• We present a far-IR survey of the entire Mon R2 GMC with $Herschel-SPIRE$ cross-calibrated with $Planck-HFI$ data. We fit the SEDs of each pixel with a greybody function and an optimal beta value of 1.8. We find that mid-range column densities obtained from far-IR dust emission and near-IR extinction are consistent. For the entire GMC, we find that the column density histogram, or N-PDF, is lognormal below $\sim$10$^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$. Above this value, the distribution takes a power law form with an index of -2.16. We analyze the gas geometry, N-PDF shape, and YSO content of a selection of subregions in the cloud. We find no regions with pure lognormal N-PDFs. The regions with a combination of lognormal and one power law N-PDF have a YSO cluster and a corresponding centrally concentrated gas clump. The regions with a combination of lognormal and two power law N-PDF have significant numbers of typically younger YSOs but no prominent YSO cluster. These regions are composed of an aggregate of closely spaced gas filaments with no concentrated dense gas clump. We find that for our fixed scale regions, the YSO count roughly correlates with the N-PDF power law index. The correlation appears steeper for single power law regions relative to two power law regions with a high column density cut-off, as a greater dense gas mass fraction is achieved in the former. A stronger correlation is found between embedded YSO count and the dense gas mass among our regions.
  • We present initial results from time series imaging at infrared wavelengths of 0.9 sq. degrees in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). During Fall 2009 we obtained 81 epochs of Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 micron data over 40 consecutive days. We extracted light curves with ~3% photometric accuracy for ~2000 ONC members ranging from several solar masses down to well below the hydrogen burning mass limit. For many of the stars, we also have time-series photometry obtained at optical (Ic) and/or near-infrared (JKs) wavelengths. Our data set can be mined to determine stellar rotation periods, identify new pre-main-sequence (PMS) eclipsing binaries, search for new substellar Orion members, and help better determine the frequency of circumstellar disks as a function of stellar mass in the ONC. Our primary focus is the unique ability of 3.6 & 4.5 micron variability information to improve our understanding of inner disk processes and structure in the Class I and II young stellar objects (YSOs). In this paper, we provide a brief overview of the YSOVAR Orion data obtained in Fall 2009, and we highlight our light curves for AA-Tau analogs - YSOs with narrow dips in flux, most probably due to disk density structures passing through our line of sight. Detailed follow-up observations are needed in order to better quantify the nature of the obscuring bodies and what this implies for the structure of the inner disks of YSOs.
  • Spitzer and Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) images and spectrophotometry of epsilon Eridani at wavelengths from 3.5 to 350 um reveal new details of its bright debris disk. The 350 um map confirms the presence of a ring at r = 11-28 arcsec (35-90 AU) observed previously at longer sub-mm wavelengths. The Spitzer mid- and far-IR images do not show the ring, but rather a featureless disk extending from within a few arcsec of the star across the ring to r ~ 34 arcsec (110 AU). The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the debris system implies a complex structure. A model constrained by the surface brightness profiles and the SED indicates that the sub-mm ring emission is primarily from large (a ~ 135 um) grains, with smaller (a ~ 15 um) grains also present in and beyond the ring. The Spitzer IRS and MIPS SED-mode spectrophotometry data clearly show the presence of spatially compact excess emission at lambda > 15 um that requires the presence of two additional narrow belts of dust within the sub-mm ring's central void. The innermost belt at r ~ 3 AU is composed of silicate dust. A simple dynamical model suggests that dust produced collisionally by a population of about 11 M_Earth of planetesimals in the sub-mm ring could be the source of the emission from both in and beyond the sub-mm ring. Maintaining the inner belts and the inner edge to the sub-mm ring may require the presence of three planets in this system including the candidate radial velocity object.
  • Although most young massive stars appear to be part of multiple systems, it is poorly understood how this multiplicity influences the formation of massive stars. The high-mass star-forming region W3 IRS5 is a prime example of a young massive cluster where the cluster center is resolved into multiple subsources at cm and infrared wavelengths, a potential proto-Trapezium system. The region W3 IRS5 was mapped with the PdBI at 1.4mm and 3.4mm in the AB configurations, observing shock-tracing SiO and SO_2 emission. In the continuum we detect five sources, one of them for the first time, while counterparts were detected in the NIR, MIR or at radio wavelengths for the remaining four sources. Three of the detected sources are within the inner 2100AU, where the protostellar number density exceeds 10^6 protostars pc^-3 assuming spherical symmetry. Lower limits for the circumstellar masses of the detected sources were calculated, although they were strongly affected by the spatial filtering of the interferometer. However, the projected separations of the sources ranging between ~750 and ~4700AU indicate a multiple, Trapezium-like system. We detected five molecular outflows in SiO, two of them nearly in the line of sight direction, which allowed us to see the collapsing protostars in the NIR through the cavities carved by the outflows. The SO_2 velocity structure indicates a rotating, bound system, and we find tentative signatures of converging flows as predicted by the gravoturbulent star formation and converging flow theories. The obtained data strongly indicate that the clustered environment has a major influence on the formation of high-mass stars; however, our data do not clearly allow us to distinguish whether the ongoing star-forming process follows a monolithic collapse or a competitive accretion mechanism.
