• Transitions metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are direct semiconductors in the atomic monolayer (ML) limit with fascinating optical and spin-valley properties. The strong optical absorption of up to 20 % for a single ML is governed by excitons, electron-hole pairs bound by Coulomb attraction. Excited exciton states in MoSe$_2$ and MoTe$_2$ monolayers have so far been elusive due to their low oscillator strength and strong inhomogeneous broadening. Here we show that encapsulation in hexagonal boron nitride results in emission line width of the A:1$s$ exciton below 1.5 meV and 3 meV in our MoSe$_2$ and MoTe$_2$ monolayer samples, respectively. This allows us to investigate the excited exciton states by photoluminescence upconversion spectroscopy for both monolayer materials. The excitation laser is tuned into resonance with the A:1$s$ transition and we observe emission of excited exciton states up to 200 meV above the laser energy. We demonstrate bias control of the efficiency of this non-linear optical process. At the origin of upconversion our model calculations suggest an exciton-exciton (Auger) scattering mechanism specific to TMD MLs involving an excited conduction band thus generating high energy excitons with small wave-vectors. The optical transitions are further investigated by white light reflectivity, photoluminescence excitation and resonant Raman scattering confirming their origin as excited excitonic states in monolayer thin semiconductors.
  • Charged excitons, or X$^{\pm}$-trions, in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides have binding energies of several tens of meV. Together with the neutral exciton X$^0$ they dominate the emission spectrum at low and elevated temperatures. We use charge tunable devices based on WSe$_2$ monolayers encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride, to investigate the difference in binding energy between X$^+$ and X$^-$ and the X$^-$ fine structure. We find in the charge neutral regime, the X$^0$ emission accompanied at lower energy by a strong peak close to the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon energy. This peak is absent in reflectivity measurements, where only the X$^0$ and an excited state of the X$^0$ are visible. In the $n$-doped regime, we find a closer correspondence between emission and reflectivity as the trion transition with a well-resolved fine-structure splitting of 6~meV for X$^-$ is observed. We present a symmetry analysis of the different X$^+$ and X$^-$ trion states and results of the binding energy calculations. We compare the trion binding energy for the $n$-and $p$-doped regimes with our model calculations for low carrier concentrations. We demonstrate that the splitting between the X$^+$ and X$^-$ trions as well as the fine structure of the X$^-$ state can be related to the short-range Coulomb exchange interaction between the charge carriers.
  • We present a thermal annealing study on single-layer and bilayer (BLG) graphene encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride. The samples are characterized by electron transport and Raman spectroscopy measurements before and after each annealing step. While extracted material properties such as charge carrier mobility, overall doping, and strain are not influenced by the annealing, an initial annealing step lowers doping and strain variations and thus results in a more homogeneous sample. Additionally, the narrow 2D-sub-peak widths of the Raman spectrum of BLG, allow us to extract information about strain and doping values from the correlation of the 2D-peak and the G-peak positions.
  • We developed THz-resonant scanning probe tips, yielding strongly enhanced and nanoscale confined THz near fields at their tip apex. The tips with length in the order of the THz wavelength ({\lambda} = 96.5 {\mu}m) were fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) machining and attached to standard atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers. Measurements of the near-field intensity at the very tip apex (25 nm radius) as a function of tip length, via graphene-based (thermoelectric) near-field detection, indicate their first and second order geometrical antenna resonances for tip length of 33 and 78 {\mu}m, respectively. On resonance, we find that the near-field intensity is enhanced by one order of magnitude compared to tips of 17 {\mu}m length (standard AFM tip length), which is corroborated by numerical simulations that further predict remarkable intensity enhancements of about 107 relative to the incident field. Because of the strong field enhancement and standard AFM operation of our tips, we envision manifold and straightforward future application in scattering-type THz near-field nanoscopy and THz photocurrent nanoimaging, nanoscale nonlinear THz imaging, or nanoscale control and manipulation of matter employing ultrastrong and ultrashort THz pulses.
