• We present a QCD calculation of the $u$, $d$ and $s$ scalar quark contents of nucleons based on $47$ lattice ensembles with $N_f = 2+1$ dynamical sea quarks, $5$ lattice spacings down to $0.054\,\text{fm}$, lattice sizes up to $6\,\text{fm}$ and pion masses down to $120\,\text{MeV}$. Using the Feynman-Hellmann theorem, we obtain $f^N_{ud} = 0.0405(40)(35)$ and $f^N_s = 0.113(45)(40)$, which translates into $\sigma_{\pi N}=38(3)(3)\,\text{MeV}$, $\sigma_{sN}=105(41)(37)\,\text{MeV}$ and $y_N=0.20(8)(8)$ for the sigma terms and the related ratio, where the first errors are statistical and the second are systematic. Using isospin relations, we also compute the individual up and down quark contents of the proton and neutron (results in the main text).
  • By using lattice QCD computations we determine the sigma terms and strangeness content of all octet baryons by means of an application of the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. In addition to polynomial and rational expressions for the quark mass dependence of octet members, we use SU(3) covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory to perform the extrapolation to the physical up and down quark masses. Our N_f=2+1 lattice ensembles include pion masses down to about 190 MeV in large volumes (M_\pi L > 4), and three values of the lattice spacing. Our main results are the nucleon sigma term \sigma_{\pi N} = 39(4)(^{+18}_{-7}) and the strangeness content y_{N} = 0.20(7)(^{+13}_{-17}). Under the assumption of validity of covariant baryon \chi PT in our range of masses one finds y_{N} = 0.276(77)(^{+90}_{-62}).
  • The existence and stability of atoms rely on the fact that neutrons are more massive than protons. The measured mass difference is only 0.14\% of the average of the two masses. A slightly smaller or larger value would have led to a dramatically different universe. Here, we show that this difference results from the competition between electromagnetic and mass isospin breaking effects. We performed lattice quantum-chromodynamics and quantum-electrodynamics computations with four nondegenerate Wilson fermion flavors and computed the neutron-proton mass-splitting with an accuracy of $300$ kilo-electron volts, which is greater than $0$ by $5$ standard deviations. We also determine the splittings in the $\Sigma$, $\Xi$, $D$ and $\Xi_{cc}$ isospin multiplets, exceeding in some cases the precision of experimental measurements.
  • Strain is a leading candidate for controlling magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroics. Here, we use x-ray diffraction to study the coupling between magnetic order and structural distortion in epitaxial films of the orthorhombic (o-) perovskite LuMnO$_3$. An antiferromagnetic spin canting in the E-type magnetic structure is shown to be related to the ferroelectrically induced structural distortion and to a change in the magnetic propagation vector. By comparing films of different orientations and thicknesses, these quantities are found to be controlled by b-axis strain. It is shown that compressive strain destabilizes the commensurate E-type structure and reduces its accompanying ferroelectric distortion.
  • Scale setting is of central importance in lattice QCD. It is required to predict dimensional quantities in physical units. Moreover, it determines the relative lattice spacings of computations performed at different values of the bare coupling, and this is needed for extrapolating results into the continuum. Thus, we calculate a new quantity, $w_0$, for setting the scale in lattice QCD, which is based on the Wilson flow like the scale $t_0$ (M. Luscher, JHEP 1008 (2010) 071). It is cheap and straightforward to implement and compute. In particular, it does not involve the delicate fitting of correlation functions at asymptotic times. It typically can be determined on the few per-mil level. We compute its continuum extrapolated value in 2+1-flavor QCD for physical and non-physical pion and kaon masses, to allow for mass-independent scale setting even away from the physical mass point. We demonstrate its robustness by computing it with two very different actions (one of them with staggered, the other with Wilson fermions) and by showing that the results agree for physical quark masses in the continuum limit.
  • We study QCD thermodynamics using two flavors of dynamical overlap fermions with quark masses corresponding to a pion mass of 350 MeV. We determine several observables on N_t=6 and 8 lattices. All our runs are performed with fixed global topology. Our results are compared with staggered ones and a nice agreement is found.
  • Indirect CP violation in K \rightarrow {\pi}{\pi} decays plays a central role in constraining the flavor structure of the Standard Model (SM) and in the search for new physics. For many years the leading uncertainty in the SM prediction of this phenomenon was the one associated with the nonperturbative strong interaction dynamics in this process. Here we present a fully controlled lattice QCD calculation of these effects, which are described by the neutral kaon mixing parameter B_K . We use a two step HEX smeared clover-improved Wilson action, with four lattice spacings from a\approx0.054 fm to a\approx0.093 fm and pion masses at and even below the physical value. Nonperturbative renormalization is performed in the RI-MOM scheme, where we find that operator mixing induced by chiral symmetry breaking is very small. Using fully nonperturbative continuum running, we obtain our main result B_K^{RI}(3.5GeV)=0.531(6)_{stat}(2)_{sys}. A perturbative 2-loop conversion yields B_K^{MSbar-NDR}(2GeV)=0.564(6)_{stat}(3)_{sys}(6)_{PT}, which is in good agreement with current results from fits to experimental data.
