• The mass-loss process from evolved stars is a key ingredient for our understanding of many fields of astrophysics, including stellar evolution and the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium via stellar yields. One the main unsolved questions is the geometry of the mass-loss process. Taking advantage of the results from the Herschel Mass loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) programme, we initiated a coordinated effort to characterise the geometry of mass loss from evolved red giants at various spatial scales. For this purpose we used the MID-infrared interferometric Instrument (MIDI) to resolve the inner envelope of 14 asymptotic giant branch stars (AGBs) in the MESS sample. In this contribution we present an overview of the interferometric data collected within the frame of our Large Programme, and we also add archive data for completeness. We studied the geometry of the inner atmosphere by comparing the observations with predictions from different geometric models. Asymmetries are detected for five O-rich and S-type, suggesting that asymmetries in the N band are more common among stars with such chemistry. We speculate that this fact is related to the characteristics of the dust grains. Except for one star, no interferometric variability is detected, i.e. the changes in size of the shells of non-mira stars correspond to changes of the visibility of less than 10%. The observed spectral variability confirms previous findings from the literature. The detection of dust in our sample follows the location of the AGBs in the IRAS colour-colour diagram: more dust is detected around oxygen-rich stars in region II and in the carbon stars in region VII. The SiC dust feature does not appear in the visibility spectrum of UAnt and SSct, which are two carbon stars with detached shells. This finding has implications for the theory of SiC dust formation.
  • We present a mid-IR interferometric survey of the circumstellar environment of a specific class of post-Asymptotic Giant Branch (post-AGB) binaries. For this class the presence of a compact dusty disk has been postulated on the basis of various spatially unresolved measurements. Our interferometric survey was performed with the MIDI instrument on the VLTI. In total 19 different systems were observed using variable baseline configurations. Combining all the visibilities at a single wavelength at 10.7 micron, we fitted two parametric models to the data: a uniform disk (UD) and a ring model mimicking a temperature gradient. We compared our observables of the whole sample, with synthetic data computed from a grid of radiative transfer models of passively irradiated disks in hydrostatic equilibrium. These models are computed with a Monte Carlo code that has been widely applied to describe the structure of protoplanetary disks around young stellar objects (YSO). The spatially resolved observations show that the majority of our targets cluster closely together in the distance-independent size-colour diagram, and have extremely compact N-band emission regions. The typical uniform disk diameter of the N-band emission region is about 40 mass which corresponds to a typical brightness temperature of 400-600~K. The resolved objects display very similar characteristics in the interferometric observables and in the spectral energy distributions. Therefore, the physical properties of the disks around our targets must be similar. The grid of protoplanetary disk models covers very well the observed objects. Much like for young stars, the spatially resolved N-band emission region is determined by the hot inner rim of the disk. Continued comparisons between post-AGB and protoplanetary disks will help to understand grain growth and disk evolution processes,
  • A multisite photometric campaign for the Beta Cephei and eclipsing variable 16 Lacertae is reported. 749 h of high-quality differential photoelectric Stromgren, Johnson and Geneva time-series photometry were obtained with ten telescopes during 185 nights. After removing the pulsation contribution, an attempt was made to solve the resulting eclipse light curve by means of the computer program EBOP. Although a unique solution was not obtained, the range of solutions could be constrained by comparing computed positions of the secondary component in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram with evolutionary tracks. For three high-amplitude pulsation modes, the uvy and the Geneva UBG amplitude ratios are derived and compared with the theoretical ones for spherical-harmonic degrees l <= 4. The highest degree, l = 4, is shown to be incompatible with the observations. One mode is found to be radial, one is l = 1, while in the remaining case l = 2 or 3. The present multisite observations are combined with the archival photometry in order to investigate the long-term variation of the amplitudes and phases of the three high-amplitude pulsation modes. The radial mode shows a non-sinusoidal variation on a time-scale of 73 yr. The l = 1 mode is a triplet with unequal frequency spacing, giving rise to two beat-periods, 720.7 d and 29.1 yr. The amplitude and phase of the l = 2 or 3 mode vary on time-scales of 380.5 d and 43 yr. The light variation of 2 And, one of the comparison stars, is discussed in the Appendix.
