• Active galactic nuclei (AGN) show evidence for reprocessing gas, outflowing from the accreting black hole. The combined effects of absorption and scattering from the circumnuclear material likely explains the `hard excess' of X-ray emission above 20 keV, compared with extrapolation of spectra from lower X-ray energies. In a recent {\it Suzaku} study, we established the ubiquitous hard excess in hard X-ray-selected, radio-quiet type\,1 AGNs to be consistent with reprocessing of the X-ray continuum an ensemble of clouds, located tens to hundreds of gravitational radii from the nuclear black hole. Here we add hard X-ray-selected, type\,2 AGN to extend our original study and show that the gross X-ray spectral properties of the entire local population of radio quiet AGN may be described by a simple unified scheme. We find a broad, continuous distribution of spectral hardness ratio and Fe\,K$\alpha$ equivalent width across all AGN types, which can be reproduced by varying the observer's sightline through a single, simple model cloud ensemble, provided the radiative transfer through the model cloud distribution includes not only photoelectric absorption but also 3D Compton scattering. Variation in other parameters of the cloud distribution, such as column density or ionisation, should be expected between AGN, but such variation is not required to explain the gross X-ray spectral properties.
  • Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are axisymmetric systems to first order; their observed properties are likely strong functions of inclination with respect to our line of sight, yet the specific inclinations of all but a few AGN are generally unknown. By determining the inclinations and geometries of nearby Seyfert galaxies using the kinematics of their narrow-line regions (NLRs), and comparing them with observed properties, we find strong correlations between inclination and total hydrogen column density, infrared color, and H-beta full-width at half maximum (FWHM). These correlations provide evidence that the orientation of AGN with respect to our line of sight affects how we perceive them, beyond the Seyfert type dichotomy. They can also be used to constrain 3D models of AGN components such as the broad-line region and torus. Additionally, we find weak correlations between AGN luminosity and several modeled NLR parameters, which suggests that the NLR geometry and kinematics are dependent to some degree on the AGN's radiation field.
  • We present the results of the analysis of the X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert 2 Mrk 348, observed by Suzaku and XMM-Newton. The overall spectrum of Mrk 348 can be described by a primary power law continuum seen through three layers of absorption, of which one is neutral and two are ionised. Comparing Suzaku (2008) and XMM-Newton (2002) observations we find variability of the X-ray spectral curvature. We suggest that the variability can be explained through the change of column density of both the neutral and one of the ionised absorbers, together with a variation of the ionisation level of the same absorber. We thus confirm one of the main features presented in past works, where intrinsic column density variability up to $\sim 10^{23}$~cm$^{-2}$ was observed on time scales of months. We also find that the photon index of the underlying power law continuum ($\Gamma \sim 1.8$) is in agreement with the previous observations of this Seyfert 2.
  • High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the warm absorber in the nearby quasar, MR2251-178 (z = 0.06398) is presented. The observations were carried out in 2011 using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating and the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer, with net exposure times of approximately 400 ks each. A multitude of absorption lines from C to Fe are detected, revealing at least 3 warm absorbing components ranging in ionization parameter from log(\xi/erg cm s^-1) = 1-3 and with outflow velocities < 500 km/s. The lowest ionization absorber appears to vary between the Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, which implies a radial distance of between 9-17 pc from the black hole. Several broad soft X-ray emission lines are strongly detected, most notably from He-like Oxygen, with FWHM velocity widths of up to 10000 km/s, consistent with an origin from Broad Line Region (BLR) clouds. In addition to the warm absorber, gas partially covering the line of sight to the quasar appears to be present, of typical column density N_H = 10^23 cm^-2. We suggest that the partial covering absorber may arise from the same BLR clouds responsible for the broad soft X-ray emission lines. Finally the presence of a highly ionised outflow in the iron K band from both 2002 and 2011 Chandra HETG observations appears to be confirmed, which has an outflow velocity of -15600 \pm 2400 km/s. However a partial covering origin for the iron K absorption cannot be excluded, resulting from low ionization material with little or no outflow velocity.
  • Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) show excess X-ray emission above 10 keV compared with extrapolation of spectra from lower energies. Risaliti et al. have recently attempted to model the hard X-ray excess in the type 1.8 AGN NGC 1365, concluding that the hard excess most likely arises from Compton-scattered reflection of X-rays from an inner accretion disk close to the black hole. Their analysis disfavored a model in which the hard excess arises from a high column density of circumnuclear gas partially covering a primary X-ray source, despite such components being required in the NGC 1365 data below 10 keV. Using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer approach, we demonstrate that this conclusion is invalidated by (i) use of slab absorption models, which have unrealistic transmission spectra for partial covering gas, (ii) neglect of the effect of Compton scattering on transmitted spectra and (iii) inadequate modeling of the spectrum of scattered X-rays. The scattered spectrum is geometry dependent and, for high global covering factors, may dominate above 10 keV. We further show that, in models of circumnuclear gas, the suppression of the observed hard X-ray flux by reprocessing may be no larger than required by the `light bending' model invoked for inner disk reflection, and the expected emission line strengths lie within the observed range. We conclude that the time-invariant `red wing' in AGN X-ray spectra is probably caused by continuum transmitted through and scattered from circumnuclear gas, not by highly redshifted line emission, and that measurement of black hole spin is not possible.
  • We present new Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph observations of the Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051. These data were obtained as part of a coordinated observing program including X-ray observations with the Chandra/High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) Spectrometer and Suzaku. We detected nine kinematic components of UV absorption, which were previously identified using the HST/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. None of the absorption components showed evidence for changes in column density or profile within the \sim 10 yr between the STIS and COS observations, which we interpret as evidence of 1) saturation, for the stronger components, or 2) very low densities, i.e., n_H < 1 cm^-3, for the weaker components. After applying a +200 km s^-1 offset to the HETG spectrum, we found that the radial velocities of the UV absorbers lay within the O VII profile. Based on photoionization models, we suggest that, while UV components 2, 5 and 7 produce significant O VII absorption, the bulk of the X-ray absorption detected in the HETG analysis occurs in more highly ionized gas. Moreover, the mass loss rate is dominated by high ionization gas which lacks a significant UV footprint.
  • A non-proprietary Mission Concept available for presentation to NASA, providing High Area, High Resolution Imaging Spectroscopy and Timing with Arcmin Angular Resolution Submitted in response to NASA 2011 RFI NNH11ZDA018L 'Concepts for the Next NASA X-ray Astronomy Mission'
  • Reverberation from scattering material around the black hole in active galactic nuclei is expected to produce a characteristic signature in a Fourier analysis of the time delays between directly-viewed continuum emission and the scattered light. Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1) are highly variable at X-ray energies, and are ideal candidates for the detection of X-ray reverberation. We show new analysis of a small sample of NLS1 that clearly shows the expected time-delay signature, providing strong evidence for the existence of a high covering fraction of scattering and absorbing material a few tens to hundreds of gravitational radii from the black hole. We also show that an alternative interpretation of time delays in the NLS1 1H0707-495, as arising about one gravitational radius from the black hole, is strongly disfavoured in an analysis of the energy-dependence of the time delays.
  • We consider new Suzaku data for NGC 3516 taken during 2009, along with other recent X-ray observations of the source. The cumulative characteristics of NGC 3516 cannot be explained without invoking changes in the line-of-sight absorption. Contrary to many other well-studied Seyfert galaxies, NGC 3516 does not show a positive lag of hard X-ray photons relative to soft photons over the timescales sampled. In the context of reverberation models for the X-ray lags, the lack of such a signal in NGC 3516 is consistent with flux variations being dominated by absorption changes. The lack of any reverberation signal in such a highly variable source disfavors intrinsic continuum variability in this case. Instead, the colorless flux variations observed at high flux states for NGC 3516 are suggested to be a consequence of Compton-thick clumps of gas crossing the line-of-sight.
