• We present a Bayesian method to constrain the masses and radii of neutron stars (NSs) using the information encoded in the X-ray pulse profiles of accreting millisecond pulsars. We model the shape of the pulses using "oblate Schwarzschild" approximation, which takes into account the deformed shape of the star together with the special and general relativistic corrections to the photon trajectories and angles. The spectrum of the radiation is obtained from an empirical model of Comptonization in a hot slab in which a fraction of seed blackbody photons is scattered into a power-law component. By using an affine-invariant Markov chain Monte Carlo ensemble sampling method, we obtain posterior probability distributions for the different model parameters, especially for the mass and the radius. To test the robustness of our method, we first analyzed self-generated synthetic data with known model parameters. Similar analysis was then applied for the observations of SAX J1808.4-3658 by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The results show that our method can reproduce the model parameters of the synthetic data, and that accurate constraints for the radius can be obtained using the RXTE pulse profile observations if the mass is a priori known. For a mass in the range between 1.5 and 1.8 Msun, the radius of the NS in SAX J1808.4-3658 is constrained between 9 and 13 km. If the mass is accurately known, the radius can be determined with an accuracy of 5% (68% credibility). For example, for the mass of 1.7 Msun the equatorial radius is Req = 11.9+0.5 -0.4 km. Finally, we show that further improvements can be obtained when the X-ray polarization data from the Imaging X-ray Polarimeter Explorer are available.
  • The long ${\it Swift}$ gamma-ray burst GRB 120326A at redshift $z=1.798$ exhibited a multi-band light curve with a striking feature: a late-time, long-lasting achromatic rebrightening, rarely seen in such events. Peaking in optical and X-ray bands $\sim 35$ ks ($\sim 12.5$ ks in the GRB rest frame) after the 70-s GRB prompt burst, the feature brightens nearly two orders of magnitude above the underlying optical power-law decay. Modelling the multiwavelength light curves, we investigate possible causes of the rebrightening in the context of the standard fireball model. We exclude a range of scenarios for the origin of this feature: reverse-shock flash, late-time forward shock peak due to the passage of the maximal synchrotron frequency through the optical band, late central engine optical/X-ray flares, interaction between the expanding blast wave and a density enhancement in the circumburst medium and gravitational microlensing. Instead we conclude that the achromatic rebrightening may be caused by a refreshed forward shock or a geometrical effect. In addition, we identify an additional component after the end of the prompt emission, that shapes the observed X-ray and optical light curves differently, ruling out a single overall emission component to explain the observed early time emission.
  • We use a recently developed quench protection heater modeling tool for an analysis of heater delays in superconducting high-field Nb3Sn accelerator magnets. The results suggest that the calculated delays are consistent with experimental data, and show how the heater delay depends on the main heater design parameters.
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long duration (T90 ~ 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z= 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb and BOOTES telescopes when the GRB was still radiating in the gamma-ray band. Nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray to gamma-ray, which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution across 6 orders of magnitude in energy during the prompt emission phase. By fitting the time resolved prompt spectra, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard GRB synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Although the prompt optical emission is brighter than the extrapolation of the best fit X/gamma-ray spectra, it traces the gamma-ray light curve shape, suggesting a relation to the prompt high energy emission. The synchrotron + SSC scenario is disfavored by the data, but the models invoking a pair of internal shocks or having two emission regions can interpret the data well. Shortly after prompt emission (~ 1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise (alpha ~ 5.5) was observed which we interpret as the emission from the reverse shock. It is the first time that the rising phase of a reverse shock component has been closely observed. The full optical and X-ray afterglow lightcurves can be interpreted within the standard reverse shock (RS) + forward shock (FS) model. In general, the high quality prompt emission and afterglow data allow us to apply the standard fireball shock model to extract valuable information about the GRB including the radiation mechanism, radius of prompt emission R, initial Lorentz factor of the outflow, the composition of the ejecta, as well as the collimation angle and the total energy budget.