  • We study the spectra of heavy-light and heavy-heavy mesons containing charm quarks, including higher spin states. We use two sets of $N_f = 2 + 1$ gauge configurations, one set from QCDSF using the SLiNC action, and the other configurations from the Budapest-Marseille-Wuppertal collaboration, using the HEX smeared clover action. To extract information about the excited states, we choose a suitable basis of operators to implement the variational method.
  • Ordinary matter is described by six fundamental parameters: three couplings (gravitational, electromagnetic and strong) and three masses: the electron's (m_e) and those of the up (m_u) and down (m_d) quarks. An additional mass enters through quantum fluctuations: the strange quark mass (m_s). The three couplings and m_e are known with an accuracy of better than a few per mil. Despite their importance, $m_u$, $m_d$ (their average m_{ud}) and m_s are relatively poorly known: e.g. the Particle Data Group quotes them with conservative errors close to 25%. Here we determine these quantities with a precision below 2% by performing ab initio lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) calculations, in which all systematics are controlled. We use pion and quark masses down to (and even below) their physical values, lattice sizes of up to 6 fm, and five lattice spacings to extrapolate to continuum spacetime. All necessary renormalizations are performed nonperturbatively.
  • Based on a series of lattice calculations we determine the ratio FK/Fpi in QCD. With experimental data from kaon decay and nuclear double beta decay, we obtain a precise determination of |Vus|. Our simulation includes 2+1 flavours of sea quarks, with three lattice spacings, large volumes and a simulated pion mass reaching down to about 190 MeV for a full control over the systematic uncertainties.
  • At the precision reached in current lattice QCD calculations, electromagnetic effects are becoming numerically relevant. We will present preliminary results for electromagnetic corrections to light hadron masses, based on simulations in which a $\mathrm{U}(1)$ degree of freedom is superimposed on $N_f=2+1$ QCD configurations from the BMW collaboration.
  • A status report is given for a joint project of the Budapest-Marseille-Wuppertal collaboration and the Regensburg group to study the quark mass-dependence of octet baryons in SU(3) Baryon XPT. This formulation is expected to extend to larger masses than Heavy-Baryon XPT. Its applicability is tested with 2+1 flavor data which cover three lattice spacings and pion masses down to about 190 MeV, in large volumes. Also polynomial and rational interpolations in M_\pi^2 and M_K^2 are used to assess the uncertainty due to the ansatz. Both frameworks are combined to explore the precision to be expected in a controlled determination of the nucleon sigma term and strangeness content.
  • While the masses of light hadrons have been extensively studied in lattice QCD simulations, there exist only a few exploratory calculations of the strong decay widths of hadronic resonances. We will present preliminary results of a computation of the rho meson width obtained using $N_f=2+1$ flavor simulations. The work is based on L\"uscher's formalism and its extension to moving frames.
  • We give details of our precise determination of the light quark masses m_{ud}=(m_u+m_d)/2 and m_s in 2+1 flavor QCD, with simulated pion masses down to 120 MeV, at five lattice spacings, and in large volumes. The details concern the action and algorithm employed, the HMC force with HEX smeared clover fermions, the choice of the scale setting procedure and of the input masses. After an overview of the simulation parameters, extensive checks of algorithmic stability, autocorrelation and (practical) ergodicity are reported. To corroborate the good scaling properties of our action, explicit tests of the scaling of hadron masses in N_f=3 QCD are carried out. Details of how we control finite volume effects through dedicated finite volume scaling runs are reported. To check consistency with SU(2) Chiral Perturbation Theory the behavior of M_\pi^2/m_{ud} and F_\pi as a function of m_{ud} is investigated. Details of how we use the RI/MOM procedure with a separate continuum limit of the running of the scalar density R_S(\mu,\mu') are given. This procedure is shown to reproduce the known value of r_0m_s in quenched QCD. Input from dispersion theory is used to split our value of m_{ud} into separate values of m_u and m_d. Finally, our procedure to quantify both systematic and statistical uncertainties is discussed.
  • We determine the ratio FK/Fpi in QCD with Nf=2+1 flavors of sea quarks, based on a series of lattice calculations with three different lattice spacings, large volumes and a simulated pion mass reaching down to about 190 MeV. We obtain FK/Fpi=1.192 +/- 0.007(stat) +/- 0.006(syst). This result is then used to give an updated value of the CKM matrix element |Vus|. The unitarity relation for the first row of this matrix is found to be well observed.
