• The Kitaev quantum spin liquid displays the fractionalization of quantum spins into Majorana fermions. The emergent Majorana edge current is predicted to manifest itself in the form of a finite thermal Hall effect, a feature commonly discussed in topological superconductors. Here we report on thermal Hall conductivity $\kappa_{xy}$ measurements in $\alpha$-RuCl$_3$, a candidate Kitaev magnet with the two-dimensional honeycomb lattice. In a spin-liquid (Kitaev paramagnetic) state below the temperature characterized by the Kitaev interaction $J_K/k_B \sim 80$ K, positive $\kappa_{xy}$ develops gradually upon cooling, demonstrating the presence of highly unusual itinerant excitations. Although the zero-temperature property is masked by the magnetic ordering at $T_N=7$ K, the sign, magnitude, and $T$-dependence of $\kappa_{xy}/T$ at intermediate temperatures follows the predicted trend of the itinerant Majorana excitations.
  • The pseudogap phenomenon in cuprates is the most mysterious puzzle in the research of high-temperature superconductivity. In particular, whether the pseudogap is associated with a crossover or phase transition has been a long-standing controversial issue. The tetragonal cuprate HgBa$_2$CuO$_{4+\delta}$, with only one CuO$_2$ layer per primitive cell, is an ideal system to tackle this puzzle. Here, we measure the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility within the CuO$_2$ plane with exceptionally high-precision magnetic torque experiments. Our key finding is that a distinct two-fold in-plane anisotropy sets in below the pseudogap temperature $T^*$, which provides thermodynamic evidence for a nematic phase transition with broken four-fold symmetry. Most surprisingly, the nematic director orients along the diagonal direction of the CuO$_2$ square lattice, in sharp contrast to the bond nematicity reported in various iron-based superconductors and double-layer YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{6+\delta}$, where the anisotropy axis is along the Fe-Fe and Cu-O-Cu directions, respectively. Another remarkable feature is that the enhancement of the diagonal nematicity with decreasing temperature is suppressed around the temperature at which short-range charge-density-wave (CDW) formation occurs. This is in stark contrast to YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{6+\delta}$, where the bond nematicity is not influenced by the CDW. Our result suggests a competing relationship between diagonal nematic and CDW order in HgBa$_2$CuO$_{4+\delta}$.
  • Quantum spin liquid (QSL) is an exotic quantum phase of matter whose ground state is quantum-mechanically entangled without any magnetic ordering. A central issue concerns emergent excitations that characterize QSLs, which are hypothetically associated with quasiparticle fractionalization and topological order. Here we report highly unusual heat conduction generated by the spin degrees of freedom in a QSL state of the pyrochlore magnet Pr$_2$Zr$_2$O$_7$, which hosts spin-ice correlations with strong quantum fluctuations. The thermal conductivity in high temperature regime exhibits a two-gap behavior, which is consistent with the gapped excitations of magnetic ($M$-) and electric monopoles ($E$-particles). At very low temperatures below 200\,mK, the thermal conductivity unexpectedly shows a dramatic enhancement, which well exceeds purely phononic conductivity, demonstrating the presence of highly mobile spin excitations. This new type of excitations can be attributed to emergent photons ($\nu$-particle), coherent gapless spin excitations in a spin-ice manifold.
  • Unconventional superconductivity and magnetism are intertwined on a microscopic level in a wide class of materials. A new approach to this most fundamental and hotly debated issue focuses on the role of interactions between superconducting electrons and bosonic fluctuations at the interface between adjacent layers in heterostructures. Here we fabricate hybrid superlattices consisting of alternating atomic layers of heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn$_5$ and antiferromagnetic (AFM) metal CeRhIn$_5$, in which the AFM order can be suppressed by applying pressure. We find that the superconducting and AFM states coexist in spatially separated layers, but their mutual coupling via the interface significantly modifies the superconducting properties. An analysis of upper critical fields reveals that near the critical pressure where AFM order vanishes, the force binding superconducting electron-pairs acquires an extremely strong-coupling nature. This demonstrates that superconducting pairing can be tuned non-trivially by magnetic fluctuations (paramagnons) injected through the interface, leading to maximization of the pairing interaction.
