• In III-V semiconductor nano-structures the electron and nuclear spin dynamics are strongly coupled. Both spin systems can be controlled optically. The nuclear spin dynamics is widely studied, but little is known about the initialization mechanisms. Here we investigate optical pumping of carrier and nuclear spins in charge tunable GaAs dots grown on 111A substrates. We demonstrate dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at zero magnetic field in a single quantum dot for the positively charged exciton X$^+$ state transition. We tune the DNP in both amplitude and sign by variation of an applied bias voltage V$_g$. Variation of $\Delta$V$_g$ of the order of 100 mV changes the Overhauser splitting (nuclear spin polarization) from -30 $\mu$eV (-22 %) to +10 $\mu$eV (+7 %), although the X$^+$ photoluminescence polarization does not change sign over this voltage range. This indicates that absorption in the structure and energy relaxation towards the X$^+$ ground state might provide favourable scenarios for efficient electron-nuclear spin flip-flops, generating DNP during the first tens of ps of the X$^+$ lifetime which is of the order of hundreds of ps. Voltage control of DNP is further confirmed in Hanle experiments.
  • Electron spin transport and dynamics are investigated in a single, high-mobility, modulation-doped, GaAs quantum well using ultrafast two-color Kerr-rotation micro-spectroscopy, supported by qualitative kinetic theory simulations of spin diffusion and transport. Evolution of the spins is governed by the Dresselhaus bulk and Rashba structural inversion asymmetries, which manifest as an effective magnetic field that can be extracted directly from the experimental coherent spin precession. A spin precession length L-SOI is defined as one complete precession in the effective magnetic field. It is observed that application of (a) an out-of-plane electric field changes the spin decay time and L-SOI through the Rashba component of the spin-orbit coupling, (b) an in-plane magnetic field allows for extraction of the Dresselhaus and Rashba parameters, and (c) an in-plane electric field markedly modifies both the L-SOI and diffusion coefficient. While simulations reproduce the main features of the experiments, the latter results exceed the corresponding simulations and extend previous studies of drift-current-dependent spin-orbit interactions.
  • By using a C3v symmetric (111) surface as a growth substrate, we are able to achieve high structural symmetry in self-assembled quantum dots, which are suitable for use as quantum-entangled photon emitters. Here we report on the wavelength controllability of InAs dots on InP(111)A, which we realized by tuning the ternary alloy composition of In(Al,Ga)As barriers that were lattice-matched to InP. We changed the peak emission wavelength systematically from 1.3 to 1.7 micrometer by barrier band gap tuning. The observed spectral shift agreed with the result of numerical simulations that assumed a measured shape distribution independent of barrier choice.
  • In self assembled III-V semiconductor quantum dots, valence holes have longer spin coherence times than the conduction electrons, due to their weaker coupling to nuclear spin bath fluctuations. Prolonging hole spin stability relies on a better understanding of the hole to nuclear spin hyperfine coupling which we address both in experiment and theory in the symmetric (111) GaAs/AlGaAs droplet dots. In magnetic fields applied along the growth axis, we create a strong nuclear spin polarization detected through the positively charged trion X$^+$ Zeeman and Overhauser splittings. The observation of four clearly resolved photoluminescence lines - a unique property of the (111) nanosystems - allows us to measure separately the electron and hole contribution to the Overhauser shift. The hyperfine interaction for holes is found to be about five times weaker than that for electrons. Our theory shows that this ratio depends not only on intrinsic material properties but also on the dot shape and carrier confinement through the heavy-hole mixing, an opportunity for engineering the hole-nuclear spin interaction by tuning dot size and shape.
  • We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of highly charged and excited electron-hole complexes in strain-free (111) GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots grown by droplet epitaxy. We address the complexes with one of the charge carriers residing in the excited state, namely, the ``hot'' trions X$^{-*}$ and X$^{+*}$, and the doubly negatively charged exciton X$^{2-}$. Our magneto-photoluminescence experiments performed on single quantum dots in the Faraday geometry uncover characteristic emission patterns for each excited electron-hole complex, which are very different from the photoluminescence spectra observed in (001)-grown quantum dots. We present a detailed theory of the fine structure and magneto-photoluminescence spectra of X$^{-*}$, X$^{+*}$ and X$^{2-}$ complexes, governed by the interplay between the electron-hole Coulomb exchange interaction and the heavy-hole mixing, characteristic for these quantum dots with a trigonal symmetry. Comparison between experiment and theory of the magneto-photoluminescence allows for precise charge state identification, as well as extraction of electron-hole exchange interaction constants and $g$-factors for the charge carriers occupying excited states.