  • Binaries with circumbinary disks are commonly found among optically bright post-AGB stars. Although clearly linked to binary interaction processes, the formation, evolution and fate of these disks are still badly understood. Due to their compactness, interferometric techniques are required to resolve them. Here, we discuss our high-quality multiwavelength interferometric data of two prototypical yet very different post-AGB binaries, AC and 89 Herculis, as well as the modeling thereof with radiative transfer models. A detailed account of the data and models of both objects is published in three separate papers elsewhere; here we focus on comparing the modeling results for the two objects. In particular we discuss the successes and limitations of the models which were developed for protoplanetary disks around young stars. We conclude that multiwavelength high-angular-resolution observations and radiative transfer disk models are indispensible to understand these complex interacting objects and their place in the grand scheme of the (binary) evolution of low and intermediate mass stars.
  • Red giants are evolved stars which exhibit solar-like oscillations. Although a multitude of stars have been observed with space telescopes, only a handful of red-giant stars were targets of spectroscopic asteroseismic observing projects. We search for solar-like oscillations in the two bright red-giant stars $\gamma$ Psc and $\theta^1$ Tau from time series of ground-based spectroscopy and determine the frequency of the excess of oscillation power $\nu_{max}$ and the mean large frequency separation $\Delta\nu$ for both stars. The radial velocities of $\gamma$ Psc and $\theta^1$ Tau were monitored for 120 and 190 days, respectively. Nearly 9000 spectra were obtained. To reach the accurate radial velocities, we used simultaneous thorium-argon and iodine-cell calibration of our optical spectra. In addition to the spectroscopy, we acquired VLTI observations of $\gamma$ Psc for an independent estimate of the radius. Also 22 days of observations of $\theta^1$ Tau with the MOST-satellite were analysed. The frequency analysis of the radial velocity data of $\gamma$ Psc revealed an excess of oscillation power around 32 $\mu$Hz and a large frequency separation of 4.1$\pm$0.1$\mu$Hz. $\theta^1$ Tau exhibits oscillation power around 90 $\mu$Hz, with a large frequency separation of 6.9$\pm$0.2$\mu$Hz. Scaling relations indicate that $\gamma$ Psc is a star of about $\sim$1 M$_\odot$ and $\sim$10 R$_\odot$. $\theta^1$ Tau appears to be a massive star of about $\sim$2.7 M$_\odot$ and $\sim$11 R$_\odot$. The radial velocities of both stars were found to be modulated on time scales much longer than the oscillation periods. While the mass of $\theta^1$ Tau is in agreement with results from dynamical parallaxes, we find a lower mass for $\gamma$ Psc than what is given in the literature. The long periodic variability agrees with the expected time scales of rotational modulation.
  • The presence of disks and outflows is widespread among post-AGB binaries. In the first paper of this series, a surprisingly large fraction of optical light was found to be resolved in the 89 Her post-AGB system. The data showed this flux to arise from close to the central binary. Scattering off the inner rim of the circumbinary disk, or in a dusty outflow were suggested as two possible origins. With detailed dust radiative transfer models of the disk we aim to discriminate between these two configurations. By including Herschel/SPIRE photometry, we extend the SED such that it now fully covers UV to sub-mm wavelengths. The MCMax radiative transfer code is used to create a large grid of disk models. Our models include a self-consistent treatment of dust settling as well as of scattering. A Si-rich composition with two additional opacity sources, metallic Fe or amorphous C, are tested. The SED is fit together with mid-IR (MIDI) visibilities as well as the optical and near-IR visibilities of Paper I, to constrain the structure of the disk and in particular of its inner rim. The near-IR visibility data require a smooth inner rim, here obtained with a two-power-law parameterization of the radial surface density distribution. A model can be found that fits all the IR photometric and interferometric data well, with either of the two continuum opacity sources. Our best-fit passive models are characterized by a significant amount of mm-sized grains, which are settled to the midplane of the disk. Not a single disk model fits our data at optical wavelengths though, the reason being the opposing constraints imposed by the optical and near-IR interferometric data. A geometry in which a passive, dusty, and puffed-up circumbinary disk is present, can reproduce all the IR but not the optical observations of 89 Her. Another dusty, outflow or halo, component therefore needs to be added to the system.
