• Using synchrotron X-rays and neutron diffraction we disentangle spin-lattice order in highly frustrated ZnCr$_2$O$_4$ where magnetic chromium ions occupy the vertices of regular tetrahedra. Upon cooling below 12.5 K the quandary of anti-aligning spins surrounding the triangular faces of tetrahedra is resolved by establishing weak interactions on each triangle through an intricate lattice distortion. The resulting spin order is however, not simply a N\'{e}el state on strong bonds. A complex co-planar spin structure indicates that antisymmetric and/or further neighbor exchange interactions also play a role as ZnCr$_2$O$_4$ resolves conflicting magnetic interactions.
  • Comprehensive x-ray scattering studies, including resonant scattering at Mn L-edge, Tb L- and M-edges, were performed on single crystals of TbMn2O5. X-ray intensities were observed at a forbidden Bragg position in the ferroelectric phases, in addition to the lattice and the magnetic modulation peaks. Temperature dependences of their intensities and the relation between the modulation wave vectors provide direct evidences of exchange striction induced ferroelectricity. Resonant x-ray scattering results demonstrate the presence of multiple magnetic orders by exhibiting their different temperature dependences. The commensurate-to-incommensurate phase transition around 24 K is attributed to discommensuration through phase slipping of the magnetic orders in spin frustrated geometries. We proposed that the low temperature incommensurate phase consists of the commensurate magnetic domains separated by anti-phase domain walls which reduce spontaneous polarizations abruptly at the transition.
  • We report on DC and pulsed electric field sensitivity of the resistance of mixed valent Mn oxide based La(5/8-y)Pr(y)Ca(3/8)MnO(3) (y = 0.4) single crystals as a function of temperature. The low temperature regime of the resistivity is highly current and voltage dependent. An irreversible transition from high (HR) to a low resistivity (LR) is obtained upon the increase of the electric field up to a temperature dependent critical value (V_c). The current-voltage characteristics in the LR regime as well as the lack of a variation in the magnetization response when V_c is reached indicate the formation of a non-single connected filamentary conducting path. The temperature dependence of V_c indicates the existence of a consolute point where the conducting and insulating phases produce a critical behavior as a consequence of their separation.
  • Epitaxial thin films of multiferroic perovskite BiMnO3 were synthesized on SrTiO3 substrates, and orbital ordering and magnetic properties of the thin films were investigated. The ordering of the Mn^{3+} e_g orbitals at a wave vector (1/4 1/4 1/4) was detected by Mn K-edge resonant x-ray scattering. This peculiar orbital order inherently contains magnetic frustration. While bulk BiMnO3 is known to exhibit simple ferromagnetism, the frustration enhanced by in-plane compressive strains in the films brings about cluster-glass-like properties.
  • Resonant x-ray scattering is performed near the Mn K-absorption edge for an epitaxial thin film of BiMnO3. The azimuthal angle dependence of the resonant (003) peak (in monoclinic indices) is measured with different photon polarizations; for the $\sigma\to\pi'$ channel a 3-fold symmetric oscillation is observed in the intensity variation, while the $\sigma\to\sigma'$ scattering intensity remains constant. These features are accounted for in terms of the peculiar ordering of the manganese 3d orbitals in BiMnO3. It is demonstrated that the resonant peak persists up to 770 K with an anomaly around 440 K; these high and low temperatures coincide with the structural transition temperatures, seen in bulk, with and without a symmetry change, respectively. A possible relationship of the orbital order with the ferroelectricity of the system is discussed.
  • We use a spatially resolved, direct spectroscopic probe for electronic structure with an additional sensitivity to chemical compositions to investigate high-quality single crystal samples of La_{1/4}Pr_{3/8}Ca_{3/8}MnO_{3}, establishing the formation of distinct insulating domains embedded in the metallic host at low temperatures. These domains are found to be at least an order of magnitude larger in size compared to previous estimates and exhibit memory effects on temperature cycling in the absence of any perceptible chemical inhomogeneity, suggesting long-range strains as the probable origin.
  • We report x-ray scattering studies of nanoscale structural correlations in the paramagnetic phases of the perovskite manganites La$_{0.75}$(Ca$_{0.45}$Sr$_{0.55}$)$_{0.25}$MnO$_3$, La$_{0.625}$Sr$_{0.375}$MnO$_3$, and Nd$_{0.45}$Sr$_{0.55}$MnO$_3$. We find that these correlations are present in the orthorhombic $O$ phase in La$_{0.75}$(Ca$_{0.45}$Sr$_{0.55}$)$_{0.25}$MnO$_3$, but they disappear abruptly at the orthorhombic-to-rhombohedral transition in this compound. The orthorhombic phase exhibits increased electrical resistivity and reduced ferromagnetic coupling, in agreement with the association of the nanoscale correlations with insulating regions. In contrast, the correlations were not detected in the two other compounds, which exhibit rhombohedral and tetragonal phases. Based on these results, as well as on previously published work, we propose that the local structure of the paramagnetic phase correlates strongly with the average lattice symmetry, and that the nanoscale correlations are an important factor distinguishing the insulating and the metallic phases in these compounds.
