• Octupole deformation and the relevant spectroscopic properties of neutron-rich odd-mass barium isotopes are investigated in a theoretical framework based on nuclear density functional theory and the particle-core coupling scheme. The interacting-boson Hamiltonian that describes the octupole-deformed even-even core nucleus, as well as the single-particle energies and occupation probabilities of an unpaired nucleon, are completely determined by microscopic axially-symmetric $(\beta_{2},\beta_{3})$-deformation constrained self-consistent mean-field calculations for a specific choice of the energy density functional and pairing interaction. A boson-fermion interaction that involves both quadrupole and octupole degrees of freedom is introduced, and their strength parameters are determined to reproduce selected spectroscopic data for the odd-mass nuclei. The model reproduces recent experimental results both for the even-even and odd-mass Ba isotopes. In particular, for $^{145,147}$Ba our results indicate, in agreement with recent data, that octupole deformation does not determine the structure of the lowest states in the vicinity of the ground state, and only becomes relevant at higher excitation energies.
  • The lowest positive- and negative-parity bands of $^{20}$Ne and neutron-rich even-even Ne isotopes are investigated using a theoretical framework based on energy density functionals. Starting from a self-consistent relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov calculation of axially-symmetric and reflection-asymmetric deformation energy surfaces, the collective symmetry-conserving states are built using projection techniques and the generator coordinate method. Overall a good agreement with the experimental excitation energies and transition rates is obtained. In particular, the model provides an accurate description of the excitation spectra and transition probabilities in $^{20}$Ne. The contribution of cluster configurations to the low-energy states is discussed, as well as the transitional character of the ground state. The analysis is extended to $^{22}$Ne and the shape-coexisting isotope $^{24}$Ne, and to the drip-line nuclei $^{32}$Ne and $^{34}$Ne. The role of valence neutrons in the formation of molecular-type bonds between clusters is discussed.
  • Static and dynamic aspects of the fission process of $^{226}$Th are analyzed in a self-consistent framework based on relativistic energy density functionals. Constrained relativistic mean-field (RMF) calculations in the collective space of axially symmetric quadrupole and octupole deformations, based on the energy density functional PC-PK1 and a $\delta$-force pairing, are performed to determine the potential energy surface of the fissioning nucleus, the scission line, the single-nucleon wave functions, energies and occupation probabilities, as functions of deformation parameters. Induced fission dynamics is described using the time-dependent generator coordinate method in the Gaussian overlap approximation. A collective Schr\"odinger equation, determined entirely by the microscopic single-nucleon degrees of freedom, propagates adiabatically in time the initial wave packet built by boosting the ground-state solution of the collective Hamiltonian for $^{226}$Th. The position of the scission line and the microscopic input for the collective Hamiltonian are analyzed as functions of the strength of the pairing interaction. The effect of static pairing correlations on the pre-neutron emission charge yields and total kinetic energy of fission fragments is examined in comparison with available data, and the distribution of fission fragments is analyzed for different values of the initial excitation energy.
  • Quantum phase transitions between competing equilibrium shapes of nuclei with an odd number of nucleons are explored using a microscopic framework of nuclear energy density functionals and a particle-boson core coupling model. The boson Hamiltonian for the even-even core nucleus, as well as the spherical single-particle energies and occupation probabilities of unpaired nucleons, are completely determined by a constrained self-consistent mean-field calculation for a specific choice of the energy density functional and pairing interaction. Only the strength parameters of the particle-core coupling have to be adjusted to reproduce a few empirical low-energy spectroscopic properties of the corresponding odd-mass system. The model is applied to the odd-A Ba, Xe, La and Cs isotopes with mass $A\approx 130$, for which the corresponding even-even Ba and Xe nuclei present a typical case of $\gamma$-soft nuclear potential. The theoretical results reproduce the experimental low-energy excitation spectra and electromagnetic properties, and confirm that a phase transition between nearly spherical and $\gamma$-soft nuclear shapes occurs also in the odd-A systems.
  • Coexistence of different geometric shapes at low energies presents a universal structure phenomenon that occurs over the entire chart of nuclides. Studies of the shape coexistence are important for understanding the microscopic origin of collectivity and modifications of shell structure in exotic nuclei far from stability. The aim of this work is to provide a systematic analysis of characteristic signatures of coexisting nuclear shapes in different mass regions, using a global self-consistent theoretical method based on universal energy density functionals and the quadrupole collective model. The low-energy excitation spectrum and quadrupole shape invariants of the two lowest $0^{+}$ states of even-even nuclei are obtained as solutions of a five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian (5DCH) model, with parameters determined by constrained self-consistent mean-field calculations based on the relativistic energy density functional PC-PK1, and a finite-range pairing interaction. The theoretical excitation energies of the states: $2^+_1$, $4^+_1$, $0^+_2$, $2^+_2$, $2^+_3$, as well as the $B(E2; 0^+_1\to 2^+_1)$ values, are in very good agreement with the corresponding experimental values for 621 even-even nuclei. Quadrupole shape invariants have been implemented to investigate shape coexistence, and the distribution of possible shape-coexisting nuclei is consistent with results obtained in recent theoretical studies and available data. The present analysis has shown that, when based on a universal and consistent microscopic framework of nuclear density functionals, shape invariants provide distinct indicators and reliable predictions for the occurrence of low-energy coexisting shapes. This method is particularly useful for studies of shape coexistence in regions far from stability where few data are available.