  • Binary post-AGB stars are interesting laboratories to study both the evolution of binaries as well as the structure of circumstellar disks. A multiwavelength high angular resolution study of the prototypical object 89 Herculis is performed with the aim of identifying and locating the different emission components seen in the SED. A large interferometric data set, collected over the past decade and covering optical and near-IR wavelengths, is analyzed with simple geometric models. Combining the interferometric constraints with the photometry and the optical spectra, we reassess the energy budget of the post-AGB star and its circumstellar environment. We report the first (direct) detection of a large (35-40%) optical circumstellar flux contribution and spatially resolve its emission region. Given this large amount of reprocessed and/or redistributed optical light, the fitted size of the emission region is rather compact and fits with(in) the inner rim of the circumbinary dust disk. This rim dominates our K band data through thermal emission and is rather compact, emitting significantly already at a radius of twice the orbital separation. We interpret the circumstellar optical flux as due to a scattering process, with the scatterers located in the extremely puffed-up inner rim of the disk and possibly also in a bipolar outflow seen pole-on. A non-LTE gaseous origin in an inner disk cannot be excluded but is considered highly unlikely. This direct detection of a significant amount of circumbinary light at optical wavelengths poses several significant questions regarding our understanding of both post-AGB binaries and the physics in their circumbinary disks. Although the identification of the source of emission/scattering remains inconclusive without further study on this and similar objects, the implications are manifold.
  • Stellar parameter determination is a challenging task when dealing with galactic giant stars. The combination of different investigation techniques has proven to be a promising approach. We analyse archive spectra obtained with the Short-Wavelength-Spectrometer (SWS) onboard of ISO, and new interferometric observations from the Very Large Telescope MID-infrared Interferometric instrument (VLTI/MIDI) of a very well studied carbon-rich giant: TX Psc. The aim of this work is to determine stellar parameters using spectroscopy and interferometry. The observations are used to constrain the model atmosphere, and eventually the stellar evolutionary model in the region where the tracks map the beginning of the carbon star sequence. Two different approaches are used to determine stellar parameters: (i) the 'classic' interferometric approach where the effective temperature is fixed by using the angular diameter in the N-band (from interferometry) and the apparent bolometric magnitude; (ii) parameters are obtained by fitting a grid of state-of-the-art hydrostatic models to spectroscopic and interferometric observations. We find a good agreement between the parameters of the two methods. The effective temperature and luminosity clearly place TX Psc in the carbon-rich AGB star domain in the H-R-diagram. Current evolutionary tracks suggest that TX Psc became a C-star just recently, which means that the star is still in a 'quiet' phase compared to the subsequent strong-wind regime. This is in agreement with the C/O ratio being only slightly larger than 1.
  • We report on the discovery of an infrared emission band in the Spitzer spectrum of the S-type AGB star NP Aurigae that is caused by TiO molecules in the circumstellar environment. We modelled the observed emission to derive the temperature of the TiO molecules (\approx 600 K), an upper limit on the column density (\approx 10^17.25 cm^{-2}) and a lower limit on the spatial extent of the layer that contains these molecules. (\approx 4.6 stellar radii). This is the first time that this TiO emission band is observed. A search for similar emission features in the sample of S-type stars yielded two additional candidates. However, owing to the additional dust emission, the identification is less stringent. By comparing the stellar characteristics of NP Aur to those of the other stars in our sample, we find that all stars with TiO emission show large-amplitude pulsations, s-process enrichment, and a low C/O ratio. These characteristics might be necessary requirements for a star to show TiO in emission, but they are not sufficient.
  • The number of publications of aperture-synthesis images based on optical long-baseline interferometry measurements has recently increased due to easier access to visible and infrared interferometers. The interferometry technique has now reached a technical maturity level that opens new avenues for numerous astrophysical topics requiring milli-arcsecond model-independent imaging. In writing this paper our motivation was twofold: 1) review and publicize emblematic excerpts of the impressive corpus accumulated in the field of optical interferometry image reconstruction; 2) discuss future prospects for this technique by selecting four representative astrophysical science cases in order to review the potential benefits of using optical long baseline interferometers. For this second goal we have simulated interferometric data from those selected astrophysical environments and used state-of-the-art codes to provide the reconstructed images that are reachable with current or soon-to-be facilities. The image reconstruction process was "blind" in the sense that reconstructors had no knowledge of the input brightness distributions. We discuss the impact of optical interferometry in those four astrophysical fields. We show that image reconstruction software successfully provides accurate morphological information on a variety of astrophysical topics and review the current strengths and weaknesses of such reconstructions. We investigate how to improve image reconstruction and the quality of the image possibly by upgrading the current facilities. We finally argue that optical interferometers and their corresponding instrumentation, existing or to come, with 6 to 10 telescopes, should be well suited to provide images of complex sceneries.