  • Unconventional superconductivity often competes or coexists with other electronic orders. In iron-based superconductors, relationship between superconductivity and the nematic state, where the lattice rotational symmetry is spontaneously broken in the electronic states, has been discussed but unclear. Using spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy, we investigate how the band structure and the superconducting gap evolve in FeSe$_{1-x}$S$_x$, as the sulfur substitution suppresses nematicity that eventually diminishes at the nematic end point (NEP) at $x=0.17$. Anisotropic quasiparticle-interference patterns, which represent the nematic band structure, gradually become isotropic with increasing $x$ without detectable anomalies in the band parameters at the NEP. By contrast, the superconducting gap, which is almost intact in the nematic phase, suddenly shrinks as soon as $x$ exceeds the NEP. Our observation implies that the presence or absence of nematicity results in two distinct pairing states, whereas the pairing interaction is insensitive to the strength of nematicity. This provides a clue for understanding the pairing mechanism.
  • A fundamental issue concerning iron-based superconductivity is the roles of electronic nematicity and magnetism in realising high transition temperature ($T_{\rm c}$). To address this issue, FeSe is a key material, as it exhibits a unique pressure phase diagram involving nonmagnetic nematic and pressure-induced antiferromagnetic ordered phases. However, as these two phases in FeSe overlap with each other, the effects of two orders on superconductivity remain perplexing. Here we construct the three-dimensional electronic phase diagram, temperature ($T$) against pressure ($P$) and isovalent S-substitution ($x$), for FeSe$_{1-x}$S$_{x}$, in which we achieve a complete separation of nematic and antiferromagnetic phases. In between, an extended nonmagnetic tetragonal phase emerges, where we find a striking enhancement of $T_{\rm c}$. The completed phase diagram uncovers two superconducting domes with similarly high $T_{\rm c}$ on both ends of the dome-shaped antiferromagnetic phase. The $T_{\rm c}(P,x)$ variation implies that nematic fluctuations unless accompanying magnetism are not relevant for high-$T_{\rm c}$ superconductivity in this system.
  • A key aspect of unconventional pairing by the antiferromagnetic spin-fluctuation mechanism is that the superconducting energy gap must have opposite sign on different parts of the Fermi surface. Recent observations of non-nodal gap structure in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCu$_2$Si$_2$ were then very surprising, given that this material has long been considered a prototypical example of a superconductor where the Cooper pairing is magnetically mediated. Here we present a study of the effect of controlled point defects, introduced by electron irradiation, on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth $\lambda(T)$ in CeCu$_2$Si$_2$. We find that the fully-gapped state is robust against disorder, demonstrating that low-energy bound states, expected for sign-changing gap structures, are not induced by nonmagnetic impurities. This provides bulk evidence for $s_{++}$-wave superconductivity without sign reversal.
  • The superconducting transition of FeSe$_{1-x}$S$_x$ with three distinct sulphur concentrations $x$ was studied under hydrostatic pressure up to $\sim$70 kbar via bulk AC susceptibility. The pressure dependence of the superconducting transition temperature ($T_c$) features a small dome-shaped variation at low pressures for $x=0.04$ and $x=0.12$, followed by a more substantial $T_c$ enhancement to a value of around 30 K at moderate pressures. In $x=0.21$, a similar overall pressure dependence of $T_c$ is observed, except that the small dome at low pressures is flattened. For all three concentrations, a significant weakening of the diamagnetic shielding is observed beyond the pressure around which the maximum $T_c$ of 30 K is reached near the verge of pressure-induced magnetic phase. This observation points to a strong competition between the magnetic and high-$T_c$ superconducting states at high pressure in this system.