  • Quantum phase transitions between competing ground-state shapes of atomic nuclei with an odd number of protons or neutrons are investigated in a microscopic framework based on nuclear energy density functional theory and the particle-plus-boson-core coupling scheme. The boson-core Hamiltonian, as well as the single-particle energies and occupation probabilities of the unpaired nucleon, are completely determined by constrained self-consistent mean-field calculations for a specific choice of the energy density functional and paring interaction, and only the strength parameters of the particle-core coupling are adjusted to reproduce selected spectroscopic properties of the odd-mass system. We apply this method to odd-A Eu and Sm isotopes with neutron number $N \approx 90$, and explore the influence of the single unpaired fermion on the occurrence of a shape phase transition. Collective wave functions of low-energy states are used to compute quantities that can be related to quantum order parameters: deformations, excitation energies, E2 transition rates and separation energies, and their evolution with the control parameter (neutron number) is analysed.
  • A novel method for calculating spectroscopic properties of medium-mass and heavy atomic nuclei with an odd number of nucleons is introduced, based on the framework of nuclear energy density functional theory and the particle-core coupling scheme. The deformation energy surface of the even-even core, as well as the spherical single-particle energies and occupation probabilities of the odd particle(s), are obtained in a self-consistent mean-field calculation determined by the choice of the energy density functional and pairing interaction. This method uniquely determines the parameters of the Hamiltonian of the boson core, and only the strength of the particle-core coupling is specifically adjusted to selected data for a particular nucleus. The approach is illustrated in a systematic study of low-energy excitation spectra and transition rates of axially deformed odd-mass Eu isotopes.
  • The framework of nuclear energy density functionals is applied to a study of the formation and evolution of cluster states in nuclei. The relativistic functional DD-ME2 is used in triaxial and reflection-asymmetric relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov calculations of relatively light $N = Z$ and neutron-rich nuclei. The role of deformation and degeneracy of single-nucleon states in the formation of clusters is analysed, and interesting cluster structures are predicted in excited configurations of Be, C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar and Ca $N = Z$ nuclei. Cluster phenomena in neutron-rich nuclei are discussed, and it is shown that in neutron-rich Be and C nuclei cluster states occur as a result of molecular bonding of $\alpha$-particles by the excess neutrons, and also that proton covalent bonding can occur in $^{10}$C.
  • The DIRHB package consists of three Fortran computer codes for the calculation of the ground-state properties of even-even atomic nuclei using the framework of relativistic self-consistent mean-field models. Each code corresponds to a particular choice of spatial symmetry: the DIRHBS, DIRHBZ and DIRHBT codes are used to calculate nuclei with spherical symmetry, axially symmetric quadrupole deformation, and triaxial quadrupole shapes, respectively. Reflection symmetry is assumed in all three cases. The latest relativistic nuclear energy density functionals are implemented in the codes, thus enabling efficient and accurate calculations over the entire nuclide chart.
  • A systematic analysis of low-lying quadrupole and octupole collective states is presented, based on the microscopic energy density functional framework. By mapping the deformation constrained self-consistent axially symmetric mean-field energy surfaces onto the equivalent Hamiltonian of the $sdf$ interacting boson model (IBM), that is, onto the energy expectation value in the boson condensate state, the Hamiltonian parameters are determined. The study is based on the global relativistic energy density functional DD-PC1. The resulting IBM Hamiltonian is used to calculate excitation spectra and transition rates for the positive- and negative-parity collective states in four isotopic chains characteristic for two regions of octupole deformation and collectivity: Th, Ra, Sm and Ba. Consistent with the empirical trend, the microscopic calculation based on the systematics of $\beta_{2}$-$\beta_{3}$ energy maps, the resulting low-lying negative-parity bands and transition rates show evidence of a shape transition between stable octupole deformation and octupole vibrations characteristic for $\beta_{3}$-soft potentials.
  • The $\beta$-decay half-lives of neutron-rich nuclei with $20 \leqslant Z \leqslant 50$ are systematically investigated using the newly developed fully self-consistent proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), based on the spherical relativistic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (RHFB) framework. Available data are reproduced by including an isospin-dependent proton-neutron pairing interaction in the isoscalar channel of the RHFB+QRPA model. With the calculated $\beta$-decay half-lives of neutron-rich nuclei a remarkable speeding up of $r$-matter flow is predicted. This leads to enhanced $r$-process abundances of elements with $A \gtrsim 140$, an important result for the understanding of the origin of heavy elements in the universe.