  • S-type AGB stars are thought to be in the transitional phase between M-type and C-type AGB stars. Because of their peculiar chemical composition, one may expect a strong influence of the stellar C/O ratio on the molecular chemistry and the mineralogy of the circumstellar dust. In this paper, we present a large sample of 87 intrinsic galactic S-type AGB stars, observed at infrared wavelengths with the Spitzer Space Telescope, and supplemented with ground-based optical data. On the one hand, we derive the stellar parameters from the optical spectroscopy and photometry, using a grid of model atmospheres. On the other, we decompose the infrared spectra to quantify the flux-contributions from the different dust species. Finally, we compare the independently determined stellar parameters and dust properties. For the stars without significant dust emission, we detect a strict relation between the presence of SiS absorption in the Spitzer spectra and the C/O ratio of the stellar atmosphere. These absorption bands can thus be used as an additional diagnostic for the C/O ratio. For stars with significant dust emission, we define three groups, based on the relative contribution of certain dust species to the infrared flux. We find a strong link between group-membership and C/O ratio. We show that these groups can be explained by assuming that the dust-condensation can be cut short before silicates are produced, while the remaining free atoms and molecules can then form the observed magnesium sulfides or the carriers of the unidentified 13 and 20 micron features. Finally, we present the detection of emission features attributed to molecules and dust characteristic to C-type stars, such as molecular SiS, hydrocarbons and magnesium sulfide grains. We show that we often detect magnesium sulfides together with molecular SiS and we propose that it is formed by a reaction of SiS molecules with Mg.
  • Our comprehension of stellar evolution on the AGB still faces many difficulties. To improve on this, a quantified understanding of large-amplitude pulsator atmospheres and interpretation in terms of their fundamental stellar parameters are essential. We wish to evaluate the effectiveness of the recently released CODEX dynamical model atmospheres in representing M-type Mira variables through a confrontation with the time-resolved spectro-photometric and interferometric PTI data set of TU And. We calibrated the interferometric K-band time series to high precision. This results in 50 nights of observations, covering 8 subsequent pulsation cycles. At each phase, the flux at 2.2$\mu$m is obtained, along with the spectral shape and visibility points in 5 channels across the K-band. We compared the data set to the relevant dynamical, self-excited CODEX models. Both spectrum and visibilities are consistently reproduced at visual minimum phases. Near maximum, our observations show that the current models predict a photosphere that is too compact and hot, and we find that the extended atmosphere lacks H2O opacity. Since coverage in model parameter space is currently poor, more models are needed to make firm conclusions on the cause of the discrepancies. We argue that for TU And, the discrepancy could be lifted by adopting a lower value of the mixing length parameter combined with an increase in the stellar mass and/or a decrease in metallicity, but this requires the release of an extended model grid.
  • We performed a mid-infrared imaging survey of evolved stars in order to study the dust distribution in circumstellar envelopes around these objects and to better understand the mass-loss mechanism responsible for the formation of these envelopes. During this survey, we resolved for the first time the circumstellar environment of IRAS 17163-3907 (hereinafter IRAS17163), which is one of the brightest objects in the mid-infrared sky, but is surprisingly not well studied. Our aim is to determine the evolutionary status of IRAS 17163 and study its circumstellar environment in order to understand its mass-loss history. We obtained diffraction-limited images of IRAS 17163 in the mid-infrared using VISIR on the VLT. Optical spectra of the object allowed us to determine its spectral type and estimate its distance via the presence of diffuse interstellar bands. We show that IRAS 17163 is a Post-Red Supergiant, possibly belonging to the rare class of Yellow Hypergiants, and is very similar to the well studied object IRC +10420. Our mid-infrared images of IRAS 17163 are the first direct images of this bright mid-infrared source. These images clearly show the presence of a double dusty detached shell around the central star, due to successive ejections of material with a timescale of the order of 400 years and a total circumstellar mass larger than 4 M$_{\odot}$. This indicates that non quiescent mass-loss occurs during this phase of stellar evolution.
  • A close substellar companion has been claimed to orbit the bright sdB star HD 149382 with a period of 2.391d. In order to check this important discovery we gathered 26 high resolution spectra over 55 days with the HERMES spectrograph on the 1.2m Mercator telescope on La Palma, and analyzed the resulting radial velocities. Our data show no sign of any significant radial-velocity periodicities, and from the high precision of our measurements we rule out any RV variations with amplitudes higher than 0.79 km/s on periods shorter than 50 days.