  • A central issue in the quest to understand the superconductivity in cuprates is the nature and origin of the pseudogap state, which harbours anomalous electronic states such as Fermi arc, charge density wave (CDW), and $d$-wave superconductivity. A fundamentally important, but long-standing controversial problem has been whether the pseudogap state is a distinct thermodynamic phase characterized by broken symmetries below the onset temperature $T^*$. Electronic nematicity, a fourfold ($C_4$) rotational symmetry breaking, has emerged as a key feature inside the pseudogap regime, but the presence or absence of a nematic phase transition and its relationship to the pseudogap remain unresolved. Here we report thermodynamic measurements of magnetic torque in the underdoped regime of orthorhombic YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_y$ with a field rotating in the CuO$_2$ plane, which allow us to quantify magnetic anisotropy with exceptionally high precision. Upon entering the pseudogap regime, the in-plane anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility increases after exhibiting a distinct kink at $T^*$. Our doping dependence analysis reveals that this anisotropy is preserved below $T^*$ even in the limit where the effect of orthorhombicity is eliminated. In addition, the excess in-plane anisotropy data show a remarkable scaling behaviour with respect to $T/T^*$ in a wide doping range. These results provide thermodynamic evidence that the pseudogap onset is associated with a second-order nematic phase transition, which is distinct from the CDW transition that accompanies translational symmetry breaking. This suggests that nematic fluctuations near the pseudogap phase boundary have a potential link to the strange metallic behaviour in the normal state, out of which high-$T_c$ superconductivity emerges.
  • FeSe has a unique ground state in which superconductivity coexists with a nematic order without long-range magnetic ordering at ambient pressure. Here, to study how the pairing interaction evolves with nematicity, we measured the thermal conductivity and specific heat of FeSe$_{1-x}$S$_x$, where the nematicity is suppressed by isoelectronic sulfur substitution. We find that in the whole nematic ($0\leq x \leq 0.17$) and tetragonal ($x=0.20$) regimes, the application of small magnetic field causes a steep increase of both quantities. This indicates the existence of deep minima or line nodes in the superconducting gap function, implying that the pairing interaction is significantly anisotropic in both the nematic and the tetragonal regimes. Moreover, the present results indicate that the position of gap minima/nodes in the tetragonal regime appears to be essentially different from that in the nematic regime. These results place an important constraint on current theories.
  • In exotic superconductors including high-$T_c$ copper-oxides, the interactions mediating electron Cooper-pairing are widely considered to have a magnetic rather than the conventional electron-phonon origin. Interest in such exotic pairing was initiated by the 1979 discovery of heavy-fermion superconductivity in CeCu$_2$Si$_2$, which exhibits strong antiferromagnetic fluctuations. A hallmark of unconventional pairing by anisotropic repulsive interactions is that the superconducting energy gap changes sign as a function of the electron momentum, often leading to nodes where the gap goes to zero. Here, we report low-temperature specific heat, thermal conductivity and magnetic penetration depth measurements in CeCu$_2$Si$_2$, demonstrating the absence of gap nodes at any point on the Fermi surface. Moreover, electron-irradiation experiments reveal that the superconductivity survives even when the electron mean free path becomes substantially shorter than the superconducting coherence length. This indicates that superconductivity is robust against impurities, implying that there is no sign change in the gap function. These results show that, contrary to long-standing belief, heavy electrons with extremely strong Coulomb repulsions can condense into a fully-gapped s-wave superconducting state, which has an on-site attractive pairing interaction.
  • The physics of the crossover between weak-coupling Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and strong-coupling Bose-Einstein-condensate (BEC) limits gives a unified framework of quantum bound (superfluid) states of interacting fermions. This crossover has been studied in the ultracold atomic systems, but is extremely difficult to be realized for electrons in solids. Recently, the superconducting semimetal FeSe with a transition temperature $T_{\rm c}=8.5$ K has been found to be deep inside the BCS-BEC crossover regime. Here we report experimental signatures of preformed Cooper pairing in FeSe below $T^*\sim20$ K, whose energy scale is comparable to the Fermi energies. In stark contrast to usual superconductors, large nonlinear diamagnetism by far exceeding the standard Gaussian superconducting fluctuations is observed below $T^*\sim20$ K, providing thermodynamic evidence for prevailing phase fluctuations of superconductivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transport data give evidence of pseudogap formation at $\sim T^*$. The multiband superconductivity along with electron-hole compensation in FeSe may highlight a novel aspect of the BCS-BEC crossover physics.
