• We present the detection of four far-infrared fine-structure oxygen lines, as well as strong upper limits for the CO(2-1) and [N II] 205 um lines, in 3C 368, a well-studied radio-loud galaxy at z = 1.131. These new oxygen lines, taken in conjunction with previously observed neon and carbon fine-structure lines, suggest a powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN), accompanied by vigorous and extended star formation. A starburst dominated by O8 stars, with an age of ~6.5 Myr, provides a good fit to the fine-structure line data. This estimated age of the starburst makes it nearly concurrent with the latest episode of AGN activity, suggesting a link between the growth of the supermassive black hole and stellar population in this source. We do not detect the CO(2-1) line, down to a level twelve times lower than the expected value for star forming galaxies. This lack of CO line emission is consistent with recent star formation activity if the star-forming molecular gas has low metallicity, is highly fractionated (such that CO is photodissociated through much of the clouds), or is chemically very young (such that CO has not yet had time to form). It is also possible, though we argue unlikely, that the ensemble of fine structure lines are emitted from the region heated by the AGN.
  • We aim to understand the contribution of the ionized, atomic and molecular phases of the ISM to the [CII] emission from clouds near the dynamical center and the BCLMP302 HII region in the north of the nearby galaxy M33 at a spatial resolution of 50pc. We combine high resolution [CII] spectra taken with the HIFI spectrometer onboard the Herschel satellite with [CII] Herschel-PACS maps and ground-based observations of CO(2-1) and HI. All data are at a common spatial resolution of 50pc. Typically, the [CII] lines have widths intermediate between the narrower CO(2-1) and broader HI line profiles. We decomposed the [CII] spectra in terms of contribution from molecular and atomic gas detected in CO(2-1) and HI, respectively. We find that the relative contribution of molecular and atomic gas traced by CO(2-1) and HI varies depends mostly on the local physical conditions and geometry. We estimate that 11-60% and 5-34% of the [CII] intensities in the center and in BCLMP302, respectively, arise at velocities showing no CO(2-1) or HI emission and could arise in CO-dark molecular gas. The deduced strong variation in the [CII] emission not associated with CO and HI cannot be explained in terms of differences in A_v, far-ultraviolet radiation field, and metallicity between the two studied regions. Hence the relative amounts of diffuse (CO-dark) and dense molecular gas possibly vary on spatial scales smaller than 50pc. Based on the emission measure observed at radio wavelengths we estimate the contribution of ionized gas at a few positions to lie between 10-25%. The correlations between the intensities of tracers corresponding to the same velocity range as [CII], differ from the correlation derived from PACS data. The results in this paper emphasize the need for velocity-resolved observations to discern the contribution of different components of the ISM to [CII] emission. (abridged)
  • We report the detection of far-infrared (FIR) CO rotational emission from nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) and starburst galaxies, as well as several merging systems and Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs). Using Herschel-PACS, we have detected transitions in the J$_{upp}$ = 14 - 20 range ($\lambda \sim$ 130 - 185 $\mu$m, $\nu \sim$ 1612 - 2300 GHz) with upper limits on (and in two cases, detections of) CO line fluxes up to J$_{upp}$ = 30. The PACS CO data obtained here provide the first well-sampled FIR extragalactic CO SLEDs for this range, and will be an essential reference for future high redshift studies. We find a large range in the overall SLED shape, even amongst galaxies of similar type, demonstrating the uncertainties in relying solely on high-J CO diagnostics to characterize the excitation source of a galaxy. Combining our data with low-J line intensities taken from the literature, we present a CO ratio-ratio diagram and discuss its potential diagnostic value in distinguishing excitation sources and physical properties of the molecular gas. The position of a galaxy on such a diagram is less a signature of its excitation mechanism, than an indicator of the presence (or absence) of warm, dense molecular gas. We then quantitatively analyze the CO emission from a subset of the detected sources with Large Velocity Gradient (LVG) radiative transfer models to fit the CO SLEDs. Using both single-component and two-component LVG models to fit the kinetic temperature, velocity gradient, number density and column density of the gas, we derive the molecular gas mass and the corresponding CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor, $\alpha_{CO}$, for each respective source. For the ULIRGs we find $\alpha$ values in the canonical range 0.4 - 5 M$_\odot$/(K kms$^{-1}$pc$^2$), while for the other objects, $\alpha$ varies between 0.2 and 14.} Finally, we compare our best-fit LVG model ..