  • We present a study of reddening and absorption towards the Narrow Line Regions (NLR) in active galactic nuclei (AGN) selected from the Revised Shapley-Ames, 12mu, and Swift/Burst Alert Telescope samples. For the sources in host galaxies with inclinations of b/a > 0.5, we find that mean ratio of [O III] 5007A, from ground-based observations, and [O IV] 28.59mu, from Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph observations, is a factor of 2 lower in Seyfert 2s than Seyfert 1s. The combination of low [O III]/[O IV] and [O III] 4363/5007 ratios in Seyfert 2s suggests more extinction of emission from the NLR than in Seyfert 1s. Similar column densities of dusty gas, NH ~ several X 10^21 cm^-2, can account for the suppression of both [O III] 5007A and [O III] 4363A, as compared to those observed in Seyfert 1s. Also, we find that the X-ray line OVII 22.1A is weaker in Seyfert 2s, consistent with absorption by the same gas that reddens the optical emission. Using a Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph slitless spectrum of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151, we estimate that only ~ 30% of the [O III] 5007A comes from within 30 pc of the central source, which is insufficient to account for the low [O III]/[OIV] ratios in Seyfert 2s. If Seyfert 2 galaxies have similar intrinsic [OIII] spatial profiles, the external dusty gas must extend further out along the NLR, perhaps in the form of nuclear dust spirals that have been associated with fueling flows towards the AGN.
  • The narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H0707-495 has previously been identified as showing time lags between flux variations in the soft- (0.3-1 keV) and medium-energy (1-4 keV) X-ray bands that oscillate between positive and negative values as a function of the frequency of the mode of variation. Here we measure and analyse the lags also between a harder X-ray band (4-7.5 keV) and the soft and medium bands, using existing XMM-Newton data, and demonstrate that the entire spectrum of lags, considering both the full energy range, 0.3-7.5 keV, and the full frequency range, 10^-5 < nu < 10^-2 Hz, are inconsistent with previous claims of arising as reverberation associated with the inner accretion disk. Instead we demonstrate that a simple reverberation model, in which scattering or reflection is present in all X-ray bands, explains the full set of lags without requiring any ad hoc explanation for the time lag sign changes. The range of time delays required to explain the observed lags extends up to about 1800 s in the hard band. The results are consistent with reverberation caused by scattering of X-rays passing through an absorbing medium whose opacity decreases with increasing energy and that partially-covers the source. A high covering factor of absorbing and scattering circumnuclear material is inferred.
  • We present the broad-band 0.6-150 keV Suzaku and Swift BAT spectra of the low luminosity Seyfert galaxy, NGC 7213. The time-averaged continuum emission is well fitted by a single powerlaw of photon index Gamma = 1.75 and from consideration of the Fermi flux limit we constrain the high energy cutoff to be 350 keV < E < 25 MeV. Line emission from both near-neutral iron K_alpha at 6.39 keV and highly ionised iron, from Fe_(xxv) and Fe_(xxvi), is strongly detected in the Suzaku spectrum, further confirming the results of previous observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton. We find the centroid energies for the Fe_(xxv) and Fe_(xxvi) emission to be 6.60 keV and 6.95 keV respectively, with the latter appearing to be resolved in the Suzaku spectrum. We show that the Fe_(xxv) and Fe_(xxvi) emission can result from a highly photo-ionised plasma of column density N_(H) ~ 3 x 10^(23) cm^(-2). A Compton reflection component, e.g., originating from an optically-thick accretion disc or a Compton-thick torus, appears either very weak or absent in this AGN, subtending < 1 sr to the X-ray source, consistent with previous findings. Indeed the absence of either neutral or ionised Compton reflection coupled with the lack of any relativistic Fe K signatures in the spectrum suggests that an inner, optically-thick accretion disc is absent in this source. Instead, the accretion disc could be truncated with the inner regions perhaps replaced by a Compton-thin Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flow. Thus, the Fe_(xxv) and Fe_(xxvi) emission could both originate in ionised material perhaps at the transition region between the hot, inner flow and the cold, truncated accretion disc on the order of 10^(3) - 10^(4) gravitational radii from the black hole. The origin for the unresolved neutral Fe K_alpha emission is then likely to be further out, perhaps originating in the optical BLR or a Compton-thin pc-scale torus.
