• Using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have obtained a direct trigonometric parallax for the nearest metal-poor globular cluster, NGC 6397. Although trigonometric parallaxes have been previously measured for many nearby open clusters, this is the first parallax for an ancient metal-poor population -- one that is used as a fundamental template in many stellar population studies. This high-precision measurement was enabled by the HST/WFC3 spatial-scanning mode, providing hundreds of astrometric measurements for dozens of stars in the cluster and also for Galactic field stars along the same sightline. We find a parallax of 0.418 +/- 0.013 +/- 0.018 mas (statistical, systematic), corresponding to a true distance modulus of 11.89 +/- 0.07 +/- 0.09 mag (2.39 +/- 0.07 +/- 0.10 kpc). The V luminosity at the stellar main sequence turnoff implies an absolute cluster age of 13.4 +/- 0.7 +/- 1.2 Gyr.
  • In the color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of globular clusters, when the locus of stars on the horizontal branch (HB) extends to hot temperatures, discontinuities are observed at colors corresponding to ~12,000 K and ~18,000 K. The former is the "Grundahl jump" that is associated with the onset of radiative levitation in the atmospheres of hot subdwarfs. The latter is the "Momany jump" that has remained unexplained. Using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, we have obtained ultraviolet and blue spectroscopy of six hot subdwarfs straddling the Momany jump in the massive globular cluster omega Cen. By comparison to model atmospheres and synthetic spectra, we find that the feature is due primarily to a decrease in atmospheric Fe for stars hotter than the feature, amplified by the temperature dependence of the Fe absorption at these effective temperatures.
  • We report the large effort which is producing comprehensive high-level young star cluster (YSC) catalogues for a significant fraction of galaxies observed with the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) Hubble treasury program. We present the methodology developed to extract cluster positions, verify their genuine nature, produce multiband photometry (from NUV to NIR), and derive their physical properties via spectral energy distribution fitting analyses. We use the nearby spiral galaxy NGC628 as a test case for demonstrating the impact that LEGUS will have on our understanding of the formation and evolution of YSCs and compact stellar associations within their host galaxy. Our analysis of the cluster luminosity function from the UV to the NIR finds a steepening at the bright end and at all wavelengths suggesting a dearth of luminous clusters. The cluster mass function of NGC628 is consistent with a power-law distribution of slopes $\sim -2$ and a truncation of a few times $10^5$ M$_\odot$. After their formation YSCs and compact associations follow different evolutionary paths. YSCs survive for a longer timeframe, confirming their being potentially bound systems. Associations disappear on time scales comparable to hierarchically organized star-forming regions, suggesting that they are expanding systems. We find mass-independent cluster disruption in the inner region of NGC628, while in the outer part of the galaxy there is little or no disruption. We observe faster disruption rates for low mass ($\leq$ $10^4$ M$_\odot$) clusters suggesting that a mass-dependent component is necessary to fully describe the YSC disruption process in NGC628.
  • The Hubble Space Telescope UV Legacy survey of Galactic Globular Clusters (GC) is characterising many different aspects of their multiple stellar populations. The "Grundahl-jump" (G-jump) is a discontinuity in ultraviolet brightness of blue horizontal branch (HB) stars, signalling the onset of radiative metal levitation. The HB Legacy data confirmed that the G-jump is located at the same T$_{eff}$ ($\simeq$11,500 K) in nearly all clusters. The only exceptions are the metal-rich clusters NGC 6388 and NGC 6441, where the G-jump occurs at T$_{eff}\simeq$13-14,000K. We compute synthetic HB models based on new evolutionary tracks including the effect of helium diffusion, and approximately accounting for the effect of metal levitation in a stable atmosphere. Our models show that the G-jump location depends on the interplay between the timescale of diffusion and the timescale of the evolution in the T$_{eff}$ range 11,500 K$\lessapprox$T$_{eff}\lessapprox$14,000 K. The G-jump becomes hotter than 11,500 K only for stars that have, in this T$_{eff}$ range, a helium mass fraction Y>0.35. Similarly high Y values are also consistent with the modelling of the HB in NGC 6388 and NGC 6441. In these clusters we predict that a significant fraction of HB stars show helium in their spectra above 11,500 K, and full helium settling should only be found beyond the hotter G-jump.