  • Engineering of cooling mechanisms is a bottleneck in nanoelectronics. Whereas thermal exchanges in diffusive graphene are mostly driven by defect assisted acoustic phonon scattering, the case of high-mobility graphene on hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) is radically different with a prominent contribution of remote phonons from the substrate. A bi-layer graphene on hBN transistor with local gate is driven in a regime where almost perfect current saturation is achieved by compensation of the decrease of the carrier density and Zener-Klein tunneling (ZKT) at high bias. Using noise thermometry, we show that this Zener-Klein tunneling triggers a new cooling pathway due to the emission of hyperbolic phonon polaritons (HPP) in hBN by out-of-equilibrium electron-hole pairs beyond the super-Planckian regime. The combination of ZKT-transport and HPP-cooling promotes graphene on BN transistors as a valuable nanotechnology for power devices and RF electronics.
  • The strong light-matter interaction in transition Metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) monolayers (MLs) is governed by robust excitons. Important progress has been made to control the dielectric environment surrounding the MLs, especially through hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) encapsulation, which drastically reduces the inhomogeneous contribution to the exciton linewidth. Most studies use exfoliated hBN from high quality flakes grown under high pressure. In this work, we show that hBN grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) over a large surface area substrate has a similarly positive impact on the optical emission from TMD MLs. We deposit MoS$_2$ and MoSe$_2$ MLs on ultrathin hBN films (few MLs thick) grown on Ni/MgO(111) by MBE. Then we cover them with exfoliated hBN to finally obtain an encapsulated sample : exfoliated hBN/TMD ML/MBE hBN. We observe an improved optical quality of our samples compared to TMD MLs exfoliated directly on SiO$_2$ substrates. Our results suggest that hBN grown by MBE could be used as a flat and charge free substrate for fabricating TMD-based heterostructures on a larger scale.
  • We study experimentally and theoretically the exciton-phonon interaction in MoSe2 monolayers encapsulated in hexagonal BN, which has an important impact on both optical absorption and emission processes. The exciton transition linewidth down to 1 meV at low temperatures makes it possible to observe high energy tails in absorption and emission extending over several meV, not masked by inhomogeneous broadening. We develop an analytical theory of the exciton-phonon interaction accounting for the deformation potential induced by the longitudinal acoustic phonons, which plays an important role in exciton formation. The theory allows fitting absorption and emission spectra and permits estimating the deformation potential in MoSe2 monolayers. We underline the reasons why exciton-phonon coupling is much stronger in two-dimensional transition metal dichalcodenides as compared to conventional quantum well structures. The importance of exciton-phonon interactions is further highlighted by the observation of a multitude of Raman features in the photoluminescence excitation experiments.
  • All non-interacting two-dimensional electronic systems are expected to exhibit an insulating ground state. This conspicuous absence of the metallic phase has been challenged only in the case of low-disorder, low density, semiconducting systems where strong interactions dominate the electronic state. Unexpectedly, over the last two decades, there have been multiple reports on the observation of a state with metallic characteristics on a variety of thin-film superconductors. To date, no theoretical explanation has been able to fully capture the existence of such a state for the large variety of superconductors exhibiting it. Here we show that for two very different thin-film superconductors, amorphous indium-oxide and a single-crystal of 2H-NbSe2, this metallic state can be eliminated by filtering external radiation. Our results show that these superconducting films are extremely sensitive to external perturbations leading to the suppression of superconductivity and the appearance of temperature independent, metallic like, transport at low temperatures. We relate the extreme sensitivity to the theoretical observation that, in two-dimensions, superconductivity is only marginally stable.