  • QPACE is a novel parallel computer which has been developed to be primarily used for lattice QCD simulations. The compute power is provided by the IBM PowerXCell 8i processor, an enhanced version of the Cell processor that is used in the Playstation 3. The QPACE nodes are interconnected by a custom, application optimized 3-dimensional torus network implemented on an FPGA. To achieve the very high packaging density of 26 TFlops per rack a new water cooling concept has been developed and successfully realized. In this paper we give an overview of the architecture and highlight some important technical details of the system. Furthermore, we provide initial performance results and report on the installation of 8 QPACE racks providing an aggregate peak performance of 200 TFlops.
  • More than 99% of the mass of the visible universe is made up of protons and neutrons. Both particles are much heavier than their quark and gluon constituents, and the Standard Model of particle physics should explain this difference. We present a full ab-initio calculation of the masses of protons, neutrons and other light hadrons, using lattice quantum chromodynamics. Pion masses down to 190 mega electronvolts are used to extrapolate to the physical point with lattice sizes of approximately four times the inverse pion mass. Three lattice spacings are used for a continuum extrapolation. Our results completely agree with experimental observations and represent a quantitative confirmation of this aspect of the Standard Model with fully controlled uncertainties.
  • We present a framework for phenomenological lattice QCD calculations which makes use of a tree level Symanzink improved action for gluons and stout-link Wilson fermions. We give details of our efficient HMC/RHMC algorithm and present a scaling study of the low-lying N_f=3 baryon spectrum. We find a scaling region that extends to a~<0.16fm and conclude that our action and algorithm are suitable for large scale phenomenological investigations of N_f=2+1 QCD. We expect this conclusion to hold for other comparable actions.
  • We give an overview of the QPACE project, which is pursuing the development of a massively parallel, scalable supercomputer for LQCD. The machine is a three-dimensional torus of identical processing nodes, based on the PowerXCell 8i processor. The nodes are connected by an FPGA-based, application-optimized network processor attached to the PowerXCell 8i processor. We present a performance analysis of lattice QCD codes on QPACE and corresponding hardware benchmarks.
  • We evaluate IBM's Enhanced Cell Broadband Engine (BE) as a possible building block of a new generation of lattice QCD machines. The Enhanced Cell BE will provide full support of double-precision floating-point arithmetics, including IEEE-compliant rounding. We have developed a performance model and applied it to relevant lattice QCD kernels. The performance estimates are supported by micro- and application-benchmarks that have been obtained on currently available Cell BE-based computers, such as IBM QS20 blades and PlayStation 3. The results are encouraging and show that this processor is an interesting option for lattice QCD applications. For a massively parallel machine on the basis of the Cell BE, an application-optimized network needs to be developed.
  • We present two improvements to our previous dynamical overlap HMC algorithm. We introduce a new method of differentiating the eigenvectors of the Kernel operator, which removes an instability in the fermionic force. Secondly, by simulating part of the fermion determinant exactly, without pseudo-fermions, we are able to increase the rate of topological tunnelling by a factor of more than ten, reducing the auto-correlation.
  • A complete description of the nucleon structure in terms of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) at twist 2 level requires the measurement/computation of the eight functions H, E, \tilde H, \tilde E, H_T, E_T, \tilde H_T and \tilde E_T, all depending on the three variables x, \xi and t. In this talk, we present and discuss our first steps in the framework of lattice QCD towards this enormous task. Dynamical lattice QCD results for the lowest three Mellin moments of the helicity dependent and independent GPDs are shown in terms of their corresponding generalized form factors. Implications for the transverse coordinate space structure of the nucleon as well as the orbital angular momentum (OAM) contribution of quarks to the nucleon spin are discussed in some detail.
  • The aim of the GRAL project is to simulate full QCD with standard Wilson fermions at light quark masses on small to medium-sized lattices and to obtain infinite-volume results by extrapolation. In order to establish the functional form of the volume dependence we study systematically the finite-size effects in the light hadron spectrum. We give an update on the status of the GRAL project and show that our simulation data for the light hadron masses depend exponentially on the lattice size.
  • Moments of the quark density distribution, moments of the quark helicity distribution, and the tensor charge are calculated in full QCD. Calculations of matrix elements of operators from the operator product expansion have been performed on $16^3 \times 32$ lattices for Wilson fermions at $\beta = 5.6$ using configurations from the SESAM collaboration and at $\beta = 5.5$ using configurations from SCRI. One-loop perturbative renormalization corrections are included. Selected results are compared with corresponding quenched calculations and with calculations using cooled configurations.
  • We present the results of a full QCD lattice calculation of the flavor singlet axial vector coupling $G_A^1$ of the proton. The simulation has been carried out on a $16^3\times 32$ lattice at $\beta=5.6$ with $n_f=2$ dynamical Wilson fermions. It turns out that the statistical quality of the connected contribution to $G_A^1$ is excellent, whereas the disconnected part is accessible but suffers from large statistical fluctuations. Using a 1st order tadpole improved renormalization constant $Z_A$, we estimate $G_A^1 = 0.20(12)$.