  • The importance of electron-hole interband interactions is widely acknowledged for iron-pnictide superconductors with high transition temperatures (Tc). However, high-Tc superconductivity without hole carriers has been suggested in FeSe single-layer films and intercalated iron-selenides, raising a fundamental question whether iron pnictides and chalcogenides have different pairing mechanisms. Here, we study the properties of electronic structure in the high-Tc phase induced by pressure in bulk FeSe from magneto-transport measurements and first-principles calculations. With increasing pressure, the low-Tc superconducting phase transforms into high-Tc phase, where we find the normal-state Hall resistivity changes sign from negative to positive, demonstrating dominant hole carriers in striking contrast to other FeSe-derived high-Tc systems. Moreover, the Hall coefficient is remarkably enlarged and the magnetoresistance exhibits anomalous scaling behaviors, evidencing strongly enhanced interband spin fluctuations in the high-Tc phase. These results in FeSe highlight similarities with high-Tc phases of iron pnictides, constituting a step toward a unified understanding of iron-based superconductivity.
  • We investigate the evolution of the Fermi surfaces and electronic interactions across the nematic phase transition in single crystals of FeSe1-xSx using Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in high magnetic fields up to 45 tesla in the low temperature regime. The unusually small and strongly elongated Fermi surface of FeSe increases monotonically with chemical pressure, x, due to the suppression of the in-plane anisotropy except for the smallest orbit which suffers a Lifshitz-like transition once nematicity disappears. Even outside the nematic phase the Fermi surface continues to increase, in stark contrast to the reconstructed Fermi surface detected in FeSe under applied external pressure. We detect signatures of orbital-dependent quasiparticle mass renomalization suppressed for those orbits with dominant dxz=yz character, but unusually enhanced for those orbits with dominant dxy character. The lack of enhanced superconductivity outside the nematic phase in FeSe1-xSx suggest that nematicity may not play the essential role in enhancing Tc in these systems.
  • Mechanism of unconventional superconductivity in FeSe has been intensely scrutinized recently because of a variety of exotic properties unprecedented for other iron-based superconductors. A central unanswered question concerns the origin of the interaction that causes the nematic transition at $T_s=90\,K$ without accompanying magnetic order. Elucidating the nature of spin excitations in the normal state is a key to addressing this issue. Here we report, from inelastic neutron-scattering measurements in FeSe single crystals, that high-energy spin excitation spectra of FeSe exhibit characteristic energy dependence with missing intensity at around 70-80$\,$meV, which are very different from other iron-based superconductors. Despite of the strongest electron correlations among the iron-based superconductor family, the spectra are qualitatively at variance with the local moment model and can be essentially described by the itinerant electron picture. Moreover, the dynamical spin susceptibility above $T_s$ is only weakly temperature dependent, which is in stark contrast to the Curie-Weiss behavior of the electronic nematic susceptibility, suggesting that the nematic transition is not likely driven by spin but by orbital degrees of freedom.
  • We report magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements on underdoped $BaFe_2(As_{1-x}P_x)_2$ ($x=0.26$) that show enhanced superconductivity along stripes parallel to twin boundaries. These stripes of enhanced diamagnetic response repel vortices when we cool in a finite magnetic field and act as barriers when we drag vortices with the magnetic MFM tip. The stripes disappear when we warm the sample towards the superconducting transition temperature. We show that stripes can move when we warm the sample and comment on the relationship between the stripes and similar stripes observed previously in $Ba(Fe_{1-x}Co_x)_2As_2$.