  • Confinement of electrons in graphene to make devices has proven to be a challenging task. Electrostatic methods fail because of Klein tunneling, while etching into nanoribbons requires extreme control of edge terminations, and bottom-up approaches are limited in size to a few nanometers. Fortunately, its mechanical flexibility raises the possibility of using strain to alter graphene's properties and create novel straintronic devices. Here, we report transport studies of nanowires created by linearly-shaped strained regions resulting from individual folds formed by layer transfer onto hexagonal boron nitride. Conductance measurements across the folds reveal Coulomb blockade signatures, indicating confined charges within these structures, which act as quantum dots. Along folds, we observe sharp features in traverse resistivity measurements, attributed to an amplification of the dot conductance modulations by a resistance bridge incorporating the device. Our data indicates ballistic transport up to ~1 um along the folds. Calculations using the Dirac model including strain are consistent with measured bound state energies and predict the existence of valley-polarized currents. Our results show that graphene folds can act as straintronic quantum wires.
  • Graphene (G) is a two-dimensional material with exceptional sensing properties. In general, graphene gas sensors are produced in field effect transistor configuration on several substrates. The role of the substrates on the sensor characteristics has not yet been entirely established. To provide further insight on the interaction between ammonia molecules (NH3) and graphene devices, we report experimental and theoretical studies of NH3 graphene sensors with graphene supported on three substrates: SiO2, talc and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). Our results indicate that the charge transfer from NH3 to graphene depends not only on extrinsic parameters like temperature and gas concentration, but also on the average distance between the graphene sheet and the substrate. We find that the average distance between graphene and hBN crystals is the smallest among the three substrates, and that graphene-ammonia gas sensors based on a G/hBN heterostructure exhibit the fastest recovery times for NH3 exposure and are slightly affected by wet or dry air environment. Moreover, the dependence of graphene-ammonia sensors on different substrates indicates that graphene sensors exhibit two different adsorption processes for NH3 molecules: one at the top of the graphene surface and another at its bottom side close to the substrate. Therefore, our findings show that substrate engineering is crucial to the development of graphene-based gas sensors and indicate additional routes for faster sensors.
  • To reveal the nature of elementary excitations in a quantum spin liquid (QSL), we measured low temperature thermal conductivity and specific heat of 1T-TaS$_2$, a QSL candidate material with frustrated triangular lattice of spin-1/2. The nonzero temperature linear specific heat coefficient $\gamma$ and the finite residual linear term of the thermal conductivity in the zero temperature limit $\kappa_0/T=\kappa/T(T\rightarrow 0)$ are clearly resolved. This demonstrates the presence of highly mobile gapless excitations, which is consistent with fractionalized spinon excitations that form a Fermi surface. Remarkably, an external magnetic field strongly suppresses $\gamma$, whereas it enhances $\kappa_0/T$. This unusual contrasting behavior in the field dependence of specific heat and thermal conductivity can be accounted for by the presence of two types of gapless excitations with itinerant and localized characters, as recently predicted theoretically (I. Kimchi et al., arXiv:1803.00013 (2018)). This unique feature of 1T-TaS$_2$ provides new insights into the influence of quenched disorder on the QSL.
  • Heterostructures formed by stacking layered materials require atomically clean interfaces. However, contaminants are usually trapped between the layers, aggregating into blisters. We report a process to remove such blisters, resulting in clean interfaces. We fabricate blister-free regions of graphene encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride of$\sim$5000$\mu $m$^{2}$, limited only by the size of the exfoliated flakes. These have mobilities up to$\sim$180000cm$^2$V$^{-1}$s$^{-1}$ at room temperature, and$\sim$1.8$\times$10$^6$cm$^2$V$^{-1}$s$^{-1}$ at 9K. We further demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by cleaning heterostructures assembled using graphene intentionally exposed to polymers and solvents. After cleaning, these samples reach similar high mobilities. We also showcase the general applicability of our approach to layered materials by cleaning blisters in other heterostructures based on MoS$_{2}$. This demonstrates that exposure of graphene to processing-related contaminants is compatible with the realization of high mobility samples, paving the way to the development of fab-based processes for the integration of layered materials in (opto)-electronic devices.