  • Long-exposure Suzaku X-ray observations of the active galaxy NGC 4051 from 2005 and 2008 are analysed, in an attempt to reach a self-consistent understanding of the spectral variability on long timescales and at high time resolution. Principal components analysis and a maximum likelihood method of power spectrum analysis are used. In common with other type I AGN, the spectral variability is dominated by a varying-normalisation power-law component together with a quasi-steady, hard-spectrum offset component that contains Fe K atomic features. NGC 4051 displays a strong excess over a power-law at energies above 20 keV, some fraction of which also appears to vary with the power-law continuum. The fast-timescale power spectrum has a shape consistent with previous determinations, but significant differences are found between the low and high flux states of the source, demonstrating that the power spectrum is non-stationary. Frequency-dependent time lags between the hard and soft bands of up to 970+/-225s are measured. The existence of the observed lags excludes the possibility that the hard spectral component originates as reflection from the inner accretion disk. We instead show that the frequency- and energy-dependent time lags may be explained as reverberation, caused by reflection from a thick shell of material with maximum lags of about 10,000s. If the reflecting material surrounds the AGN, it extends to a distance about 1.5x10^14 cm, 600 gravitational radii, from the illuminating source and the global covering factor is C(g) >~ 0.4, confirming suggestions that type I AGN have high covering factors of absorbing and reflecting material. Given the spectral and timing similarities with other type I AGN, we infer that this structure is common in the type I population. [abridged]
  • We report on the highest to date signal-to-noise-ratio X-ray spectrum of the luminous quasar PDS 456, as obtained during two XMM-Newton orbits in September 2007. The present spectrum is considerably different from several previous X-ray spectra recorded for PDS 456 since 1998. The ultra-high-velocity outflow seen as recently as February 2007 is not detected in absorption. Conversely, a significant reflection component is detected. The reflection model suggests the reflecting medium may be outflowing at a velocity v/c = -0.06 +/- 0.02. The present spectrum is analyzed in the context of the previous ones in an attempt to understand all spectra within the framework of a single model. We examine whether an outflow with variable partial covering of the X-ray source along the line of sight that also reflects the source from other lines of sight can explain the dramatic variations in the broad-band spectral curvature of PDS 456. It is established that absorption plays a major role in shaping the spectrum of other epochs, while the 2007 XMM-Newton spectrum is dominated by reflection, and the coverage of the source by the putative outflow is small (< 20%).
  • We present the results from a combined study of the average X-ray spectral and timing properties of 14 nearby AGN. For 11 of the sources in the sample, we used all the available data from the RXTE archive, which were taken until the end of 2006. There are 7795 RXTE observations in total for these AGN, obtained over a period of ~7-11 years. We extracted their 3-20 keV spectra and fitted them with a simple power-law model, modified by the presence of a Gaussian line (at 6.4 keV) and cold absorption, when necessary. We used these best-fit slopes to estimate the mean spectral slope for each object, while we used results from the literature to estimate the average spectral slope of the three objects without archival, monitorin RXTE data. Our results show that the AGN average spectral slopes are not correlated either with the black hole mass or the characteristic frequencies that were detected in the power spectra.They are positively correlated, though, with the characteristic frequency when normalised to the sources black hole mass. This is similar to the spectral-timing correlation that has been observed in Cyg X-1, but not the same.The AGN spectral-timing correlation can be explained if we assume that the accretion rate determines both the average spectral slope and the characteristic time scales in AGN. The spectrum should steepen and the characteristic frequency should increase, proportionally, with increasing accretion rate. We also provide a quantitative expression between spectral slope and accretion rate. Thermal Comptonisation models are broadly consistent with our result, but only if the ratio of the soft photons' luminosity to the power injected to the hot corona is proportionally related to the accretion rate.