  • In some scenarios for the formation of the Milky Way bulge the stellar population at the edges of the boxy bulge may be younger than those on the minor axis, or close to the Galactic center. So far the only bulge region where deep color-magnitude diagrams have been obtained is indeed along the minor axis. To overcome this limitation, we aim at age-dating the bulge stellar populations far away from the bulge minor axis. Color-magnitude diagrams and luminosity functions have been obtained from deep near-IR VLT/HAWK-I images taken at the two Southern corners of the boxy bulge, i.e., near the opposite edges of the Galactic bar. The foreground disk contamination has been statistically removed using a pure disk field observed with the same instrument and located approximately at similar Galactic latitudes of the two bulge fields, and 30deg in longitude away from the Galactic center. For each bulge field, mean reddening and distance are determined using the position of red clump stars, and the metallicity distribution is derived photometrically using the color distribution of stars in the upper red giant branch. The resulting metallicity distribution function of both fields peaks around [Fe/H] -0.1 dex, with the bulk of the stellar population having a metallicity within the range: -1 dex < [Fe/H] <+0.4 dex, quite similar to that of other inner bulge fields. Like for the inner fields previously explored, the color-magnitude diagrams of the two bar fields are consistent with their stellar population being older than ~10 Gyr, with no obvious evidence for the presence of a younger population.
  • We present constraints on the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in two ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, Hercules and Leo IV, based on deep HST/ACS imaging. The Hercules and Leo IV galaxies are extremely low luminosity (M_V = -6.2, -5.5), metal-poor (<[Fe/H]>= -2.4, -2.5) systems that have old stellar populations (> 11 Gyr). Because they have long relaxation times, we can directly measure the low-mass stellar IMF by counting stars below the main-sequence turnoff without correcting for dynamical evolution. Over the stellar mass range probed by our data, 0.52 - 0.77 Msun, the IMF is best fit by a power-law slope of alpha = 1.2^{+0.4}_{-0.5} for Hercules and alpha = 1.3 +/- 0.8 for Leo IV. For Hercules, the IMF slope is more shallow than a Salpeter IMF (alpha=2.35) at the 5.8-sigma level, and a Kroupa IMF (alpha=2.3 above 0.5 Msun) at 5.4-sigma level. We simultaneously fit for the binary fraction, finding f_binary = 0.47^{+0.16}_{-0.14} for Hercules, and 0.47^{+0.37}_{-0.17} for Leo IV. The UFD binary fractions are consistent with that inferred for Milky Way stars in the same mass range, despite very different metallicities. In contrast, the IMF slopes in the UFDs are shallower than other galactic environments. In the mass range 0.5 - 0.8 Msun, we see a trend across the handful of galaxies with directly measured IMFs such that the power-law slopes become shallower (more bottom-light) with decreasing galactic velocity dispersion and metallicity. This trend is qualitatively consistent with results in elliptical galaxies inferred via indirect methods and is direct evidence for IMF variations with galactic environment.