  • We have combined spatially-resolved steady-state micro-photoluminescence ($\mu$PL) with time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) to investigate the exciton diffusion in a WSe$_2$ monolayer encapsulated with hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). At 300 K, we extract an exciton diffusion length $L_X= 0.36\pm 0.02 \; \mu$m and an exciton diffusion coefficient of $D_X=14.5 \pm 2\;\mbox{cm}^2$/s. This represents a nearly 10-fold increase in the effective mobility of excitons with respect to several previously reported values on nonencapsulated samples. At cryogenic temperatures, the high optical quality of these samples has allowed us to discriminate the diffusion of the different exciton species : bright and dark neutral excitons, as well as charged excitons. The longer lifetime of dark neutral excitons yields a larger diffusion length of $L_{X^D}=1.5\pm 0.02 \;\mu$m.
  • Minimally twisted bilayer graphene exhibits a lattice of AB and BA stacked regions. At small carrier densities and large displacement field, topological channels emerge and form a network. We fabricate small-angle twisted bilayer graphene and tune it with local gates. In our transport measurements we observe Fabry-P\'erot and Aharanov-Bohm oscillations which are robust in magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 8T. The Fabry-P\'erot trajectories in the bulk of the system cannot be bent by the Lorentz force. By extracting the enclosed length and area we find that the major contribution originates from trajectories encircling one row of AB/BA regions. The robustness in magnetic field and the linear spacing in density testifies to the fact that charge carriers flow in one-dimensional, topologically protected channels.
  • A Metal-dielectric-topological insulator capacitor device based on hBN-encapsulated CVD grown Bi2Se3 is realized and investigated in the radio frequency regime. The RF quantum capacitance and device resistance are extracted for frequencies as a high as 10 GHz, and studied as a function of the applied gate voltage. The combination of the superior quality hBN dielectric gate with the optimized transport characteristics of CVD grown Bi2Se3 (n~10^18cm-3 in 8 nm) allow us to attain a bulk depleted regime by dielectric gating. A quantum capacitance minimum is observed revealing a purely Dirac regime, where the Dirac surface state in proximity to the gate reaches charge neutrality, but the bottom surface Dirac cone remains charged, and couples capacitively to the top surface via the insulating bulk. Our work paves the way towards implementation of topological materials in RF devices.
  • Van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures are an emergent class of metamaterials comprised of vertically stacked two-dimensional (2D) building blocks, which provide us with a vast tool set to engineer their properties on top of the already rich tunability of 2D materials. One of the knobs, the twist angle between different layers, plays a crucial role in the ultimate electronic properties of a vdW heterostructure and does not have a direct analog in other systems such as MBE-grown semiconductor heterostructures. For small twist angles, the moir\'e pattern produced by the lattice misorientation creates a long-range modulation. So far, the study of the effect of twist angles in vdW heterostructures has been mostly concentrated in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) twisted structures, which exhibit relatively weak interlayer interaction due to the presence of a large bandgap in h-BN. Here we show that when two graphene sheets are twisted by an angle close to the theoretically predicted 'magic angle', the resulting flat band structure near charge neutrality gives rise to a strongly-correlated electronic system. These flat bands exhibit half-filling insulating phases at zero magnetic field, which we show to be a Mott-like insulator arising from electrons localized in the moir\'e superlattice. These unique properties of magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene (TwBLG) open up a new playground for exotic many-body quantum phases in a 2D platform made of pure carbon and without magnetic field. The easy accessibility of the flat bands, the electrical tunability, and the bandwidth tunability though twist angle may pave the way towards more exotic correlated systems, such as unconventional superconductors or quantum spin liquids.