  • MCG-6-30-15 is the archetypal example of a type I active galaxy showing broad "red-wing" emission in its X-ray spectrum at energies below the 6.4 keV Fe K-alpha emission line and a continuum excess above 20 keV. Miller et al. (2008) showed that these spectral features could be caused by clumpy absorbing material, but Reynolds et al. (2009) have argued that the observed Fe K-alpha line luminosity is inconsistent with this explanation unless the global covering factor of the absorber(s) is very low. However, the Reynolds et al. calculation effectively considers the only source of opacity to be the Fe K bound-free transition and neglects the opacity at the line energy: correction to realistic opacity decreases the predicted line flux by a large factor. We also discuss the interpretation of the covering factor and the possible effect of occultation by the accretion disk. Finally, we consider a model for MCG-6-30-15 dominated by clumpy absorption, which is consistent with global covering factor 0.45, although models that include the effects of Compton scattering are required to reach a full understanding. Variations in covering fraction may dominate the observed X-ray spectral variability.
  • PDS 456 is a nearby (z=0.184), luminous (L_bol ~10^47 erg/s) type I quasar. A deep 190 ks Suzaku observation in February 2007 revealed the complex, broad band X-ray spectrum of PDS 456. The Suzaku spectrum exhibits highly statistically significant absorption features near 9 keV in the quasar rest--frame. We show that the most plausible origin of the absorption is from blue-shifted resonance (1s-2p) transitions of hydrogen-like iron (at 6.97 keV in the rest frame). This indicates that a highly ionized outflow may be present moving at near relativistic velocities (~0.25c). A possible hard X-ray excess is detected above 15 keV with HXD (at 99.8% confidence), which may arise from high column density gas (Nh>10^24cm^-2) partially covering the X-ray emission, or through strong Compton reflection. Here we propose that the iron K-shell absorption in PDS 456 is associated with a thick, possibly clumpy outflow, covering about 20% of $4\pi$ steradian solid angle. The outflow is likely launched from the inner accretion disk, within 15-100 gravitational radii of the black hole. The kinetic power of the outflow may be similar to the bolometric luminosity of PDS 456. Such a powerful wind could have a significant effect on the co-evolution of the host galaxy and its supermassive black hole, through feedback.
  • X-ray spectroscopy offers an opportunity to study the complex mixture of emitting and absorbing components in the circumnuclear regions of active galactic nuclei, and to learn about the accretion process that fuels AGN and the feedback of material to their host galaxies. We describe the spectral signatures that may be studied and review the X-ray spectra and spectral variability of active galaxies, concentrating on progress from recent Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku data for local type 1 AGN. We describe the evidence for absorption covering a wide range of column densities, ionization and dynamics, and discuss the growing evidence for partial-covering absorption from data at energies > 10 keV. Such absorption can also explain the observed X-ray spectral curvature and variability in AGN at lower energies and is likely an important factor in shaping the observed properties of this class of source. Consideration of self-consistent models for local AGN indicates that X-ray spectra likely comprise a combination of absorption and reflection effects from material originating within a few light days of the black hole as well as on larger scales. It is likely that AGN X-ray spectra may be strongly affected by the presence of disk-wind outflows that are expected in systems with high accretion rates, and we describe models that attempt to predict the effects of radiative transfer through such winds, and discuss the prospects for new data to test and address these ideas.
  • The Seyfert I galaxy MCG-6-30-15 shows one of the best examples of a broad "red wing" of emission in its X-ray spectrum at energies 2 < E < 6.4 keV, commonly interpreted as being caused by relativistically-blurred reflection close to the event horizon of the black hole. We aim to test an alternative model in which absorption creates the observed spectral shape, explains the puzzling lack of variability of the red wing and reduces the high reflection albedo, substantially greater than unity, that is otherwise inferred at energies E > 20 keV. We compiled all the available long-exposure, high-quality data for MCG-6-30-15: 522 ks of Chandra HETGS, 282 ks of XMM-Newton pn/RGS and 253 ks of Suzaku XIS/PIN data. This is the first analysis of this full dataset. We investigated the spectral variability on timescales >20 ks using principal components analysis and fitted spectral models to "flux state" and mean spectra over the energy range 0.5-45 keV (depending on detector). The absorber model was based on the zones previously identified in the high-resolution grating data. Joint fits were carried out to any data that were simultaneous. Multiple absorbing zones covering a wide range of ionisation are required by the grating data, including a highly ionised outflowing zone. A variable partial-covering zone plus absorbed low-ionisation reflection, distant from the source, provides a complete description of the variable X-ray spectrum. A single model fits all the data. We conclude that these zones are responsible for the red wing, its apparent lack of variability, the absorption structure around the Fe K-alpha line, the soft-band "excess" and the high flux seen in the hard X-ray band. A relativistically-blurred Fe line is not required in this model. We suggest the partial covering zone is a clumpy wind from the accretion disk.
