg, drawn from the Hamburg/ESO survey. We confirm recent claims that bright quasars have a higher surface density than previously thought. Special care was taken to avoid morphological and photometric biases against low-redshift quasars, and about 50 % of the sample objects are at z < 0.3, spanning a range of three decades in luminosity. While our derived space densities for low-luminosity Seyfert 1 nuclei are consistent with those found in the literature, we find that luminous QSOs, M_B < -24, are much more numerous in the local universe than previous surveys indicated. The optical luminosity functions of Seyfert 1 nuclei and QSOs join smoothly, and if the host galaxy contributions are taken into account, a single power-law of slope alpha = -2.2 describes the combined local luminosity function adequately, over the full range in absolute magnitude. Comparing our data with published results at higher redshifts, we can rule out pure luminosity evolution as an acceptable parametrisation; the luminosity function of quasars changes shape and slope with z, in the sense that the most luminous quasars show the weakest evolution.