  • We carried out observations of the small jovian satellite Amalthea (J5) as it was being eclipsed by the Galilean satellites near the 2009 equinox of Jupiter in order to apply the technique of mutual event photometry to the astrometric determination of this satellite's position. The observations were carried out during the period 06/2009-09/2009 from the island of Maui, Hawaii and Siding Spring, Australia with the 2m Faulkes Telescopes North and South respectively. We observed in the near-infrared part of the spectrum using a PanStarrs-Z filter with Jupiter near the edge of the field in order to mitigate against the glare from the planet. Frames were acquired at rates >1/min during eclipse times predicted using recent JPL ephemerides for the satellites. Following subtraction of the sky background from these frames, differential aperture photometry was carried out on Amalthea and a nearby field star. We have obtained three lightcurves which show a clear drop in the flux from Amalthea, indicating that an eclipse took place as predicted. These were model-fitted to yield best estimates of the time of maximum flux drop and the impact parameter. These are consistent with Amalthea's ephemeris but indicate that Amalthea is slightly ahead of, and closer to Jupiter than, its predicted position by approximately half the ephemeris uncertainty in these directions. We argue that a ground-based campaign of higher-cadence photometry accurate at the 5% level or better during the next season of eclipses in 2014-15 should yield positions to within 0".5 and affect a corresponding improvement in Amalthea's ephemeris.
  • The primary science goal of the Kepler Mission is to provide a census of exoplanets in the solar neighborhood, including the identification and characterization of habitable Earth-like planets. The asteroseismic capabilities of the mission are being used to determine precise radii and ages for the target stars from their solar-like oscillations. Chaplin et al. (2010) published observations of three bright G-type stars, which were monitored during the first 33.5 days of science operations. One of these stars, the subgiant KIC 11026764, exhibits a characteristic pattern of oscillation frequencies suggesting that it has evolved significantly. We have derived asteroseismic estimates of the properties of KIC 11026764 from Kepler photometry combined with ground-based spectroscopic data. We present the results of detailed modeling for this star, employing a variety of independent codes and analyses that attempt to match the asteroseismic and spectroscopic constraints simultaneously. We determine both the radius and the age of KIC 11026764 with a precision near 1%, and an accuracy near 2% for the radius and 15% for the age. Continued observations of this star promise to reveal additional oscillation frequencies that will further improve the determination of its fundamental properties.
  • We present the first results of the application of supervised classification methods to the Kepler Q1 long-cadence light curves of a subsample of 2288 stars measured in the asteroseismology program of the mission. The methods, originally developed in the framework of the CoRoT and Gaia space missions, are capable of identifying the most common types of stellar variability in a reliable way. Many new variables have been discovered, among which a large fraction are eclipsing/ellipsoidal binaries unknown prior to launch. A comparison is made between our classification from the Kepler data and the pre-launch class based on data from the ground, showing that the latter needs significant improvement. The noise properties of the Kepler data are compared to those of the exoplanet program of the CoRoT satellite. We find that Kepler improves on CoRoT by a factor 2 to 2.3 in point-to-point scatter.
  • The Kepler Mission began its 3.5-year photometric monitoring campaign in May 2009 on a select group of approximately 150,000 stars. The stars were chosen from the ~half million in the field of view that are brighter than 16th magnitude. The selection criteria are quantitative metrics designed to optimize the scientific yield of the mission with regards to the detection of Earth-size planets in the habitable zone. This yields more than 90,000 G-type stars on or close to the Main Sequence, >20,000 of which are brighter than 14th magnitude. At the temperature extremes, the sample includes approximately 3,000 M-type dwarfs and a small sample of O and B-type MS stars <200. Small numbers of giants are included in the sample which contains ~5,000 stars with surface gravities log(g) < 3.5. We present a brief summary of the selection process and the stellar populations it yields in terms of surface gravity, effective temperature, and apparent magnitude. In addition to the primary, statistically-derived target set, several ancillary target lists were manually generated to enhance the science of the mission, examples being: known eclipsing binaries, open cluster members, and high proper-motion stars.
  • Oscillating stars in binary systems are among the most interesting stellar laboratories, as these can provide information on the stellar parameters and stellar internal structures. Here we present a red giant with solar-like oscillations in an eclipsing binary observed with the NASA Kepler satellite. We compute stellar parameters of the red giant from spectra and the asteroseismic mass and radius from the oscillations. Although only one eclipse has been observed so far, we can already determine that the secondary is a main-sequence F star in an eccentric orbit with a semi-major axis larger than 0.5 AU and orbital period longer than 75 days.