  • Context: X-ray surveys of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) indicate `cosmic downsizing', with the comoving number density of high-luminosity objects peaking at higher redshifts (z about 2) than low-luminosity AGN (z<1). Aims: We test whether downsizing is caused by activity shifting towards low-mass black holes accreting at near-Eddington rates, or by a change in the average rate of accretion onto supermassive black holes. We estimate the black hole masses and Eddington ratios of an X-ray selected sample of AGN in the Chandra Deep Field South at z<1, probing the epoch where AGN cosmic downsizing has been reported. Methods: Black hole masses are estimated both from host galaxy stellar masses, which are estimated from fitting to published optical and near-infrared photometry, and from near-infrared luminosities, applying established correlations between black hole mass and host galaxy properties. Both methods give consistent results. Comparison and calibration of possible redshift-dependent effects is also made using published faint host galaxy velocity dispersion measurements. Results: The Eddington ratios in our sample span the range 10^{-5} to 1, with median log(L_bol/L_Edd)=-2.87, and with typical black hole masses about 10^{8} solar masses. The broad distribution of Eddington ratios is consistent with that expected for AGN samples at low and moderate luminosity. We find no evidence that the CDF-S AGN population is dominated by low-mass black holes accreting at near-Eddington ratios and the results suggest that diminishing accretion rates onto average-sized black holes are responsible for the reported AGN downsizing at redshifts below unity.
  • (abridged) The radio-quiet quasar PG1416-129 (z=0.129) exhibits atypical optical and X-ray properties. Between 1990 and 2000, in response to its optical continuum decrease, the ``classical'' broad component of Hbeta almost completely disappeared, with a factor of 10 decrease in the line flux. In the X-ray band, this object was observed by Ginga in 1988 to have the hardest quasar photon index, with Gamma=1.1+/-0.1. We present an XMM/EPIC observation of PG1416-129 performed in July 2004. We analyze the time-averaged pn spectrum of this quasar, as well as perform time-resolved spectroscopy. We find that during the present XMM observation, PG1416-129 still has a rather hard photon index, both in the soft and hard energy ranges, compared to radio-quiet quasars but compatible with the photon index value found for radio-loud quasars. This object also shows long-term luminosity variability over 16 years by a factor of three with a variation of photon index from ~1.2 to ~1.8. In the soft energy band (0.2-2keV), we found a very weak soft X-ray excess compared to other RQ quasars. The whole time averaged spectrum is fit very well either by X-ray ionized reflection from the accretion disk surface, by a warm absorber-emitter plus power-law, or by a smeared absorption/emission from a relativistic outflow. While no constant narrow FeK line at 6.4keV is observed, we find the possible presence of two non-simultaneous transient iron lines: a redshifted narrow iron line at about 5.5keV (96.4% confidence level according to multi-trial Monte-Carlo simulations) at the beginning of this observation and the appearance of a line at 6.3-6.4keV (99.1% c.l.) at the end of the observation. These variable lines could be generated by discrete hot-spots on the accretion disk surface.
  • Aims: We analyse a long XMM-Newton spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 766, using the marked spectral variability on timescales >20ks to separate components in the X-ray spectrum. Methods: Principal components analysis is used to identify distinct emission components in the X-ray spectrum, possible alternative physical models for those components are then compared statistically. Results: The source spectral variability is well-explained by additive variations, with smaller extra contributions most likely arising from variable absorption. The principal varying component, eigenvector one, is found to have a steep (photon index 2.4) power-law shape, affected by a low column of ionised absorption that leads to the appearance of a soft excess. Eigenvector one varies by a factor 10 in amplitude on time-scales of days and appears to have broad ionised Fe K-alpha emission associated with it: the width of the ionised line is consistent with an origin at about 100 gravitational radii. There is also a strong component of near-constant emission that dominates in the low state, whose spectrum is extremely hard above 1 keV, with a soft excess at lower energies, and with a strong edge at Fe K but remarkably little Fe K-alpha emission. Although this component may be explained as relativistically-blurred reflection from the inner accretion disc, we suggest that its spectrum and lack of variability may alternatively be explained as either (i) ionised reflection from an extended region, possibly a disc wind, or (ii) a signature of absorption by a disc wind with a variable covering fraction. Absorption features in the low state may indicate the presence of an outflow.