  • We present the methodology and some preliminary results of our study of the relationship between a Mira's pulsating photosphere and its surrounding molecular layer(s) throughout several pulsation cycles, based on spatially resolved data. Our dataset consists of archival narrow-band observations in the near-infrared H and K bands obtained with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer between 1999 and 2006, extended with a few nights of VLTI AMBER low spectral resolution data and near-infrared SAAO photometry. The fitted model is the geometric star + layer model proposed by Perrin et al. (2004), in which the physical parameters (diameter and temperature of star and layer; wavelength dependent optical depth of the layer) are given a sinusoidal time dependence.
  • We aim to (1) set up simple and general analytical expressions to estimate mass-loss rates of evolved stars, and (2) from those calculate estimates for the mass-loss rates of asymptotic giant branch (AGB), red supergiant (RSG), and yellow hypergiant stars in our galactic sample. Rotationally excited lines of CO are a very robust diagnostic in the study of circumstellar envelopes (CSEs). When sampling different layers of the CSE, observations of these molecular lines lead to detailed profiles of kinetic temperature, expansion velocity, and density. A state-of-the-art, nonlocal thermal equilibrium, and co-moving frame radiative transfer code that predicts CO line intensities in the CSEs of late-type stars is used in deriving relations between stellar and molecular-line parameters, on the one hand, and mass-loss rate, on the other. We present analytical expressions for estimating the mass-loss rates of evolved stellar objects for 8 rotational transitions of the CO molecule, apply them to our extensive CO data set covering 47 stars, and compare our results to those of previous studies. Our expressions account for line saturation and resolving of the envelope, thereby allowing accurate determination of very high mass-loss rates. We argue that, for estimates based on a single rotational line, the CO(2-1) transition provides the most reliable mass-loss rate. The mass-loss rates calculated for the AGB stars range from 4x10^-8 Msun/yr up to 8x10^-5 Msun/yr. For RSGs they reach values between 2x10^-7 Msun/yr and 3x10^-4 Msun/yr. The estimates for the set of CO transitions allow time variability to be identified in the mass-loss rate. Possible mass-loss-rate variability is traced for 7 of the sample stars. We find a clear relation between the pulsation periods of the AGB stars and their derived mass-loss rates, with a levelling off at approx. 3x10^-5 Msun/yr for periods exceeding 850 days.
  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produce characteristic infrared emission bands that have been observed in a wide range of astrophysical environments, where carbonaceous material is subjected to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Although PAHs are expected to form in carbon-rich AGB stars, they have up to now only been observed in binary systems where a hot companion provides a hard radiation field. In this letter, we present low-resolution infrared spectra of four S-type AGB stars, selected from a sample of 90 S-type AGB stars observed with the infrared spectrograph aboard the Spitzer satellite. The spectra of these four stars show the typical infrared features of PAH molecules. We confirm the correlation between the temperature of the central star and the centroid wavelength of the 7.9 {\mu}m feature, present in a wide variety of stars spanning a temperature range from 3 000 to 12 000 K. Three of four sources presented in this paper extend this relation towards lower temperatures. We argue that the mixture of hydrocarbons we see in these S-stars has a rich aliphatic component. The fourth star, BZ CMa, deviates from this correlation. Based on the similarity with the evolved binary TU Tau, we predict that BZ CMa has a hot companion as well.
  • We aim to interpret the photometric and spectroscopic variability of the luminous blue variable supergiant HD\,50064 ($V=8.21$).CoRoT space photometry and follow-up high-resolution spectroscopy, with a time base of 137\,d and 169\,d, respectively, was gathered, analysed and interpreted using standard time series analysis and light curve modelling methods as well as spectral line diagnostics.The space photometry reveals one period of 37\,d, which undergoes a sudden amplitude change with a factor 1.6. The pulsation period is confirmed in the spectroscopy, which additionally reveals metal line radial velocity values differing by $\sim 30\,$km\,s$^{-1}$ depending on the spectral line and on the epoch. We estimate \teff$\sim$13\,500\,K, \logg$\sim$1.5 from the equivalent width of Si lines. The Balmer lines reveal that the star undergoes episodes of changing mass loss on a time scale similar to the changes in the photometric and spectroscopic variability, with an average value of $\log\dot{\rm M}\simeq-5$ (in M$_\odot$\,yr$^{-1}$). We tentatively interpret the 37\,d period as due to a strange mode oscillation.