  • We present 75"x75" size maps of M82 at 6.4 micron, 6.6 micron, 7.7 micron, 31.5 micron, and 37.1 micron with a resolution of ~4" that we have obtained with the mid-IR camera FORCAST on SOFIA. We find strong emission from the inner 60" (~1kpc) along the major axis, with the main peak 5" west-southwest of the nucleus and a secondary peak 4" east-northeast of the nucleus. The detailed morphology of the emission differs among the bands, which is likely due to different dust components dominating the continuum emission at short mid-IR wavelengths and long mid-IR wavelengths. We include Spitzer-IRS and Herschel/PACS 70 micron data to fit spectral energy distribution templates at both emission peaks. The best fitting templates have extinctions of A_V = 18 and A_V = 9 toward the main and secondary emission peak and we estimated a color temperature of 68 K at both peaks from the 31 micron and 37 micron measurement. At the emission peaks the estimated dust masses are on the order of 10^{4} M_sun.
  • The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) completed its first light flight in May of 2010 using the facility mid-infrared instrument FORCAST. Since then, FORCAST has successfully completed thirteen science flights on SOFIA. In this paper we describe the design, operation and performance of FORCAST as it relates to the initial three Short Science flights. FORCAST was able to achieve near diffraction-limited images for lambda > 30 microns allowing unique science results from the start with SOFIA. We also describe ongoing and future modifications that will improve overall capabilities and performance of FORCAST.
  • We have detected the CO(6-5), CO(7-6), and [CI] 370 micron lines from the nuclear region of NGC 891 with our submillimeter grating spectrometer ZEUS on the CSO. These lines provide constraints on photodissociation region (PDR) and shock models that have been invoked to explain the H_2 S(0), S(1), and S(2) lines observed with Spitzer. We analyze our data together with the H_2 lines, CO(3-2), and IR continuum from the literature using a combined PDR/shock model. We find that the mid-J CO originates almost entirely from shock-excited warm molecular gas; contributions from PDRs are negligible. Also, almost all the H_2 S(2) and half of the S(1) line is predicted to emerge from shocks. Shocks with a pre-shock density of 2x10^4 cm^-3 and velocities of 10 km/s and 20 km/s for C-shocks and J-shocks, respectively, provide the best fit. In contrast, the [CI] line emission arises exclusively from the PDR component, which is best parameterized by a density of 3.2x10^3 cm^-3 and a FUV field of G_o = 100 for both PDR/shock-type combinations. Our mid-J CO observations show that turbulence is a very important heating source in molecular clouds, even in normal quiescent galaxies. The most likely energy sources for the shocks are supernovae or outflows from YSOs. The energetics of these shock sources favor C-shock excitation of the lines.
  • Context: The emission line of [CII] at 158 micron is one of the strongest cooling lines of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies. Aims: Disentangling the relative contributions of the different ISM phases to [CII] emission, is a major topic of the HerM33es program, a Herschel key project to study the ISM in the nearby spiral galaxy M33. Methods: Using PACS, we have mapped the emission of [CII] 158 micron, [OI] 63 micron, and other FIR lines in a 2'x2' region of the northern spiral arm of M33, centered on the HII region BCLMP302. At the peak of H-alpha emission, we have observed in addition a velocity resolved [CII] spectrum using HIFI. We use scatterplots to compare these data with PACS 160 micron continuum maps, and with maps of CO and HI data, at a common resolution of 12 arcsec or 50 pc. Maps of H-alpha and 24 micron emission observed with Spitzer are used to estimate the SFR. We have created maps of the [CII] and [OI] 63 micron emission and detected [NII] 122 micron and NIII 57 micron at individual positions. Results: The [CII] line observed with HIFI is significantly broader than that of CO, and slightly blue-shifted. In addition, there is little spatial correlation between [CII] observed with PACS and CO over the mapped region. There is even less spatial correlation between [CII] and the atomic gas traced by HI. Detailed comparison of the observed intensities towards the HII region with models of photo ionization and photon dominated regions, confirms that a significant fraction, 20--30%, of the observed [CII] emission stems from the ionized gas and not from the molecular cloud. The gas heating efficiency, using the ratio between [CII] and the TIR as a proxy, varies between 0.07 and 1.5%, with the largest variations found outside the HII region.