  • We report on the iron K-alpha line properties of a sample of Seyfert galaxies observed with the XMM-Newton EPIC pn instrument. Using a systematic and uniform analysis, we find that complexity at iron-K is extremely common in the XMM spectra. Once appropriate soft X-ray absorption, narrow 6.4 keV emission and associated Compton reflection are accounted for, ~75 of the sample show an improvement when a further Gaussian component is introduced. The typical properties of the broad emission are both qualitatively and quantitatively consistent with previous results from ASCA. The complexity is in general very well described by relativistic accretion disk models. In most cases the characteristic emission radius is constrained to be within ~50 R_g, where strong gravitational effects become important. We find in about 1/3 of the sample the accretion disk interpretation is strongly favoured over competing models. In a few objects no broad line is apparent. We find evidence for emission within 6 R_g in only two cases, both of which exhibit highly complex absorption. Evidence for black hole spin based on the X-ray spectra therefore remains tentative.
  • We report the detection of redshifted iron K-alpha absorption lines in the Chandra LETG spectrum of the narrow-line quasar, PG 1211+143. The absorption lines are observed at 4.22 keV and 4.93 keV in the quasar spectrum, corresponding to 4.56 keV and 5.33 keV in the rest frame of PG 1211+143. From Monte Carlo simulations, the chance probability of both lines being false detections is low at 1.36e-04. Highly redshifted ionized iron K-alpha (Fe XXV or Fe XXVI) is the most plausible identification for the lines at their observed energies. If identified with H-like iron K-alpha at 6.97 keV, then the relativistic velocity shifts required are 0.40c and 0.26c. The extreme velocities can be explained by pure gravitational redshift if the matter exists in a stable orbit within 6 gravitational radii of the black hole. This would require a Kerr metric for the black hole. Alternatively the absorption may be the result of matter infalling directly onto the black hole, with a maximum observed velocity of 0.38c at 6Rg in the Schwarzschild metric. This matter may originate in a failed outflow or jet, which does not escape the gravitational potential of the black hole.
  • We present new XMM-Newton observation of the Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxy (ULIRG) NGC 6240. We analyze the reflecting grating spectrometer (RGS) data, and data from the other instruments, and find a starburst dominated 0.5-3 keV spectrum with global properties resembling those observed in M82 but with a much higher luminosity. We show that the starburst region can be divided into an outer zone, beyond a radius of about 2.1 kpc, with a gas temperature of about 10^7 K and a central region with temperatures in the range (2-6) x 10^7 K. The gas in the outer region emits most of the observed Oviii Lyman-alpha line and the gas in the inner region the emission lines of higher ionization ions, including a strong Fexxv line. We also identify a small inner part, very close to the active nuclei, with typical Seyfert 2 properties including a large amount of photoionized gas producing a strong Fe K-alpha 6.4 keV line. The combined abundance, temperature and emission measure analysis indicates super solar Ne/O, Mg/O, Si/O, S/O and possibly also Fe/O. The analysis suggests densities in the range of (0.07-0.28) x epsilon^(-1/2) cm^(-3) and a total thermal gas mass of about 4 x 10^8 x epsilon^(1/2) solar masses, where epsilon is the volume filling factor. We used a simple model to argue that a massive starburst with an age of about 2 x 10^7 years can explain most of the observed properties of the source. NGC 6240 is perhaps the clearest case of an X-ray bright luminous AGN, in a merger, whose soft X-ray spectrum is dominated by a powerful starburst.