  • We use HST/ACS to study the resolved stellar populations of the nearby, nearly edge-on galaxy NGC4244 across its outer disk surface density break. The stellar photometry allows us to study the distribution of different stellar populations and reach very low equivalent surface brightnesses. We find that the break occurs at the same radius for young, intermediate age, and old stars. The stellar density beyond the break drops sharply by a factor of at least 600 in 5 kpc. The break occurs at the same radius independent of height above the disk, but is sharpest in the midplane and nearly disappears at large heights. These results make it unlikely that truncations are caused by a star formation threshold alone: the threshold would have to keep the same radial position from less than 100 Myr to 10 Gyr ago, in spite of potential disturbances such as infall and redistribution of gas by internal processes. A dynamical interpretation of truncation formation is more likely such as due to angular momentum redistribution by bars or density waves, or heating and stripping of stars caused by the bombardment of dark matter sub-halos. The latter explanation is also in quantitative agreement with the small diffuse component we see around the galaxy.
  • We show initial results from our ongoing HST GHOSTS survey of the resolved stellar envelopes of 14 nearby, massive disk galaxies. In hierarchical galaxy formation the stellar halos and thick disks of galaxies are formed by accretion of minor satellites and therefore contain valuable information about the (early) assembly process of galaxies. We detect for the first time the very small halo of NGC4244, a low mass edge-on galaxy. We find that massive galaxies have very extended halos, with equivalent surface brightnesses of 28-29 V-mag/arcsec^2 at 20-30 kpc from the disk. The old RGB stars of the thick disk in the NGC891 and NGC4244 edge-on galaxies truncate at the same radius as the young thin disk stars, providing insights into the formation of both disk truncations and thick disks. We furthermore present the stellar populations of a very low surface brightness stream around M83, the first such a stream resolved into stars beyond those of the Milky Way and M31.
  • TrES-Her0-07621 is a recently discovered detached M Dwarf eclipsing binary system. We present some follow-up observations of this system including new minima times and a refined orbital period. We have also obtained better estimates of the stellar radii and inclination.
  • We would like to investigate the information contained in our observations and to what extent each of them contributes individually to constraining the physical parameters of the system we are investigating. To do this, we present a study involving the technique of Singular Value Decomposition using as a simple example a detached eclipsing binary system. We intend to apply an extension of this technique to asteroseismic measurements of Delta~Scuti stars that are members of eclipsing binary systems.
  • We have imaged the halo populations of a sample of nearby spiral galaxies using the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on broad the Hubble Space Telescope with the aim of studying the stellar population properties and relating them to those of the host galaxies. In four galaxies, the red-giant branch is sufficiently well populated to measure the magnitude of the tip of the red-giant branch (TRGB), a well-known distance indicator. Using both the Sobel edge-detection technique and maximum-likelihood analysis to measure the $I$-band magnitude of the red giant branch tip, we determine distances to four nearby galaxies: NGC 253, NGC 4244, and NGC 4945, NGC 4258. For the first three galaxies, the TRGB distance determined here is more direct, and likely to be more accurate, than previous distance estimates. In the case of NGC 4258, our TRGB distance is in good agreement with the the geometrical maser distance, supporting the the Large Magellanic Cloud distance modulus $(m-M)_0 = 18.50$ that is generally adopted in recent estimates of the Hubble constant.