  • Making use of droplet epitaxy, we systematically controlled the height of self-assembled GaAs quantum dots by more than one order of magnitude. The photoluminescence spectra of single quantum dots revealed the strong dependence of the spectral linewidth on the dot height. Tall dots with a height of ~30 nm showed broad spectral peaks with an average width as large as ~5 meV, but shallow dots with a height of ~2 nm showed resolution-limited spectral lines (<120 micro eV). The measured height dependence of the linewidths is in good agreement with Stark coefficients calculated for the experimental shape variation. We attribute the microscopic source of fluctuating electric fields to the random motion of surface charges at the vacuum-semiconductor interface. Our results offer guidelines for creating frequency-locked photon sources, which will serve as key devices for long-distance quantum key distribution.
  • We demonstrate Werner-like polarization-entangled state generation disapproving local hidden variable theory from a single semiconductor quantum dot. By exploiting tomographic analysis with temporal gating, we find biphoton states are mapped on the Werner state, which is crucial for quantum information applications due to its versatile ramifications such as usefulness to teleportation. Observed time evolution of the biphoton state brings us systematic understanding on a relationship between tomographically reconstructed biphoton state and a set of parameters characterizing exciton state including fine-structure splitting and cross-dephasing time.
  • We demonstrate charge tuning in strain free GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown by droplet epitaxy on a GaAs(111)A substrate. Application of a bias voltage allows the controlled charging of the QDs from $-3|e|$ to $+2|e|$. The resulting changes in QD emission energy and exciton fine-structure are recorded in micro-photoluminescence experiments at T=4K. We uncover the existence of excited valence and conduction states, in addition to the s-shell-like ground state. We record a second series of emission lines about 25meV above the charged exciton emission coming from excited charged excitons. For these excited interband transitions a negative diamagnetic shift of large amplitude is uncovered in longitudinal magnetic fields.
  • The emission cascade of a single quantum dot is a promising source of entangled photons. A prerequisite for this source is the use of a symmetric dot analogous to an atom in a vacuum, but the simultaneous achievement of structural symmetry and emission in a telecom band poses a challenge. Here we report the growth and characterization of highly symmetric InAs/InAlAs quantum dots self-assembled on C3v symmetric InP(111)A. The broad emission spectra cover the O (1.3 micron-m), C (1.55 micron-m), and L (1.6 micron-m) telecom bands. The distribution of the fine-structure splittings is considerably smaller than those reported in previous works on dots at similar wavelengths. The presence of dots with degenerate exciton lines is further confirmed by the optical orientation technique. Thus, our dot systems are expected to serve as efficient entangled photon emitters for long-distance fiber-based quantum key distribution.
  • Optical and electrical control of the nuclear spin system allows enhancing the sensitivity of NMR applications and spin-based information storage and processing. Dynamic nuclear polarization in semiconductors is commonly achieved in the presence of a stabilizing external magnetic field. Here we report efficient optical pumping of nuclear spins at zero magnetic field in strain free GaAs quantum dots. The strong interaction of a single, optically injected electron spin with the nuclear spins acts as a stabilizing, effective magnetic field (Knight field) on the nuclei. We optically tune the Knight field amplitude and direction. In combination with a small transverse magnetic field, we are able to control the longitudinal and transverse component of the nuclear spin polarization in the absence of lattice strain i.e. nuclear quadrupole effects, as reproduced by our model calculations.
  • An ideal source of entangled photon pairs combines the perfect symmetry of an atom with the convenient electrical trigger of light sources based on semiconductor quantum dots. We create a naturally symmetric quantum dot cascade that emits highly entangled photon pairs on demand. Our source consists of strain-free GaAs dots self-assembled on a triangular symmetric (111)A surface. The emitted photons strongly violate Bell's inequality and reveal a fidelity to the Bell state as high as 86 (+-2) % without postselection. This result is an important step towards scalable quantum-communication applications with efficient sources.
  • We present a microscopic theory of the magnetic field induced mixing of heavy-hole states +/- 3/2 in GaAs droplet dots grown on (111)A substrates. The proposed theoretical model takes into account the striking dot shape with trigonal symmetry revealed in atomic force microscopy. Our calculations of the hole states are carried out within the Luttinger Hamiltonian formalism, supplemented with allowance for the triangularity of the confining potential. They are in quantitative agreement with the experimentally observed polarization selection rules, emission line intensities and energy splittings in both longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields for neutral and charged excitons in all measured single dots.