  • We present multi-wavelength optical and infrared photometry of 170 previously known low mass stars and brown dwarfs of the 5 Myr Collinder 69 cluster (Lambda Orionis). The new photometry supports cluster membership for most of them, with less than 15% of the previous candidates identified as probable non-members. The near infrared photometry allows us to identify stars with IR excesses, and we find that the Class II population is very large, around 25% for stars (in the spectral range M0 - M6.5) and 40% for brown dwarfs, down to 0.04 Msun, despite the fact that the H(alpha) equivalent width is low for a significant fraction of them. In addition, there are a number of substellar objects, classified as Class III, that have optically thin disks. The Class II members are distributed in an inhomogeneous way, lying preferentially in a filament running toward the south-east. The IR excesses for the Collinder 69 members range from pure Class II (flat or nearly flat spectra longward of 1 micron), to transition disks with no near-IR excess but excesses beginning within the IRAC wavelength range, to two stars with excess only detected at 24 micron. Collinder 69 thus appears to be at an age where it provides a natural laboratory for the study of primordial disks and their dissipation.
  • We report new Spitzer Space Telescope observations from the IRAC and MIPS instruments of the young (~ 3 Myr) sigma Orionis cluster. We identify 336 stars as members of the cluster using optical and near-infrared color magnitude diagrams. Using the spectral energy distribution (SED) slopes in the IRAC spectral range, we place objects in several classes: non-excess stars, stars with optically thick disks(like classical T Tauri stars), class I (protostellar) candidates, and stars with ``evolved disks''; the last exhibit smaller IRAC excesses than optically thick disk systems. In general, this classification agrees with the location expected in IRAC-MIPS color-color diagrams for these objects. We find that the evolved disk systems are mostly a combination of objects with optically thick but non-flared disks, suggesting grain growth and/or settling, and transition disks, systems in which the inner disk is partially or fully cleared of small dust. In all, we identify 7 transition disk candidates and 3 possible debris disk systems. As in other young stellar populations, the fraction of disks depends on the stellar mass, ranging from ~10% for stars in the Herbig Ae/Be mass range (>2 msun) to ~35% in the T Tauri mass range (1-0.1 msun). We find that the disk fraction does not decrease significantly toward the brown dwarf candidates (<0.1 msun). The IRAC infrared excesses found in stellar clusters and associations with and without central high mass stars are similar, suggesting that external photoevaporation is not very important in many clusters. Finally, we find no correlation between the X-ray luminosity and the disk infrared excess, suggesting that the X-rays are not strongly affected by disk accretion.
  • We present near and mid-infrared photometry obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope of 300 known members of the IC348 cluster. We merge this photometry with existing ground-based optical and near-infrared photometry in order to construct optical-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for all the cluster members and present a complete atlas of these SEDs. We employ these observations to both investigate the frequency and nature of the circumstellar disk population in the cluster. The observations are sufficiently sensitive to enable the first detailed measurement of the disk frequency for very low mass stars at the peak of the stellar IMF. Using measurements of infrared excess between 3.6 and 8 microns we find the total frequency of disk-bearing stars in the cluster to be 50 +/- 6%. However, only 30 +/- 4% of the member stars are surrounded by optically thick, primordial disks, while the remaining disk-bearing stars are surrounded by what appear to be optically thin,anemic disks. The disk fraction appears to be a function of spectral type and stellar mass. The disk longevity and thus conditions for planet formation appear to be most favorable for stars which are of comparable mass to the sun. The optically thick disks around later type (> M4) stars appear to be less flared than the disks around earlier type stars. This may indicate a greater degree of dust settling and a more advanced evolutionary state for the late M disk population. Finally we find that the presence of an optically thick dust disk is correlated with gaseous accretion as measured by the strength of Halpha emission. These results suggest that it is more likely for dust disks to persist in the absence of active gaseous accretion than for active accretion to persist in the absence of dusty disks.
  • We present a sequence of I-band images obtained at the Venezuela 1m Schmidt telescope during the outburst of the nebula recently discovered by J.W. McNeil in the Orion L1630 molecular cloud. We derive photometry spanning the pre-outburst state and the brightening itself, a unique record including 14 epochs and spanning a time scale of ~5 years. We constrain the beginning of the outburst at some time between Oct. 28 and Nov. 15, 2003. The light curve of the object at the vertex of the nebula, the likely exciting source of the outburst, reveals that it has brightened ~5 magnitudes in about 4 months. The time scale for the nebula to develop is consistent with the light travel time, indicating that we are observing light from the central source scattered by the ambient cloud into the line of sight. We also show recent FLWO optical spectroscopy of the exciting source and of the nearby HH 22. The spectrum of the source is highly reddened; in contrast, the spectrum of HH 22 shows a shock spectrum superimposed on a continuum, most likely due to reflected light from the exciting source reaching the HH object through a much less reddened path. The blue portion of this spectrum is consistent with an early B spectral type, similar to the early outburst spectrum of the FU Ori variable V1057 Cyg; we estimate a luminosity of L ~219 Lsun. The eruptive behavior of the McNeil nebula source, its spectroscopic characteristics and luminosity, suggest we may be witnessing an FU Ori event on its way to maximum. Further monitoring of this object will decide whether it qualifies as a member of this rare class of objects.