  • We have studied magnetic and transport properties on different manganese oxide based compounds exhibiting phase separation: polycrystalline La5/8-yPryCa3/8MnO3 (y=0.3) and La1/2Ca1/2Mn1-zFezO3 (z = 0.05), and single crystals of La5/8-yPryCa3/8MnO3 (y=0.35). Time dependent effects indicate that the fractions of the coexisting phases are dynamically changing in a definite temperature range. We found that in this range the ferromagnetic fraction f can be easily tuned by application of low magnetic fields (< 1 T). The effect is persistent after the field is turned off, thus the field remains imprinted in the actual value of f and can be recovered through transport measurements. This effect is due both to the existence of a true phase separated equilibrium state with definite equilibrium fraction f0, and to the slow growth dynamics. The fact that the same global features were found on different compounds and in polycrystalline and single crystalline samples, suggests that the effect is a general feature of some phase separated media.
  • We investigated temperature (T)- and magnetic field-dependent optical conductivity spectra (\s\w) of a La_5/8-yPr_yCa_3/8MnO_3 (y~0.35) single crystal, showing intriguing phase coexistence at low T. At T_C < T < T_CO, a dominant charge-ordered phase produces a large optical gap energy of ~0.4 eV. At T < T_C, at least two absorption bands newly emerge below 0.4 eV. Analyses of (\s\w) indicate that the new bands should be attributed to a ferromagnetic metallic and a charge-disordered phase that coexist with the charge-ordered phase. This optical study clearly shows that La_5/8-yPrCa_3/8MnO_3 (y~0.35) is composed of multiphases that might have different lattice strains.
  • We report x-ray scattering studies of nanoscale structural correlations in Nd$_{1-x}$Sr$_x$MnO$_3$ and La$_{1-x}$(Ca,Sr)$_x$MnO$_3$, $x$=0.2--0.5. We find that the correlated regions possess a temperature-independent correlation length of 2-3 lattice constants which is the same in all samples. The period of the lattice modulation of the correlated regions is proportional to the Ca/Sr doping concentration $x$. Remarkably, the lattice modulation periods of these and several other manganites with a ferromagnetic ground state fall on the same curve when plotted as a function of $x$. Thus, the structure of the correlated regions in these materials appears to be determined by a single parameter, $x$. We argue that these observations provide important clues for understanding the Colossal Magnetoresistance phenomenon in manganites.
  • We report synchrotron x-ray scattering studies of charge/orbitally ordered (COO) nanoclusters in Nd$_{0.7}$Sr$_{0.3}$MnO$_3$. We find that the COO nanoclusters are strongly suppressed in an applied magnetic field, and that their decreasing concentration follows the field-induced decrease of the sample electrical resistivity. The COO nanoclusters, however, do not completely disappear in the conducting state, suggesting that this state is inhomogeneous and contains an admixture of an insulating phase. Similar results were also obtained for the zero-field insulator-metal transition that occurs as temperature is reduced. These observations suggest that these correlated lattice distortions play a key role in the Colossal Magnetoresistance effect in this prototypical manganite.
  • Thin films of perovskite manganite La$_{0.7}$Ca$_{0.3}$MnO$_{3}$ were grown epitaxially on various substrates by either the pulsed laser deposition method or laser molecular beam epitaxy. The substrates change both the volume and symmetry of the unit cell of the films. It is revealed that the symmetry as well as the volume of the unit cell have strong influence on the metal-insulator transition temperature and the size of magnetoresistance.
  • The insulator-metal transition in single crystal La(5/8-y)Pr(y)Ca(3/8)MnO3 with y=0.35 was studied using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, electric resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, and specific heat measurements. Despite the dramatic drop in the resistivity at the insulator-metal transition temperature Tmi, the charge-ordering (CO) peaks exhibit no anomaly at this temperature and continue to grow below Tmi. Our data suggest then, that in addition to the CO phase, another insulating phase is present below Tco. In this picture, the insulator-metal transition is due to the changes within this latter phase. The CO phase does not appear to play a major role in this transition. We propose that a percolation-like insulator-metal transition occurs via the growth of ferromagnetic metallic domains within the parts of the sample that do not exhibit charge ordering. Finally, we find that the low-temperature phase-separated state is unstable against x-ray irradiation, which destroys the CO phase at low temperatures.
  • We discovered an unprecedented magnitude of the 1/f noise near the Curie temperature Tc in low-Tc manganites. The scaling behavior of the 1/f noise and the resistance provides strong evidence of the percolation nature of the ferromagnetic transition in the polycrystalline samples. The step-like changes of the resistance with temperature, observed for single crystals, suggest that the size of the ferromagnetic domains depends on the size of crystallites.