  • The effects of reduced dimensions and the interfaces on antiferromagnetic quantum criticality are studied in epitaxial Kondo superlattices, with alternating $n$ layers of heavy-fermion antiferromagnet CeRhIn$_5$ and 7 layers of normal metal YbRhIn$_5$. As $n$ is reduced, the Kondo coherence temperature is suppressed due to the reduction of effective Kondo screening. The N\'{e}el temperature is gradually suppressed as $n$ decreases and the quasiparticle mass is strongly enhanced, implying dimensional control toward quantum criticality. Magnetotransport measurements reveal that a quantum critical point is reached for $n=3$ superlattice by applying small magnetic fields. Remarkably, the anisotropy of the quantum critical field is opposite to the expectations from the magnetic susceptibility in bulk CeRhIn$_5$, suggesting that the Rashba spin-orbit interaction arising from the inversion symmetry breaking at the interface plays a key role for tuning the quantum criticality in the two-dimensional Kondo lattice.
  • The importance of antiferromagnetic fluctuations are widely acknowledged in most unconventional superconductors. In addition, cuprates and iron pnictides often exhibit unidirectional (nematic) electronic correlations, including stripe and orbital orders, whose fluctuations may also play a key role for electron pairing. However, these nematic correlations are intertwined with antiferromagnetic or charge orders, preventing us to identify the essential role of nematic fluctuations. This calls for new materials having only nematicity without competing or coexisting orders. Here we report systematic elastoresistance measurements in FeSe$_{1-x}$S$_{x}$ superconductors, which, unlike other iron-based families, exhibit an electronic nematic order without accompanying antiferromagnetic order. We find that the nematic transition temperature decreases with sulphur content $x$, whereas the nematic fluctuations are strongly enhanced. Near $x\approx0.17$, the nematic susceptibility diverges towards absolute zero, revealing a nematic quantum critical point. This highlights FeSe$_{1-x}$S$_{x}$ as a unique nonmagnetic system suitable for studying the impact of nematicity on superconductivity.
  • The coexistence and competition between superconductivity and electronic orders, such as spin or charge density waves, have been a central issue in high transition-temperature (${T_{\rm c}}$) superconductors. Unlike other iron-based superconductors, FeSe exhibits nematic ordering without magnetism whose relationship with its superconductivity remains unclear. More importantly, a pressure-induced fourfold increase of ${T_{\rm c}}$ has been reported, which poses a profound mystery. Here we report high-pressure magnetotransport measurements in FeSe up to $\sim9$ GPa, which uncover a hidden magnetic dome superseding the nematic order. Above ${\sim6}$ GPa the sudden enhancement of superconductivity (${T_{\rm c}\le38.3}$ K) accompanies a suppression of magnetic order, demonstrating their competing nature with very similar energy scales. Above the magnetic dome we find anomalous transport properties suggesting a possible pseudogap formation, whereas linear-in-temperature resistivity is observed above the high-${T_{\rm c}}$ phase. The obtained phase diagram highlights unique features among iron-based superconductors, but bears some resemblance to that of high-${T_{\rm c}}$ cuprates.
  • In the heavily hole-doped iron-based superconductors $A$Fe$_2$As$_2$ ($A=$ K, Rb, and Cs), the electron effective mass increases rapidly with alkali-ion radius. To study how the mass enhancement affects the superconducting state, we measure the London penetration depth $\lambda(T)$ in clean crystals of $A$Fe$_2$As$_2$ down to low temperature $T\sim0.1$ K. In all systems, the superfluid stiffness $\rho_s(T)=\lambda^2(0)/\lambda^2(T)$ can be approximated by a power-law $T$ dependence at low temperatures, indicating the robustness of strong momentum anisotropy in the superconducting gap $\Delta(k)$. The power $\alpha$ increases from $\sim1$ with mass enhancement and approaches an unconventional exponent $\alpha\sim 1.5$ in the heaviest CsFe$_2$As$_2$. This appears to be a hallmark of superconductors near antiferromagnetic quantum critical points, where the quasiparticles excited across the anisotropic $\Delta(k)$ are significantly influenced by the momentum dependence of quantum critical fluctuations.