  • Using the framework of nuclear energy density functionals we examine the conditions for single-nucleon localization and formation of cluster structures in finite nuclei. We propose to characterize localization by the ratio of the dispersion of single-nucleon wave functions to the average inter-nucleon distance. This parameter generally increases with mass and describes the gradual transition from a hybrid phase in light nuclei, characterized by the spatial localization of individual nucleon states that leads to the formation of cluster structures, toward the Fermi liquid phase in heavier nuclei. Values of the localization parameter that correspond to a crystal phase cannot occur in finite nuclei. Typical length and energy scales in nuclei allow the formation of liquid drops, clusters, and halo structures.
  • The structure of low-energy collective states in proton-deficient N=28 isotones is analyzed using structure models based on the relativistic energy density functional DD-PC1. The relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov model for triaxial nuclei is used to calculate binding energy maps in the $\beta$-$\gamma$ plane. The evolution of neutron and proton single-particle levels with quadrupole deformation, and the occurrence of gaps around the Fermi surface, provide a simple microscopic interpretation of the onset of deformation and shape coexistence. Starting from self-consistent constrained energy surfaces calculated with the functional DD-PC1, a collective Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrations and rotations is employed in the analysis of excitation spectra and transition rates of $^{46}$Ar, $^{44}$S, and $^{42}$Si. The results are compared to available data, and previous studies based either on the mean-field approach or large-scale shell-model calculations. The present study is particularly focused on $^{44}$S, for which data have recently been reported that indicate pronounced shape coexistence.
  • Starting from the adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock approximation (ATDHF), we propose an efficient method to calculate the Thouless-Valatin moments of inertia for the nuclear system. The method is based on the rapid convergence of the expansion of the inertia matrix. The accuracy of the proposed method is verified in the rotational case by comparing the results with the exact Thouless-Valatin moments of inertia calculated using the self-consistent cranking model. The proposed method is computationally much more efficient than the full ATDHF calculation, yet it retains a high accuracy of the order of 1%.
  • Relativistic energy density functionals (REDF) provide a complete and accurate, global description of nuclear structure phenomena. A modern semi-empirical functional, adjusted to the nuclear matter equation of state and to empirical masses of deformed nuclei, is applied to studies of shapes of superheavy nuclei. The theoretical framework is tested in a comparison of calculated masses, quadrupole deformations, and potential energy barriers to available data on actinide isotopes. Self-consistent mean-field calculations predict a variety of spherical, axial and triaxial shapes of long-lived superheavy nuclei, and their alpha-decay energies and half-lives are compared to data. A microscopic, REDF-based, quadrupole collective Hamiltonian model is used to study the effect of explicit treatment of collective correlations in the calculation of Q{\alpha} values and half-lives.
  • Nucleonic matter displays a quantum liquid structure, but in some cases finite nuclei behave like molecules composed of clusters of protons and neutrons. Clustering is a recurrent feature in light nuclei, from beryllium to nickel. For instance, in $^{12}$C the Hoyle state, crucial for stellar nucleosynthesis, can be described as a nuclear molecule consisting of three alpha-particles. The mechanism of cluster formation, however, has not yet been fully understood. We show that the origin of clustering can be traced back to the depth of the confining nuclear potential. By employing the theoretical framework of energy density functionals that encompasses both cluster and quantum liquid-drop aspects of nuclei, it is shown that the depth of the potential determines the energy spacings between single-nucleon orbitals, the localization of the corresponding wave functions and, therefore, the degree of nucleonic density clustering. Relativistic functionals, in particular, are characterized by deep single-nucleon potentials. When compared to non-relativistic functionals that yield similar ground-state properties (binding energy, deformation, radii), they predict the occurrence of much more pronounced cluster structures. More generally, clustering is considered as a transitional phenomenon between crystalline and quantum liquid phases of fermionic systems.
  • \gamma-softness in atomic nuclei is investigated in the framework of energy density functionals. By mapping constrained microscopic energy surfaces for a set of representative non-axial medium-heavy and heavy nuclei to a Hamiltonian of the proton-neutron interacting boson model (IBM-2) containing up to three-body interactions, low-lying collective spectra and transition rates are calculated. Observables are analyzed that distinguish between the two limiting geometrical pictures of non-axial nuclei: the rigid-triaxial rotor and the \gamma-unstable rotor. It is shown that neither of these pictures is realized in actual nuclei, and that a microscopic description leads to results that are almost exactly in between the two geometrical limits. This finding points to the optimal choice of the IBM Hamiltonian for \gamma-soft nuclei.