  • The electrical evaluation of the crystallinity of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is still limited to the measurement of dielectric breakdown strength, in spite of its importance as the substrate for 2-dimensional van der Waals heterostructure devices. In this study, physical phenomena for degradation and failure in exfoliated single-crystal h-BN films were investigated using the constant-voltage stress test. At low electrical fields, the current gradually reduced and saturated with time, while the current increased at electrical fields higher than ~8 MV/cm and finally resulted in the catastrophic dielectric breakdown. These transient behaviors may be due to carrier trapping to the defect sites in h-BN because trapped carriers lower or enhance the electrical fields in h-BN depending on their polarities. The key finding is the current enhancement with time at the high electrical field, suggesting the accumulation of electrons generated by the impact ionization process. Therefore, a theoretical model including the electron generation rate by impact ionization process was developed. The experimental data support the expected degradation mechanism of h-BN. Moreover, the impact ionization coefficient was successfully extracted, which is comparable to that of SiO2, even though the fundamental band gap for h-BN is smaller than that for SiO2. Therefore, the dominant impact ionization in h-BN could be band-to-band excitation, not defect-assisted impact ionization.
  • We study the infrared cyclotron resonance of high mobility monolayer graphene encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride, and simultaneously observe several narrow resonance lines due to interband Landau level transitions. By holding the magnetic field strength, $B$, constant while tuning the carrier density, $n$, we find the transition energies show a pronounced non-monotonic dependence on the Landau level filling factor, $\nu\propto n/B$. This constitutes direct evidence that electron-electron interactions contribute to the Landau level transition energies in graphene, beyond the single-particle picture. Additionally, a splitting occurs in transitions to or from the lowest Landau level, which is interpreted as a Dirac mass arising from coupling of the graphene and boron nitride lattices.
  • The optical properties of MoS2 monolayers are dominated by excitons, but for spectrally broad optical transitions in monolayers exfoliated directly onto SiO2 substrates detailed information on excited exciton states is inaccessible. Encapsulation in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) allows approaching the homogenous exciton linewidth, but interferences in the van der Waals heterostructures make direct comparison between transitions in optical spectra with different oscillator strength more challenging. Here we reveal in reflectivity and in photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy the presence of excited states of the A-exciton in MoS2 monolayers encapsulated in hBN layers of calibrated thickness, allowing to extrapolate an exciton binding energy of about 220 meV. We theoretically reproduce the energy separations and oscillator strengths measured in reflectivity by combining the exciton resonances calculated for a screened two-dimensional Coulomb potential with transfer matrix calculations of the reflectivity for the van der Waals structure. Our analysis shows a very different evolution of the exciton oscillator strength with principal quantum number for the screened Coulomb potential as compared to the ideal two-dimensional hydrogen model.
  • Van der Waals heterostructures have emerged as promising building blocks that offer access to new physics, novel device functionalities, and superior electrical and optoelectronic properties. Applications such as thermal management, photodetection, light emission, data communication, high-speed electronics and light harvesting require a thorough understanding of (nanoscale) heat flow. Here, using time-resolved photocurrent measurements we identify an efficient out-of-plane energy transfer channel, where charge carriers in graphene couple to hyperbolic phonon polaritons in the encapsulating layered material. This hyperbolic cooling is particularly efficient, giving picosecond cooling times, for hexagonal BN, where the high-momentum hyperbolic phonon polaritons enable efficient near-field energy transfer. We study this heat transfer mechanism through distinct control knobs to vary carrier density and lattice temperature, and find excellent agreement with theory without any adjustable parameters. These insights may lead to the ability to control heat flow in van der Waals heterostructures.
  • Quantum anomalous Hall state is expected to emerge in Dirac electron systems such as graphene under both sufficiently strong exchange and spin-orbit interactions. In pristine graphene, neither interaction exists; however, both interactions can be acquired by coupling graphene to a magnetic insulator (MI) as revealed by the anomalous Hall effect. Here, we show enhanced magnetic proximity coupling by sandwiching graphene between a ferrimagnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) which also serves as a top gate dielectric. By sweeping the top-gate voltage, we observe Fermi level-dependent anomalous Hall conductance. As the Dirac point is approached from both electron and hole sides, the anomalous Hall conductance reaches 1/4 of the quantum anomalous Hall conductance 2e2/h. The exchange coupling strength is determined to be as high as 27 meV from the transition temperature of the induced magnetic phase. YIG/graphene/h-BN is an excellent heterostructure for demonstrating proximity-induced interactions in two-dimensional electron systems.
