• We present observations of transverse oscillations in slender Ca II H fibrils (SCFs) in the lower solar chromosphere. We use a 1 hr long time series of high- (spatial and temporal-) resolution seeing-free observations in a 0.11 nm wide passband covering the line core of Ca II H 396.9 nm from the second flight of the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. The entire field of view, spanning the polarity inversion line of an active region close to the solar disk center, is covered with bright, thin, and very dynamic fine structures. Our analysis reveals the prevalence of transverse waves in SCFs with median amplitudes and periods on the order of 2.4+-0.8 km/s and 83+-29 s, respectively (with standard deviations given as uncertainties). We find that the transverse waves often propagate along (parts of) the SCFs with median phase speeds of 9+-14 km/s. While the propagation is only in one direction along the axis in some of the SCFs, propagating waves in both directions, as well as standing waves are also observed. The transverse oscillations are likely Alfvenic and are thought to be representative of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves. The wave propagation suggests that the rapid high-frequency transverse waves, often produced in the lower photosphere, can penetrate into the chromosphere with an estimated energy flux of ~ 15 kW/m^2. Characteristics of these waves differ from those reported for other fibrillar structures, which, however, were observed mainly in the upper solar chromosphere.
  • Convective flows are known as the prime means of transporting magnetic fields on the solar surface. Thus, small magnetic structures are good tracers of the turbulent flows. We study the migration and dispersal of magnetic bright features (MBFs) in intergranular areas observed at high spatial resolution with Sunrise/IMaX. We describe the flux dispersal of individual MBFs as a diffusion process whose parameters are computed for various areas in the quiet Sun and the vicinity of active regions from seeing-free data. We find that magnetic concentrations are best described as random walkers close to network areas (diffusion index, gamma=1.0), travelers with constant speeds over a supergranule (gamma=1.9-2.0), and decelerating movers in the vicinity of flux emergence and/or within active regions (gamma=1.4-1.5). The three types of regions host MBFs with mean diffusion coefficients of 130 km^2/s, 80-90 km^2/s, and 25-70 km^2/s, respectively. The MBFs in these three types of regions are found to display a distinct kinematic behavior at a confidence level in excess of 95%.
  • How and where are coronal loops rooted in the solar lower atmosphere? The details of the magnetic environment and its evolution at the footpoints of coronal loops are crucial to understanding the processes of mass and energy supply to the solar corona. To address the above question, we use high-resolution line-of-sight magnetic field data from the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment instrument on the SUNRISE balloon-borne observatory and coronal observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory of an emerging active region. We find that the coronal loops are often rooted at the locations with minor small-scale but persistent opposite-polarity magnetic elements very close to the larger dominant polarity. These opposite-polarity small-scale elements continually interact with the dominant polarity underlying the coronal loop through flux cancellation. At these locations we detect small inverse Y-shaped jets in chromospheric Ca II H images obtained from the SUNRISE Filter Imager during the flux cancellation. Our results indicate that magnetic flux cancellation and reconnection at the base of coronal loops due to mixed polarity fields might be a crucial feature for the supply of mass and energy into the corona.
  • Bright points (BPs) are manifestations of small magnetic elements in the solar photosphere. Their brightness contrast not only gives insight into the thermal state of the photosphere (and chromosphere) in magnetic elements, but also plays an important role in modulating the solar total and spectral irradiance. Here we report on simultaneous high-resolution imaging and spectropolarimetric observations of BPs using Sunrise balloon-borne observatory data of the quiet Sun at disk center. BP contrasts have been measured between 214 nm and 525 nm, including the first measurements at wavelengths below 388 nm. The histograms of the BP peak brightness show a clear trend toward broader contrast distributions and higher mean contrasts at shorter wavelengths. At 214 nm we observe a peak brightness of up to five times the mean quiet-Sun value, the highest BP contrast so far observed. All BPs are associated with a magnetic signal, although in a number of cases it is surprisingly weak. Most of the BPs show only weak downflows, the mean value being 240 m/s, but some display strong down- or upflows reaching a few km/s.
  • Until today, the small size of magnetic elements in quiet Sun areas has required the application of indirect methods, such as the line-ratio technique or multi-component inversions, to infer their physical properties. A consistent match to the observed Stokes profiles could only be obtained by introducing a magnetic filling factor that specifies the fraction of the observed pixel filled with magnetic field. Here, we investigate the properties of a small magnetic patch in the quiet Sun observed with the IMaX magnetograph on board the balloon-borne telescope Sunrise with unprecedented spatial resolution and low instrumental stray light. We apply an inversion technique based on the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation to retrieve the temperature stratification and the field strength in the magnetic patch. The observations can be well reproduced with a one-component, fully magnetized atmosphere with a field strength exceeding 1 kG and a significantly enhanced temperature in the mid- to upper photosphere with respect to its surroundings, consistent with semi-empirical flux tube models for plage regions. We therefore conclude that, within the framework of a simple atmospheric model, the IMaX measurements resolve the observed quiet-Sun flux tube.