  • Using the Hubble Space Telescope, we have resolved individual red-giant branch stars in the halos of eight nearby spiral galaxies. The fields lie at projected distances between 2 and 13 kpc along the galaxies' minor axes. The data set allows a first look at the systematic trends in halo stellar populations. We have found that bright galaxies tend to have broad red-giant branch star color distributions with redder mean colors, suggesting that the heavy element abundance spread increases with the parent galaxy luminosity. The mean metallicity of the stellar halo, estimated using the mean colors of red-giant branch stars, correlates with the parent galaxy luminosity. The metallicity of the Milky Way halo falls nearly 1 dex below this luminosity-metallicity relation, suggesting that the halo of the Galaxy is more the exception than the rule for spiral galaxies; i.e., massive spirals with metal-poor halos are unusual. The luminosity-halo stellar abundance relation is consistent with the scaling relation expected for stellar systems embedded in dominant halos, suggesting that the bulk of the halo stellar population may have formed in situ.
  • (Abriged) We report results of a campaign to image the stellar populations in the halos of highly inclined spiral galaxies, with the fields roughly 10 kpc (projected) from the nuclei. We use the F814W (I) and F606W (V) filters in the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, on board the Hubble Space telescope. Extended halo populations are detected in all galaxies. The color-magnitude diagrams appear to be completely dominated by giant-branch stars, with no evidence for the presence of young stellar populations in any of the fields. We find that the metallicity distribution functions are dominated by metal-rich populations, with a tail extending toward the metal poor end. To first order, the overall shapes of the metallicity distribution functions are similar to what is predicted by simple, single-component model of chemical evolution with the effective yields increasing with galaxy luminosity. However, metallicity distributions significantly narrower than the simple model are observed for a few of the most luminous galaxies in the sample. It appears clear that more luminous spiral galaxies also have more metal-rich stellar halos. The increasingly significant departures from the closed-box model for the more luminous galaxies indicate that a parameter in addition to a single yield is required to describe chemical evolution. This parameter, which could be related to gas infall or outflow either in situ or in progenitor dwarf galaxies that later merge to form the stellar halo, tends to act to make the metallicity distributions narrower at high metallicity.
  • We describe a newly-discovered detached M-dwarf eclipsing binary system, the fourth such system known. This system was first observed by the TrES network during a long term photometry campaign of 54 nights. Analysis of the folded light curve indicates two very similar components orbiting each other with a period of 1.12079 +/- 0.00001 days. Spectroscopic observations with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope show the system to consist of two M3e dwarfs in a near-circular orbit. Double-line radial velocity amplitudes, combined with the orbital inclination derived from light-curve fitting, yield Mass total = 0.983 +/- 0.007 solar masses, with component masses M(1) = 0.493 +/- 0.003 and M(2) = 0.489 +/- 0.003 solar masses. The light-curve fit yields component radii of R(1) = 0.453 +/- 0.060 and R(2) = 0.452 +/- 0.050 solar radii. Though a precise parallax is lacking, broadband VJHK colors and spectral typing suggest component absolute magnitudes of M_V(1) = 11.18 +/- 0.30 and M_V(2) = 11.28 +/- 0.30.
  • In the past decade, helioseismology has revolutionized our understanding of the interior structure of the Sun. In the next decade, asteroseismology will place this knowledge into context, by providing structural information for dozens of pulsating stars across the H-R diagram. Solar-like oscillations have already been detected from the ground in a few stars, and several current and planned satellite missions will soon unleash a flood of stellar pulsation data. Deriving reliable seismological constraints from these observations will require a significant improvement to our current analysis methods. We are adapting a computational method, based on a parallel genetic algorithm, to help interpret forthcoming observations of Sun-like stars. This approach was originally developed for white dwarfs and ultimately led to several interesting tests of fundamental physics, including a key astrophysical nuclear reaction rate and the theory of stellar crystallization. The impact of this method on the analysis of pulsating white dwarfs suggests that seismological modeling of Sun-like stars will also benefit from this approach.