  • CONTEXT: Recent progress in the seismic interpretation of field beta Cep stars has resulted in improvements of the physics in the stellar structure and evolution models of massive stars. Further asteroseismic constraints can be obtained from studying ensembles of stars in a young open cluster, which all have similar age, distance and chemical composition. AIMS: To improve our comprehension of the beta Cep stars, we studied the young open cluster NGC 884 to discover new B-type pulsators, besides the two known beta Cep stars, and other variable stars. METHODS: An extensive multi-site campaign was set up to gather accurate CCD photometry time series in four filters (U, B, V, I) of a field of NGC884. Fifteen different instruments collected almost 77500 CCD images in 1286 hours. The images were calibrated and reduced to transform the CCD frames into interpretable differential light curves. Various variability indicators and frequency analyses were applied to detect variable stars in the field. Absolute photometry was taken to deduce some general cluster and stellar properties. RESULTS: We achieved an accuracy for the brightest stars of 5.7 mmag in V, 6.9 mmag in B, 5.0 mmag in I and 5.3 mmag in U. The noise level in the amplitude spectra is 50 micromag in the V band. Our campaign confirms the previously known pulsators, and we report more than one hundred new multi- and mono-periodic B-, A- and F-type stars. Their interpretation in terms of classical instability domains is not straightforward, pointing to imperfections in theoretical instability computations. In addition, we have discovered six new eclipsing binaries and four candidates as well as other irregular variable stars in the observed field.
  • This paper reports on H-band interferometric observations of Betelgeuse made at the three-telescope interferometer IOTA. We image Betelgeuse and its asymmetries to understand the spatial variation of the photosphere, including its diameter, limb darkening, effective temperature, surrounding brightness, and bright (or dark) star spots. We used different theoretical simulations of the photosphere and dusty environment to model the visibility data. We made images with parametric modeling and two image reconstruction algorithms: MIRA and WISARD. We measure an average limb-darkened diameter of 44.28 +/- 0.15 mas with linear and quadratic models and a Rosseland diameter of 45.03 +/- 0.12 mas with a MARCS model. These measurements lead us to derive an updated effective temperature of 3600 +/- 66 K. We detect a fully-resolved environment to which the silicate dust shell is likely to contribute. By using two imaging reconstruction algorithms, we unveiled two bright spots on the surface of Betelgeuse. One spot has a diameter of about 11 mas and accounts for about 8.5% of the total flux. The second one is unresolved (diameter < 9 mas) with 4.5% of the total flux. Resolved images of Betelgeuse in the H band are asymmetric at the level of a few percent. The MOLsphere is not detected in this wavelength range. The amount of measured limb-darkening is in good agreement with model predictions. The two spots imaged at the surface of the star are potential signatures of convective cells.
  • Either by collimating a fast stellar wind or by driving a jet via accretion in the central system, dusty torii or stable disks may be crucial ingredients for the shaping of PNe. We study the dust distribution in the very young Proto-Planetary Nebule (PPN) IRAS16342-3814, also known as the Water Fountain Nebula, which is known to show strong bipolar characteristics in the shape of two reflection lobes, and high-velocity collimated molecular outlfows. We use the new Mid-IR (MIR) instrument VISIR on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) both in imaging and spectroscopy mode at wavelengths from 8 to 13 micron. We present the first spatially resolved MIR observations of a dusty evolved star obtained with VISIR and find that the improved spatial resolution contradicts previous claims of an elliptical brightness distribution at the heart of IRAS16342: we find the waist region to be dark even in the MIR. We show that the filling angle of the obscuring dust lane, which is made mostly of amorphous silicates, is very large, possibly even close to a spherically symmetric superwind as seen in OH/IR stars. We conclude that, in contrast to the multitude of recent dusty-disk detections in Post-AGB stars and PNe, IRAS16342 does not show this extreme equatorial density enhancement, at least not on the scale of the dusty environment which lends the object its IR appearance. Rather, it appears that the observed precessing jets are shaping the bipolar nature in the remains of a spherically symmetric AGB superwind.