  • We have detected the 158 {\mu}m [CII] line from 12 galaxies at z~1-2. This is the first survey of this important starformation tracer at redshifts covering the epoch of maximum star-formation in the Universe and quadruples the number of reported high z [CII] detections. The line is very luminous, between <0.024-0.65% of the far-infrared continuum luminosity of our sources, and arises from PDRs on molecular cloud surfaces. An exception is PKS 0215+015, where half of the [CII] emission could arise from XDRs near the central AGN. The L[CII] /LFIR ratio in our star-formation-dominated systems is ~8 times larger than that of our AGN-dominated systems. Therefore this ratio selects for star-formation-dominated systems. Furthermore, the L[CII]/LFIR and L[CII]/L(CO(1-0)) ratios in our starforming galaxies and nearby starburst galaxies are the same, so that luminous starforming galaxies at earlier epochs (z~1-2) appear to be scaled up versions of local starbursts entailing kilo-parsec-scale starbursts. Most of the FIR and [CII] radiation from our AGN-dominated sample (excepting PKS 0215+015) also arises from kpc scale starformation, but with far-UV radiation fields ~8 times more intense than in our star-formation-dominated sample. We speculate that the onset of AGN activity stimulates large-scale star-formation activity within AGN-dominated systems. This idea is supported by the relatively strong [OIII] line emission, indicating very young stars, that was recently observed in high z composite AGN/starburst systems. Our results confirm the utility of the [CII] line, and in particular, the L[CII]/L(FIR) and L[CII]/LCO(1-0) ratios as a tracers of star-formation in galaxies at high redshifts.
  • We have made the first detections of the 88 micron [OIII] line from galaxies in the early Universe, detecting the line from the lensed AGN/starburst composite systems APM 08279+5255 at z = 3.911 and SMM J02399-0136 at z = 2.8076. The line is exceptionally bright from both systems, with apparent (lensed) luminosities ~10^11 L_solar. For APM 08279, the [OIII] line flux can be modeled in a star formation paradigm, with the stellar radiation field dominated by stars with effective temperatures, Teff >36,000 K, similar to the starburst found in M82. The model implies ~35% of the total far-IR luminosity of the system is generated by the starburst, with the remainder arising from dust heated by the AGN. The 88 micron line can also be generated in the narrow line region of the AGN if gas densities are around a few 1000 cm-3. For SMM J02399 the [OIII] line likely arises from HII regions formed by hot (Teff >40,000 K) young stars in a massive starburst that dominates the far-IR luminosity of the system. The present work demonstrates the utility of the [OIII] line for characterizing starbursts and AGN within galaxies in the early Universe. These are the first detections of this astrophysically important line from galaxies beyond a redshift of 0.05.
  • We report the detection of 158 micron [CII] fine-structure line emission from MIPS J142824.0+352619, a hyperluminous (L_IR ~ 10^13 L_sun) starburst galaxy at z=1.3. The line is bright, and corresponds to a fraction L_[CII]/L_FIR = 2 x 10^-3 of the far-IR (FIR) continuum. The [CII], CO, and FIR continuum emission may be modeled as arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs) that have a characteristic gas density of n ~ 10^4.2 cm^-3, and that are illuminated by a far-UV radiation field ~10^3.2 times more intense than the local interstellar radiation field. The mass in these PDRs accounts for approximately half of the molecular gas mass in this galaxy. The L_[CII]/L_FIR ratio is higher than observed in local ULIRGs or in the few high-redshift QSOs detected in [CII], but the L_[CII]/L_FIR and L_CO/L_FIR ratios are similar to the values seen in nearby starburst galaxies. This suggests that MIPS J142824.0+352619 is a scaled-up version of a starburst nucleus, with the burst extended over several kiloparsecs.
  • We report the detection of 13CO(J=6-5) emission from the nucleus of the starburst galaxy NGC 253 with the redshift (z) and Early Universe Spectrometer (ZEUS), a new submillimeter grating spectrometer. This is the first extragalactic detection of the 13CO(J=6-5) transition, which traces warm, dense molecular gas. We employ a multi-line LVG analysis and find ~ 35% - 60% of the molecular ISM is both warm (T ~ 110 K) and dense (n(H2) ~ 10^4 cm^-3). We analyze the potential heat sources, and conclude that UV and X-ray photons are unlikely to be energetically important. Instead, the molecular gas is most likely heated by an elevated density of cosmic rays or by the decay of supersonic turbulence through shocks. If the cosmic rays and turbulence are created by stellar feedback within the starburst, then our analysis suggests the starburst may be self-limiting.
  • We report the first detection of the 205 um 3P1 - 3P0 [NII] line from a ground-based observatory using a direct detection spectrometer. The line was detected from the Carina star formation region using the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) on the Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) at South Pole. The [NII] 205 um line strength indicates a low-density (n ~ 32 cm^-3 ionized medium, similar to the low-density ionized halo reported previously in its [OIII] 52 and 88 um line emission. When compared with the ISO [CII] observations of this region, we find that ~27% of the [CII] line emission arises from this low-density ionized gas, but the large majority ~ 73% of the observed [CII] line emission arises from the neutral interstellar medium. This result supports and underpins prior conclusions that most of the observed [CII] 158 um line emission from Galactic and extragalactic sources arises from the warm, dense photodissociated surfaces of molecular clouds. The detection of the [NII] line demonstrates the utility of Antarctic sites for THz spectroscopy.
