• We have investigated the superconducting gap of optimally doped Ba(Fe$_{0.65}$Ru$_{0.35}$)$_2$As$_2$ by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (APRES) using bulk-sensitive 7 eV laser and synchrotron radiation. It was found that the gap is isotropic in the $k_x$-$k_y$ plane both on the electron and hole Fermi surfaces (FSs). The gap magnitudes of two resolved hole FSs show similar $k_z$ dependences and decrease as $k_z$ approaches $\sim$ 2$\pi$/$c$ (i.e., around the Z point) unlike the other Fe-based superconductors reported so far, where the superconducting gap of only one hole FS shows a strong $k_z$ dependence. This unique gap structure can be understood in the scenario that the $d_{z^2}$ orbital character is mixed into both hole FSs due to the finite spin-orbit coupling between almost degenerate FSs and is reproduced by calculations within the random phase approximation including the spin-orbit coupling.
  • The iron chalcogenide Fe$_{1+y}$Te$_{1-x}$Se$_{x}$ on the Te-rich side is known to exhibit the strongest electron correlations among the Fe-based superconductors, and is non-superconducting for $x$ < 0.1. In order to understand the origin of such behaviors, we have performed ARPES studies of Fe$_{1+y}$Te$_{1-x}$Se$_{x}$ ($x$ = 0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4). The obtained mass renormalization factors for different energy bands are qualitatively consistent with DFT + DMFT calculations. Our results provide evidence for strong orbital dependence of mass renormalization, and systematic data which help us to resolve inconsistencies with other experimental data. The unusually strong orbital dependence of mass renormalization in Te-rich Fe$_{1+y}$Te$_{1-x}$Se$_{x}$ arises from the dominant contribution to the Fermi surface of the $d_{xy}$ band, which is the most strongly correlated and may contribute to the suppression of superconductivity.
  • We have studied the anisotropy in the in-plane resistivity and the electronic structure of isovalent Ru-substituted BaFe$_2$As$_2$ in the antiferromagnetic-orthorhombic phase using well-annealed crystals. The anisotropy in the residual resistivity component increases in proportional to the Ru dopant concentration, as in the case of Co-doped compounds. On the other hand, both the residual resistivity and the resistivity anisotropy induced by isovalent Ru substitution is found to be one order of magnitude smaller than those induced by heterovalent Co substitution. Combined with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy results, which show almost the same anisotropic band structure both for the parent and Ru-substituted compounds, we confirm the scenario that the anisotropy in the residual resistivity arises from anisotropic impurity scattering in the magneto-structurally ordered phase rather than directly from the anisotropic band structure of that phase.
  • We systematically investigated the anisotropic in-plane resistivity of the iron telluride including three kinds of impurity atoms: excess Fe, Se substituted for Te, and Cu substituted for Fe. Sizable resistivity anisotropy was found in the magneto-structurally ordered phase whereas the sign is opposite ($\rho_a$ $>$ $\rho_b$, where the $b$-axis parameter is shorter than the $a$-axis one) to that observed in the transition-metal doped iron arsenides ($\rho_a$ $<$ $\rho_b$). On the other hand, our results demonstrate that the magnitude of the resistivity anisotropy in the iron tellurides is correlated with the amount of impurities, implying that the resistivity anisotropy originates from an exotic impurity effect like that in the iron arsenides. This suggests that the anisotropic carrier scattering by impurities is a universal phenomenon in the magneto-structurally ordered phase of the iron-based materials.