  • In photoluminescence spectra of symmetric [111] grown GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots in longitudinal magnetic fields applied along the growth axis we observe in addition to the expected bright states also nominally dark transitions for both charged and neutral excitons. We uncover a strongly non-monotonous, sign changing field dependence of the bright neutral exciton splitting resulting from the interplay between exchange and Zeeman effects. Our theory shows quantitatively that these surprising experimental results are due to magnetic-field-induced \pm 3/2 heavy-hole mixing, an inherent property of systems with C_3v point-group symmetry.
  • In this cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy study we investigated various techniques to control the shape of self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) and wetting layers (WLs). The result shows that application of an indium flush during the growth of strained InGaAs/GaAs QD layers results in flattened QDs and a reduced WL. The height of the QDs and WLs could be controlled by varying the thickness of the first capping layer. Concerning the technique of antimony capping we show that the surfactant properties of Sb result in the preservation of the shape of strained InAs/InP QDs during overgrowth. This could be achieved by both a growth interrupt under Sb flux and capping with a thin GaAsSb layer prior to overgrowth of the uncapped QDs. The technique of droplet epitaxy was investigated by a structural analysis of strain free GaAs/AlGaAs QDs. We show that the QDs have a Gaussian shape, that the WL is less than 1 bilayer thick, and that minor intermixing of Al with the QDs takes place.
  • We report strong heavy hole-light mixing in GaAs quantum dots grown by droplet epitaxy. Using the neutral and charged exciton emission as a monitor we observe the direct consequence of quantum dot symmetry reduction in this strain free system. By fitting the polar diagram of the emission with simple analytical expressions obtained from k$\cdot$p theory we are able to extract the mixing that arises from the heavy-light hole coupling due to the geometrical asymmetry of the quantum dot.
  • We study photon bunching phenomena associated with biexciton-exciton cascade in single GaAs self-assembled quantum dots. Experiments carried out with a pulsed excitation source show that significant bunching is only detectable at very low excitation, where the typical intensity of photon streams is less than the half of their saturation value. Our findings are qualitatively understood with a model which accounts for Poissonian statistics in the number of excitons, predicting the height of a bunching peak being determined by the inverse of probability of finding more than one exciton.
  • We report on photon coincidence measurement in a single GaAs self-assembled quantum dot (QD) using a pulsed excitation light source. At low excitation, when a neutral exciton line was present in the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum, we observed nearly perfect single photon emission from an isolated QD at 670 nm wavelength. For higher excitation, multiple PL lines appeared on the spectra, reflecting the formation of exciton complexes. Cross-correlation functions between these lines showed either bunching or antibunching behavior, depending on whether the relevant emission was from a biexciton cascade or a charged exciton recombination.
  • We report on a new approach to detect excitonic qubits in semiconductor quantum dots by observing spontaneous emissions from the relevant qubit level. The ground state of excitons is resonantly excited by picosecond optical pulses. Emissions from the same state are temporally resolved with picosecond time resolution. To capture weak emissions, we greatly suppress the elastic scattering of excitation beams, by applying obliquely incident geometry to the micro photoluminescence set-up. Rabi oscillations of the ground-state excitons appear to be involved in the dependence of emission intensity on excitation amplitude.
  • We report the fabrication of self-assembled, strain-free GaAs/Al$_{0.27}$Ga$_{0.73}$As quantum dot pairs which are laterally aligned in the growth plane, utilizing the droplet epitaxy technique and the anisotropic surface potentials of the GaAs (100) surface for the migration of Ga adatoms. Photoluminescence spectra from a single quantum dot pair, consisting of a doublet, have been observed. Finite element energy level calculations of a model quantum dot pair are also presented.
  • Making use of a droplet-epitaxial technique, we realize nanometer-sized quantum ring complexes, consisting of a well-defined inner ring and an outer ring. Electronic structure inherent in the unique quantum system is analyzed using a micro-photoluminescence technique. One advantage of our growth method is that it presents the possibility of varying the ring geometry. Two samples are prepared and studied: a single-wall ring and a concentric double-ring. For both samples, highly efficient photoluminescence emitted from a single quantum structure is detected. The spectra show discrete resonance lines, which reflect the quantized nature of the ring-type electronic states. In the concentric double--ring, the carrier confinement in the inner ring and that in the outer ring are identified distinctly as split lines. The observed spectra are interpreted on the basis of single electron effective mass calculations.