  • We report observations of the CO J=7->6 transition toward the starburst nucleus of NGC 253. This is the highest-excitation CO measurement in this source to date, and allows an estimate of the molecular gas excitation conditions. Comparison of the CO line intensities with a large velocity gradient, escape probability model indicates that the bulk of the 2-5 x 10^7 solar masses of molecular gas in the central 180 pc is highly excited. A model with T ~ 120 K, n_H_2 ~ 4.5 x 10^4 cm^-3 is consistent with the observed CO intensities as well as the rotational H2 lines observed with ISO. The inferred mass of warm, dense molecular gas is 10--30 times the atomic gas mass as traced through its [CII] and [OI] line emission. This large mass ratio is inconsistent with photodissociation region models where the gas is heated by far-UV starlight. It is also not likely that the gas is heated by shocks in outflows or cloud-cloud collisions. We conclude that the best mechanism for heating the gas is cosmic rays, which provide a natural means of uniformly heating the full volume of molecular clouds. With the tremendous supernova rate in the nucleus of NGC 253, the CR heating rate is at least ~800 times greater than in the Galaxy, more than sufficient to match the cooling observed in the CO lines.
  • The South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) is the first instrument of its kind -- a direct-detection imaging spectrometer for astronomy in the submillimeter band. SPIFI's focal plane is a square array of 25 silicon bolometers cooled to 60 mK; the spectrometer consists of two cryogenic, scanning Fabry-Perot interferometers in series with a 60 mK bandpass filter. The instrument operates in the short submillimeter windows (350 microns, 450 microns) available from the ground, with spectral resolving power selectable between 500 and 10000. At present, SPIFI's sensitivity is within a factor 1.5-3 of the photon background limit, comparable to the best heterodyne spectrometers. The instrument's large bandwidth and mapping capability provide substantial advantages for specific astrophysical projects, including deep extragalactic observations. In this article we present the motivation for and design of SPIFI and its operational characteristics on the telescope.
  • We have mapped the inner 360'' regions of M51 in the 158micron [CII] line at 55'' spatial resolution using the Far-infrared Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FIFI) on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The emission is peaked at the nucleus, but is detectable over the entire region mapped, which covers much of the optical disk of the galaxy. There are also two strong secondary peaks at ~43% to 70% of the nuclear value located roughly 120'' to the north-east, and south-west of the nucleus. These secondary peaks are at the same distance from the nucleus as the corotation radius of the density wave pattern. The density wave also terminates at this location, and the outlying spiral structure is attributed to material clumping due to the interaction between M51 and NGC5195. This orbit crowding results in cloud-cloud collisions, stimulating star formation, that we see as enhanced [CII] line emission. The [CII] emission at the peaks originates mainly from photodissociation regions (PDRs) formed on the surfaces of molecular clouds that are exposed to OB starlight, so that these [CII] peaks trace star formation peaks in M51. The total mass of [CII] emitting photodissociated gas is ~2.6x10^{8} M_{sun}, or about 2% of the molecular gas as estimated from its CO(1-0) line emission. At the peak [CII] positions, the PDR gas mass to total gas mass fraction is somewhat higher, 3-17%, and at the secondary peaks the mass fraction of the [CII] emitting photodissociated gas can be as high as 72% of the molecular mass.... (continued)
  • We present observations of NGC 4038/39 in the [CII] 158 micron fine structure line taken with the MPE/UCB Far-infrared Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FIFI) on the KAO with 55" resolution. The total [CII] luminosity of the Antennae is 3.7x10^8 L(sun), which is about 1% of the FIR luminosity. The main part of the [CII] emission probably arises from photodissociation regions (PDRs). Up to 1/3 of the observed [CII] emission may originate from the CNM for higher temperatures and densities. From PDR models we derive densities and FUV intensities for the nuclei and the interaction zone. The minimum masses in the [CII] emitting regions in the interaction zone and the nuclei are a few x 10^(7) M(sun). We find that the [CII] to CO intensity ratio at the interaction zone is a factor of 2.6 lower than usually observed in starburst galaxies, but still a factor of about 1.3 to 1.4 higher than at the nuclei of NGC 4038/39, indicating no global starburst is taking place in the Antennae. [CII] emission arising partly from confined starburst regions and partly from surrounding quiescent clouds could explain the observed [CII] radiation at the interaction zone and the nuclei. There are small confined regions with high star formation activity in the interaction zone and with a lower star formation activity in the nuclei. This supports the high density and high FUV intensity for the PDRs in the interaction zone and the nuclei.