  • Heterostructures of atomically-thin materials have attracted significant interest owing to their ability to host novel electronic properties fundamentally distinct from their constituent layers. In the case of graphene on boron nitride, the closely-matched lattices yield a moir\'e superlattice that modifies the graphene electron dispersion and opens gaps both at the primary Dirac point (DP) and the moir\'e-induced secondary Dirac point (SDP) in the valence band. While significant effort has focused on controlling the superlattice period via the rotational stacking order, the role played by the magnitude of the interlayer coupling has received comparatively little attention. Here, we modify the interaction between graphene and boron nitride by tuning their separation with hydrostatic pressure. We observe a dramatic enhancement of the DP gap with increasing pressure, but little change in the SDP gap. Our surprising results identify the critical role played by atomic-scale structural deformations of the graphene lattice and reveal new opportunities for band structure engineering in van der Waals heterostructures.
  • Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a natural hyperbolic material that supports both volume-confined hyperbolic polaritons (HPs) and sidewall-confined hyperbolic surface polaritons (HSPs). In this work, we demonstrate effective excitation, control and steering of HSPs in hBN through engineering the geometry and orientation of hBN sidewalls. By combining infrared (IR) nano-imaging and numerical simulations, we investigate the reflection, transmission and scattering of HSPs at the hBN corners with various apex angles. We show that the sidewall-confined nature of HSPs enables a high degree of control over their propagation by designing the geometry of hBN nanostructures.
  • Electron-electron (e-e) collisions can impact transport in a variety of surprising and sometimes counterintuitive ways. Despite strong interest, experiments on the subject proved challenging because of the simultaneous presence of different scattering mechanisms that suppress or obscure consequences of e-e scattering. Only recently, sufficiently clean electron systems with transport dominated by e-e collisions have become available, showing behavior characteristic of highly viscous fluids. Here we study electron transport through graphene constrictions and show that their conductance below 150 K increases with increasing temperature, in stark contrast to the metallic character of doped graphene. Notably, the measured conductance exceeds the maximum conductance possible for free electrons. This anomalous behavior is attributed to collective movement of interacting electrons, which 'shields' individual carriers from momentum loss at sample boundaries. The measurements allow us to identify the conductance contribution arising due to electron viscosity and determine its temperature dependence. Besides fundamental interest, our work shows that viscous effects can facilitate high-mobility transport at elevated temperatures, a potentially useful behavior for designing graphene-based devices.
  • Strongly interacting two dimensional electron systems (2DESs) host a complex landscape of broken symmetry states. The possible ground states are further expanded by internal degrees of freedom such as spin or valley-isospin. While direct probes of spin in 2DESs were demonstrated two decades ago, the valley quantum number has only been probed indirectly in semiconductor quantum wells, graphene mono- and bilayers, and transition-metal dichalcogenides. Here, we present the first direct experimental measurement of valley polarization in a two dimensional electron system, effected via the direct mapping of the valley quantum number onto the layer polarization in bilayer graphene at high magnetic fields. We find that the layer polarization evolves in discrete steps across 32 electric field-tuned phase transitions between states of different valley, spin, and orbital polarization. Our data can be fit by a model that captures both single particle and interaction induced orbital, valley, and spin anisotropies, providing the most complete model of this complex system to date. Among the newly discovered phases are theoretically unanticipated orbitally polarized states stabilized by skew interlayer hopping. The resulting roadmap to symmetry breaking in bilayer graphene paves the way for deterministic engineering of fractional quantum Hall states, while our layer-resolved technique is readily extendable to other two dimensional materials where layer polarization maps to the valley or spin quantum numbers, providing an essential direct probe that is a prerequisite for manipulating these new quantum degrees of freedom.