  • We measured the optical conductivity of superconducting LiFeAs. In the superconducting state, the formation of the condensate leads to a spectral-weight loss and yields a penetration depth of 225 nm. No sharp signature of the superconducting gap is observed. This suggests that the system is likely in the clean limit. A Drude-Lorentz parametrization of the data in the normal state reveals a quasiparticle scattering rate supportive of spin fluctuations and proximity to a quantum critical point.
  • We report low-temperature thermal conductivity $\kappa$ of pyrochlore Yb$_2$Ti$_2$O$_7$, which contains frustrated spin-ice correlations with significant quantum fluctuations. In the disordered spin-liquid regime, $\kappa(H)$ exhibits a nonmonotonic magnetic field dependence, which is well explained by the strong spin-phonon scattering and quantum monopole excitations. We show that the excitation energy of quantum monopoles is strongly suppressed from that of dispersionless classical monopoles. Moreover, in stark contrast to the diffusive classical monopoles, the quantum monopoles have a very long mean free path. We infer that the quantum monopole is a novel heavy particle, presumably boson, which is highly mobile in a three-dimensional spin liquid.
  • Junctions and interfaces consisting of unconventional superconductors provide an excellent experimental playground to study exotic phenomena related to the phase of the order parameter. Not only the complex structure of unconventional order parameters have an impact on the Josephson effects, but also may profoundly alter the quasi-particle excitation spectrum near a junction. Here, by using spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy, we visualize the spatial evolution of the local density of states (LDOS) near twin boundaries (TBs) of the nodal superconductor FeSe. The $\pi/2$ rotation of the crystallographic orientation across the TB twists the structure of the unconventional order parameter, which may, in principle, bring about a zero-energy LDOS peak at the TB. The LDOS at the TB observed in our study, in contrast, does not exhibit any signature of a zero-energy peak and an apparent gap amplitude remains finite all the way across the TB. The low-energy quasiparticle excitations associated with the gap nodes are affected by the TB over a distance more than an order of magnitude larger than the coherence length $\xi_{ab}$. The modification of the low-energy states is even more prominent in the region between two neighboring TBs separated by a distance $\approx7\xi_{ab}$. In this region the spectral weight near the Fermi level ($\approx\pm$0.2~meV) due to the nodal quasiparticle spectrum is almost completely removed. These behaviors suggest that the TB induces a fully-gapped state, invoking a possible twist of the order parameter structure which breaks time-reversal symmetry.
  • We investigate the electronic reconstruction across the tetragonal-orthorhombic structural transition in FeSe by employing polarization-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on detwinned single crystals. Across the structural transition, the electronic structures around the G and M points are modified from four-fold to two-fold symmetry due to the lifting of degeneracy in dxz/dyz orbitals. The dxz band shifts upward at the G point while it moves downward at the M point, suggesting that the electronic structure of orthorhombic FeSe is characterized by a momentum-dependent sign-changing orbital polarization. The elongated directions of the elliptical Fermi surfaces (FSs) at the G and M points are rotated by 90 degrees with respect to each other, which may be related to the absence of the antiferromagnetic order in FeSe.
  • Magnetoresistivity \r{ho}xx and Hall resistivity \r{ho}xy in ultra high magnetic fields up to 88T are measured down to 0.15K to clarify the multiband electronic structure in high-quality single crystals of superconducting FeSe. At low temperatures and high fields we observe quantum oscillations in both resistivity and Hall effect, confirming the multiband Fermi surface with small volumes. We propose a novel and independent approach to identify the sign of corresponding cyclotron orbit in a compensated metal from magnetotransport measurements. The observed significant differences in the relative amplitudes of the quantum oscillations between the \r{ho}xx and \r{ho}xy components, together with the positive sign of the high-field \r{ho}xy , reveal that the largest pocket should correspond to the hole band. The low-field magnetotransport data in the normal state suggest that, in addition to one hole and one almost compensated electron bands, the orthorhombic phase of FeSe exhibits an additional tiny electron pocket with a high mobility.