  • Modern applications of Covariant Density Functional Theory (CDFT) are discussed. First we show a systematic investigation of fission barriers in actinide nuclei within constraint relativistic mean field theory allowing for triaxial deformations. In the second part we discuss a microscopic theory of quantum phase transitions (QPT) based on the relativistic generator coordinate method.
  • Microscopic energy density functionals (EDF) have become a standard tool for nuclear structure calculations, providing an accurate global description of nuclear ground states and collective excitations. For spectroscopic applications this framework has to be extended to account for collective correlations related to restoration of symmetries broken by the static mean field, and for fluctuations of collective variables. In this work we compare two approaches to five-dimensional quadrupole dynamics: the collective Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrations and rotations, and the Interacting Boson Model. The two models are compared in a study of the evolution of non-axial shapes in Pt isotopes. Starting from the binding energy surfaces of $^{192,194,196}$Pt, calculated with a microscopic energy density functional, we analyze the resulting low-energy collective spectra obtained from the collective Hamiltonian, and the corresponding IBM-2 Hamiltonian. The calculated excitation spectra and transition probabilities for the ground-state bands and the $\gamma$-vibration bands are compared to the corresponding sequences of experimental states.
  • The transition density $n_t$ and pressure $P_t$ at the inner edge between the liquid core and the solid crust of a neutron star are analyzed using the thermodynamical method and the framework of relativistic nuclear energy density functionals. Starting from a functional that has been carefully adjusted to experimental binding energies of finite nuclei, and varying the density dependence of the corresponding symmetry energy within the limits determined by isovector properties of finite nuclei, we estimate the constraints on the core-crust transition density and pressure of neutron stars: $0.086 \ {\rm fm}^{-3} \leq n_t < 0.090 \ {\rm fm}^{-3}$ and $0.3\ {\rm MeV \ fm}^{-3} < P_t \leq 0.76 \ {\rm MeV \ fm}^{-3}$.
  • The rapid transition between spherical and $\gamma$-soft shapes in Ba and Xe nuclei in the mass region $A \geq 130$ is analyzed using excitation spectra and collective wave functions obtained by diagonalization of a five-dimensional Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom, with parameters determined by constrained self-consistent relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. The results reproduce the characteristic evolution of excitation spectra and E2 transition probabilities and, in general, a good agreement with available data is obtained. The calculated spectra display fingerprints of a second-order shape phase transition that can approximately be described by analytic solutions corresponding to the E(5) dynamical symmetry.
  • A recently introduced separable pairing force for relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) calculations, adjusted in nuclear matter to the pairing gap of the Gogny force, is employed in the 3D RHB model for triaxial shapes. The pairing force is separable in momentum space but, when transformed to coordinate space in calculations of finite nuclei, it is no longer separable because of translational invariance. The corresponding pairing matrix elements are represented as a sum of a finite number of separable terms in the basis of a 3D harmonic oscillator. The 3D RHB model is applied to the calculation of binding energy surfaces and pairing energy maps for a sequence of even-A Sm isotopes.
  • Microscopic signatures of nuclear ground-state shape phase transitions in Nd isotopes are studied using excitation spectra and collective wave functions obtained by diagonalization of a five-dimensional Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom, with parameters determined by constrained self-consistent relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. As a function of the physical control parameter -- the number of nucleons, energy gaps between the ground state and the excited vibrational states with zero angular momentum, isomer shifts, and monopole transition strengths, exhibit sharp discontinuities at neutron number N=90, characteristic of a first-order quantum phase transition.
  • The analysis of shape transitions in Nd isotopes, based on the framework of relativistic energy density functionals and restricted to axially symmetric shapes in Ref. \cite{PRL99}, is extended to the region $Z = 60$, 62, 64 with $N \approx 90$, and includes both $\beta$ and $\gamma$ deformations. Collective excitation spectra and transition probabilities are calculated starting from a five-dimensional Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom, with parameters determined by constrained self-consistent relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. The results reproduce available data, and show that there is an abrupt change of structure at N=90 that can be approximately characterized by the X(5) analytic solution at the critical point of the first-order quantum phase transition between spherical and axially deformed shapes.
  • The relativistic proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (PN-RQRPA) is applied in the calculation of total muon capture rates on a large set of nuclei from $^{12}$C to $^{244}$Pu, for which experimental values are available. The microscopic theoretical framework is based on the Relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model for the nuclear ground state, and transitions to excited states are calculated using the PN-RQRPA. The calculation is fully consistent, i.e., the same interactions are used both in the RHB equations that determine the quasiparticle basis, and in the matrix equations of the PN-RQRPA. The calculated capture rates are sensitive to the in-medium quenching of the axial-vector coupling constant. By reducing this constant from its free-nucleon value $g_A = 1.262$ by 10% for all multipole transitions, the calculation reproduces the experimental muon capture rates to better than 10% accuracy.