• We present an interferometric pump-probe technique for the characterization of attosecond electron wave packets (WPs) that uses a free WP as a reference to measure a bound WP. We demonstrate our method by exciting helium atoms using an attosecond pulse with a bandwidth centered near the ionization threshold, thus creating both a bound and a free WP simultaneously. After a variable delay, the bound WP is ionized by a few-cycle infrared laser precisely synchronized to the original attosecond pulse. By measuring the delay-dependent photoelectron spectrum we obtain an interferogram that contains both quantum beats as well as multi-path interference. Analysis of the interferogram allows us to determine the bound WP components with a spectral resolution much better than the inverse of the attosecond pulse duration.
  • Attosecond pulses can be used to initiate and control electron dynamics on a sub-femtosecond time scale. The first step in this process occurs when an atom absorbs an ultraviolet photon leading to the formation of an attosecond electron wave packet (EWP). Until now, attosecond pulses have been used to create free EWPs in the continuum, where they quickly disperse. In this paper we use a train of attosecond pulses, synchronized to an infrared (IR) laser field, to create a series of EWPs that are below the ionization threshold in helium. We show that the ionization probability then becomes a function of the delay between the IR and attosecond fields. Calculations that reproduce the experimental results demonstrate that this ionization control results from interference between transiently bound EWPs created by different pulses in the train. In this way, we are able to observe, for the first time, wave packet interference in a strongly driven atomic system.