  • The Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory consists of a 1m aperture Gregory telescope, a UV filter imager, an imaging vector polarimeter, an image stabilization system and further infrastructure. The first science flight of Sunrise yielded high-quality data that reveal the structure, dynamics and evolution of solar convection, oscillations and magnetic fields at a resolution of around 100 km in the quiet Sun. After a brief description of instruments and data, first qualitative results are presented. In contrast to earlier observations, we clearly see granulation at 214 nm. Images in Ca II H display narrow, short-lived dark intergranular lanes between the bright edges of granules. The very small-scale, mixed-polarity internetwork fields are found to be highly dynamic. A significant increase in detectable magnetic flux is found after phase-diversity-related reconstruction of polarization maps, indicating that the polarities are mixed right down to the spatial resolution limit, and probably beyond.
  • This is the final version of the author's diploma thesis written at the Humboldt University of Berlin in 1995. The topic is the flow of granular material in narrow vertical pipes, driven by the gravity, that is described by Langevin equations. Neglecting the interactions, we can solve the resulting Fokker-Planck equation for the homogeneous case. The consideration of inelastic collisions leads to a Boltzmann equation. Assuming local equilibrium, the hydrodynamic equations lead to the extension of the Langevin equation formalism for the inhomogeneous case. For certain parameter ranges, our formalism can also be used to describe traffic flows. We applied stability analyses to the hydrodynamic equations and found critical densities for the occurrence of particle clustering. We used numerical simulations of the Langevin equations to verify our homogeneous solution as well as the critical densities.
  • We present a 106-minute TiO (705.7nm) time series of high spatial and temporal resolution that contains thousands of umbral dots (UDs) in a mature sunspot in the active region NOAA 10667 at $\mu$=0.95. The data were acquired with the 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope on La Palma. With the help of a multilevel tracking (MLT) algorithm the sizes, brightnesses, and trajectories of 12836 umbral dots were found and analyzed. The MLT allows UDs with very low contrast to be reliably identified. Inside the umbra we determine a UD filling factor of 11%. The histogram of UD lifetimes is monotonic, i.e. a UD does not have a typical lifetime. Three quarters of the UDs lived for less than 150s and showed no or little motion. The histogram of the UD diameters exhibits a maximum at 225km, i.e. most of the UDs are spatially resolved. UDs display a typical horizontal velocity of 420m/s and a typical peak intensity of 51% of the mean intensity of the quiet photosphere, making them on average 20% brighter than the local umbral background. Almost all mobile UDs (large birth-death distance) were born close to the umbra-penumbra boundary, move towards the umbral center, and are brighter than average. Notably bright and mobile UDs were also observed along a prominent UD chain, both ends of which are located at the umbra-penumbra boundary. Their motion started primarily at either of the ends of the chain, continued along the chain, and ended near the chain's center. We observed the splitting and merging of UDs and the temporal succession of both. For the first time the evolution of brightness, size, and horizontal speed of a typical UD could be determined in a statistically significant way. Considerable differences between the evolution of central and peripheral UDs are found, which point to a difference in origin.
  • Granular flows through pipes show interesting phenomena, e.g. clogging and density waves, 1/f-noise. These things are fairly good studied by computer-experiments, but there is a lack in theoretical and analytical consideration. We introduce a simple "minimal" model describing such a flow of granular particles and examine the stability of an initially homogeneous system against perturbations. In order to define the collisions between the granular particles we use two different approaches. For both, the simple and the more advanced collision definition, the model shows the qualitative same behaviour.
  • This work aims to constrain the physical nature of umbral dots (UDs) using high-resolution spectropolarimetry. Full Stokes spectra recorded by the spectropolarimeter on Hinode of 51 UDs in a sunspot close to the disk center are analyzed. The height dependence of the temperature, magnetic field vector, and line-of-sight velocity across each UD is obtained from an inversion of the Stokes vectors of the two FeI lines at 630 nm. No difference is found at higher altitudes (-3 <= log(tau) <= -2) between the UDs and the diffuse umbral background. Below that level the difference rapidly increases, so that at the continuum formation level (log(tau) = 0) we find on average a temperature enhancement of 570 K, a magnetic field weakening of 510 G, and upflows of 800 m/s for peripheral UDs, whereas central UDs display an excess temperature of on average 550 K, a field weakening of 480 G, and no significant upflows. The results for, in particular, the peripheral UDs, including cuts of magnetic vector and velocity through them, look remarkably similar to the output of recent radiation MHD simulations. They strongly suggest that UDs are produced by convective upwellings.
  • aims: We study the recently discovered twisting motion of bright penumbral filaments with the aim of constraining their geometry and the associated magnetic field. methods: A large sunspot located $40\degr$ from disk center was observed at high resolution with the 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope. Inversions of multi-wavelength polarimetric data and speckle reconstructed time series of continuum images were used to determine proper motions, as well as the velocity and magnetic structure in penumbral filaments. results: The continuum movie reveals apparent lateral motions of bright and dark structures inside bright filaments oriented parallel to the limb, confirming recent Hinode results. In these filaments we measure upflows of $\approx 1.1 \mathrm{km/s}$ on their limbward side and weak downflows on their centerward side. The magnetic field in them is significantly weaker and more horizontal than in the adjacent dark filaments. conclusions: The data indicate the presence of vigorous convective rolls in filaments with a nearly horizontal magnetic field. These are separated by filaments harbouring stronger, more vertical fields. Because of reduced gas pressure, we see deeper into the latter. When observed near the limb, the disk-centerward side of the horizontal-field filaments appear bright due to the \textit{hot wall} effect known from faculae. We estimate that the convective rolls transport most of the energy needed to explain the penumbral radiative flux.