• The polarization characteristics of zebra patterns (ZPs) in type IV solar bursts were studied. We analyzed 21 ZP events observed by the Assembly of Metric-band Aperture Telescope and Real-time Analysis System between 2010 and 2015 and identified the following characteristics: a degree of circular polarization (DCP) in the range of 0%-70%, a temporal delay of 0-70 ms between the two circularly polarized components (i.e., the right- and left-handed components), and dominant ordinary-mode emission in about 81% of the events. For most events, the relation between the dominant and delayed components could be interpreted in the framework of fundamental plasma emission and depolarization during propagation, though the values of DCP and delay were distributed across wide ranges. Furthermore, it was found that the DCP and delay were positively correlated (rank correlation coefficient R = 0.62). As a possible interpretation of this relationship, we considered a model based on depolarization due to reflections at sharp density boundaries assuming fundamental plasma emission. The model calculations of depolarization including multiple reflections and group delay during propagation in the inhomogeneous corona showed that the DCP and delay decreased as the number of reflections increased, which is consistent with the observational results. The dispersive polarization characteristics could be explained by the different numbers of reflections causing depolarization.
  • An M6.5-class flare was observed at N12E56 of the solar surface at 16:06 UT on July 8, 2014. In association with this flare, solar neutron detectors located on two high mountains, Mt. Sierra Negra and Chacaltaya and at the space station observed enhancements in the neutral channel. The authors analysed these data and a possible scenario of enhancements produced by high-energy protons and neutrons is proposed, using the data from continuous observation of a solar surface by the ultraviolet telescope onboard the Solar Dynamical Observatory (SDO).
  • The solar neutron detector SEDA-FIB onboard the International Space Station (ISS) has detected several events from the solar direction associated with three large solar flares observed on March 5th (X1.1), 7th (X5.4), and 9th (M6.3) of 2012. In this study, we present the time profiles of those neutrons and discuss the physics that may be related to a possible acceleration scenario for ions over the solar surface. We compare our data with the dynamical pictures of the flares obtained by the ultra-violet telescope of the space-based Solar Dynamics Observatory.
  • A new type of solar neutron detector (SEDA-FIB) was launched on board the Space Shuttle Endeavor on July 16 2009, and began collecting data at the International Space Station (ISS) on August 25 2009. This paper summarizes four years of observations with the solar neutron detector SEDA-FIB (Space Environment Data Acquisition using the FIBer detector). The solar neutron detector FIB can determine both the energy and arrival direction of solar neutrons. In this paper, we first present the angular distribution of neutron induced protons obtained in Monte Carlo simulations. The results are compared with the experimental results. Then we provide the angular distribution of background neutrons during one full orbit of the ISS (90 minutes). Next, the angular distribution of neutrons during the flare onset time from 20:02 to 20:10 UT on March 7 2011 is presented. It is compared with the distribution when a solar flare is not occurring. Observed solar neutrons possibly originated from the M-class solar flares that occurred on March 7 (M3.7), June 7 (M2.5), September 24 (M3.0) (weak signal) and November 3 (X1.9) of 2011 and January 23 of 2012 (M8.7). This marked the first time that neutrons have been observed from M-class solar flares. A possible interpretation of the neutron production process will be also provided.
  • A new type of solar neutron detector (FIB) was launched onboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on July 16, 2009, and it began collecting data at the International Space Station (ISS) on August 25, 2009. This paper summarizes the three years of observations obtained by the solar neutron detector FIB until the end of July 2012. The solar neutron detector FIB can determine both the energy and arrival direction of neutrons. We measured the energy spectra of background neutrons over the SAA region and elsewhere, and found the typical trigger rates to be 20 counts/sec and 0.22 counts/sec, respectively. It is possible to identify solar neutrons to within a level of 0.028 counts/sec, provided that directional information is applied. Solar neutrons were observed in association with the M-class solar flares that occurred on March 7 (M3.7) and June 7 (M2.5) of 2011. This marked the first time that neutrons were observed in M-class solar flares. A possible interpretaion of the prodcution process is provided.
  • A solar neutron detector has been launched on the Japan Exposure Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS) in August 4, 2009. The detector works satsifactory. The detector comprises scintillation fiber and is designated as the Space Environment Data Acquisition (SEDA)-FIB. It tracks the recoil protons induced by neutrons and measurement of the proton energy using the range method. The energy resolution of the detector was measured using the proton beam at Riken. Herein, we report the energy resolution of the FIB detector by two different methods.