  • Gamma Doradus stars are excellent targets for asteroseismology since the gravity modes present in these stars probe the deep stellar interiors. Mode identification will improve the knowledge of these stars considerably. A selected group of Gamma Doradus stars and some candidates were observed with the Mercator telescope to find and/or confirm the periodicities in the light variations and to derive reliable amplitude ratios in different pass bands. A frequency analysis was performed on all new data obtained in the Geneva photometric system. In order to have more reliable and accurate frequencies, the new data were combined with similar data from the literature and with Hipparcos observations. A set of frequencies that minimized the the residuals in a harmonic fit was searched for while allowing means and amplitudes to vary from one observation set to another. Frequencies and amplitudes in the photometric passbands of the Geneva system are given for 21 Gamma Doradus stars. We report the discovery of HD 74504 as a newly found Gamma Doradus star. Our study provides the first extensive multicolour database for the understanding of gravity modes in F-type stars.
  • Context: Red super-giant (RSG) stars exhibit significant mass loss through a slow and dense wind. They are often considered to be the more massive counter parts of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. While the AGB mass loss is linked to their strong pulsations, the RSG are often only weakly variable. Aim: To study the conditions at the base of the wind, by determining the dust composition in a sample of RSG. The dust composition is thought to be sensitive to the density, temperature and acceleration at the base of the wind. Method: We compile a sample of 27 RSG infrared spectra (ISO-SWS) and supplement these with photometric measurements to obtain the full spectral energy distribution (SED). These data are modelled using a dust radiative transfer code. The results are scrutinised for correlations. Results: We find (1) strong correlations between dust composition, mass-loss rate and stellar luminosity, roughly in agreement with the theoretical dust condensation sequence, (2) the need for a continuous (near-)IR dust opacity and tentatively propose amorphous carbon, and (3) significant differences with AGB star winds: presence of PAHs, absence of 'the' 13 micron band, and a lack of strong water bands. Conclusions: Dust condensation in RSG is found to experience a similar freeze-out process as in AGB stars. Together with the positive effect of the stellar luminosity on the mass-loss rate, this suggests that radiation pressure on dust grains is an important ingredient in the driving mechanism. Still, differences with AGB stars are manifold and thus the winds of RSG deserve separate studies.
  • MWC 297 is a young massive nearby B[e] star. The central star has a large projected rotational velocity of 350 km/s. Despite the wealth of published observations, the nature of this object and its dust-rich surroundings is not well understood. With the present paper, we shed light on the geometrical structure of the circumstellar matter which produces the near- to mid-infrared flux excess, and construct an overall image of the source's appearance and evolutionary status. The H-, K- and N-band brightness distribution of MWC 297 is probed with the ESO interferometric spectrographs AMBER and MIDI. We have obtained visibility measurements on 3 AMBER and 12 MIDI baselines, covering a wide range of spatial frequencies. We have reconstructed the brightness distribution in H, K and N with a geometric model consisting of three Gaussian disks with different extent and brightness temperature. This model can account for the entire near- to mid-IR emission of MWC 297. The near- and mid-IR emission, including the silicate emission at 10 micron, emanates from a very compact region (FWHM < 1.5 AU) around the central star. We argue that the circumstellar matter in the MWC 297 system is organized in a disk, seen under moderate (i < 40 deg) inclination. The disk displays no inner emission-free gap at the resolution of our interferometric data. The low inclination of the disk implies that the actual rotational velocity of the star exceeds its critical velocity. We discuss the impact of this result in terms of the formation of high-mass stars, and the main-sequence evolution of classical Be stars.
  • This paper is an H band interferometric examination of Arcturus, a star frequently used as a spatial and spectral calibrator. Using the IOTA 3 telescope interferometer, we performed spectro-interferometric observation (R~35) of Arcturus. Atmospheric models and prescriptions were fitted to the data to derive the brightness distribution of the photosphere. Image reconstruction was also obtained using two software algorithms: Wisard and Mira. An achromatic power law proved to be a good model of the brightness distribution, with a limb darkening compatible with the one derived from atmospheric model simulations using our Marcs model. A Rosseland diameter of 21.05+/-0.21 was derived, corresponding to an effective temperature of T_eff=4295+/-26 K. No companion was detected from the closure phases, with an upper limit on the brightness ratio of 8e-4 at 1AU. Dynamic range at such distance from the photosphere was established at 1.5e-4 (1sigma rms). An upper limit of 1.7e-3 was also derived for the level of brightness asymmetries present on the photosphere.