• Sandwich-type MgB2 Josephson tunnel junctions (MgB2/AlOx/MgB2) have been fabricated using as-grown MgB2 films formed by molecular beam epitaxy. The junctions exhibited substantial supercurrent and a well-defined superconducting gap (D=2.2~2.3mV). The superconducting gap voltage (D) agrees well with those of the smaller gap in the multi-gap scenario. The IcRN product is 0.4-1.3 mV at 4.2K, but approaches to 2.0 mV at 50 mK. The Ic has peculiar temperature dependence far from the Ambegaokar-Baratoff formula. It rapidly decreases with temperature, and disappears above T = 20 K, which is much lower than the gap closing temperature. Interface microstructure between AlOx and MgB2 were investigated using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy to clarify the problems in our tunnel junctions. There are poor-crystalline MgB2 layers and/or amorphous Mg-B composite layers of a few nanometers between AlOx barrier and the upper MgB2 layer. The poor-crystalline upper Mg-B layers seem to behave as normal metal or deteriorated superconducting layers, which may be the principal reason for all non-idealities of our MgB2/AlOx/MgB2 junctions.
  • We have grown NdBa2Cu3O7-d films under silver atomic flux by molecular beam epitaxy, which show a drastic improvement in microstructure and also crystallinity leading to 30 % enhancement in critical current density. The most remarkable point is that the final film is free from silver. The key to our process in achieving a silver-free film was the use of RF-activated oxygen that oxidizes silver, nonvolatile, to silver oxide, volatile at the deposition temperature. This process enables one to utilize the beneficial effects of silver in the growth of oxide films and at the same time ensures that the final film be free from silver, which is important for high-frequency applications. This method can be made use in the growth of thin films of other complex oxide materials.
  • Sandwich-type all-MgB2 Josephson tunnel junctions (MgB2/AlOx/MgB2) have been fabricated for the first time with as-grown MgB2 films formed by molecular beam epitaxy. The junctions exhibit substantial superconducting current (IcRN product ~ 0.8 mV at 4.2K), a well-defined superconducting gap (delta = ~2.3 mV), and clear Fraunhofer patterns. The superconducting gap voltage of delta agrees well with the smaller gap in the multi-gap scenario. The results demonstrate that MgB2 has great promise for superconducting electronics that can be operated at T ~ 20 K.