  • We present radial-velocity measurements obtained with the ELODIE and AFOE spectrographs for GJ 777 A (HD 190360), a metal-rich ([Fe/H]=0.25) nearby (d=15.9 pc) star in a stellar binary system. A long-period low radial-velocity amplitude variation is detected revealing the presence of a Jovian planetary companion. Some of the orbital elements remain weakly constrained because of the smallness of the signal compared to our instrumental precision. The detailed orbital shape is therefore not well established. We present our best fitted orbital solution: an eccentric (e=0.48) 10.7--year orbit. The minimum mass of the companion is 1.33 M_Jup.
  • HD 89744 is an F7 V star with mass 1.4 M, effective temperature 6166 K, age 2.0 Gy and metallicity [Fe/H]= 0.18. The radial velocity of the star has been monitored with the AFOE spectrograph at the Whipple Observatory since 1996, and evidence has been found for a low mass companion. The data were complemented by additional data from the Hamilton spectrograph at Lick Observatory during the companion's periastron passage in fall 1999. As a result, we have determined the star's orbital wobble to have period P = 256 d, orbital amplitude K = 257 m/s, and eccentricity e = 0.7. From the stellar mass we infer that the companion has minimum mass m2 sin i = 7.2 MJup in an orbit with semi-major axis a2 = 0.88 AU. The eccentricity of the orbit, among the highest known for extra-solar planets, continues the trend that extra-solar planets with semi-major axes greater than about 0.15 AU tend to have much higher eccentricities than are found in our solar system. The high metallicity of the parent star reinforces the trend that parent stars of extra-solar planets tend to have high metallicity
  • The recent spectral analysis of LBDS 53W091 by Spinrad and his collaborators has suggested that this red galaxy at z=1.55 is at least 3.5 Gyr old. This imposes an important constraint on cosmology, suggesting that this galaxy formed at z > 6.5, assuming recent estimates of cosmological parameters. We have performed chi^2 tests to the continuum of this galaxy using its UV spectrum and photometric data (RJHK). We have used the updated Yi models that are based on the Yale tracks. We find it extremely difficult to reproduce such large age estimates, under the assumption of the most probable input parameters. Using the same configuration as in Spinrad et al. (solar abundance models), our analysis suggests an age of approximately 1.4 -- 1.8 Gyr. The discrepancy between Spinrad et al.'s age estimate (based on the 1997 Jimenez models) and ours originates from the large difference in the model integrated spectrum: the Jimenez models are much bluer than the Yi models and the Bruzual \& Charlot (BC) models. Preliminary tests favor the Yi and BC models. The updated age estimate of LBDS 53W091 would suggest that this galaxy formed approximately at z=2-3.
  • We present Faint Object Camera (FOC) ultraviolet images of the central 14x14'' of Messier 31 and Messier 32. The hot stellar population detected in the composite UV spectra of these nearby galaxies is partially resolved into individual stars, and their individual colors and apparent magnitudes are measured. We detect 433 stars in M 31 and 138 stars in M 32, down to detection limits of m_F275W = 25.5 mag and m_F175W = 24.5 mag. We investigate the luminosity functions of the sources, their spatial distribution, their color-magnitude diagrams, and their total integrated far-UV flux. Although M 32 has a weaker UV upturn than M 31, the luminosity functions and color-magnitude diagrams of M 31 and M 32 are surprisingly similar, and are inconsistent with a majority contribution from any of the following: PAGB stars more massive than 0.56 Msun, main sequence stars, or blue stragglers. Both the the luminosity functions and color-magnitude diagrams are consistent with a dominant population of stars that have evolved from the extreme horizontal branch (EHB) along tracks with masses between 0.47 and 0.53 Msun. These stars are well below the detection limits of our images while on the zero-age EHB, but become detectable while in the more luminous (but shorter) AGB-Manque' and post-early asymptotic giant branch (PEAGB) phases. The FOC observations require that only a only a very small fraction of the main sequence population (2% in M 31 and 0.5% in M 32) in these two galaxies evolve though the EHB and post-EHB phases, with the remainder evolving through bright PAGB evolution that is so rapid that few if any stars are expected in the small field of view covered by the FOC.