• We present Herschel PACS observations of the [CII] 158 micron emission line in a sample of 24 intermediate mass (9<logM$_\ast$/M$_\odot$<10) and low metallicity (0.4< Z/Z$_\odot$<1.0) galaxies from the xCOLD GASS survey. Combining them with IRAM CO(1-0) measurements, we establish scaling relations between integrated and molecular region [CII]/CO(1-0) luminosity ratios as a function of integrated galaxy properties. A Bayesian analysis reveals that only two parameters, metallicity and offset from the star formation main sequence, $\Delta$MS, are needed to quantify variations in the luminosity ratio; metallicity describes the total dust content available to shield CO from UV radiation, while $\Delta$MS describes the strength of this radiation field. We connect the [CII]/CO luminosity ratio to the CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor and find a multivariate conversion function $\alpha_{CO}$, which can be used up to z~2.5. This function depends primarily on metallicity, with a second order dependence on $\Delta$MS. We apply this to the full xCOLD GASS and PHIBSS1 surveys and investigate molecular gas scaling relations. We find a flattening of the relation between gas mass fraction and stellar mass at logM$_\ast$/M$_\odot$<10. While the molecular gas depletion time varies with sSFR, it is mostly independent of mass, indicating that the low L$_{CO}$/SFR ratios long observed in low mass galaxies are entirely due to photodissociation of CO, and not to an enhanced star formation efficiency.
  • We examine the HI-based star formation efficiency (SFE_HI), the ratio of star formation rate to the atomic Hydrogen (HI) mass, in the context of a constant stability star-forming disk model. Our observations of HI-selected galaxies show SFE to be fairly constant (log SFE_HI = -9.65 yr-1 with a dispersion of 0.3 dex) across ~5 orders of magnitude in stellar masses. We present a model to account for this result, whose main principle is that the gas within galaxies forms a uniform stability disk and that stars form within the molecular gas in this disk. We test two versions of the model differing in the prescription that determines the molecular gas fraction, based on either the hydrostatic pressure, or the stellar surface density of the disk. For high-mass galaxies such as the Milky Way, we find that either prescription predicts SFE_HI similar to the observations. However, the hydrostatic pressure prescription is a more accurate SFE_HI predictor for low-mass galaxies. Our model is the first model that links the uniform SFE_HI observed in galaxies at low redshifts to star-forming disks with constant marginal stability. While the rotational amplitude Vmax is the primary driver of disk structure in our model, we find the specific angular momentum of the galaxy may play a role in explaining a weak correlation between SFE_HI and effective surface brightness of the disk.
  • Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 91 (HCG 91) were observed with the WiFeS integral field spectrograph as part of our ongoing campaign targeting the ionized gas physics and kinematics inside star forming members of compact groups. Here, we report the discovery of HII regions with abundance and kinematic offsets in the otherwise unremarkable star forming spiral HCG 91c. The optical emission line analysis of this galaxy reveals that at least three HII regions harbor an oxygen abundance ~0.15 dex lower than expected from their immediate surroundings and from the abundance gradient present in the inner regions of HCG 91c. The same star forming regions are also associated with a small kinematic offset in the form of a lag of 5-10 km/s with respect to the local circular rotation of the gas. HI observations of HCG 91 from the Very Large Array and broadband optical images from Pan-STARRS suggest that HCG 91c is caught early in its interaction with the other members of HCG 91. We discuss different scenarios to explain the origin of the peculiar star forming regions detected with WiFeS, and show that evidence point towards infalling and collapsing extra-planar gas clouds at the disk-halo interface, possibly as a consequence of long-range gravitational perturbations of HCG 91c from the other group members. As such, HCG 91c provides evidence that some of the perturbations possibly associated with the early phase of galaxy evolution in compact groups impact the star forming disk locally, and on sub-kpc scales.
  • Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) display a range in structures (from single/compact to clumpy/extended) that is different from typical local star-forming galaxies. Recently, we have introduced a sample of rare, nearby (z<0.3) starbursts that appear to be good analogs of LBGs. These "Lyman Break Analogs" (LBAs) provide an excellent training set for understanding starbursts at different redshifts. We present an application of this by comparing the rest-frame UV/optical morphologies of 30 LBAs with those of sBzK galaxies at z~2, and LBGs at z~3-4 in the HUDF. The UV/optical colors and sizes of LBAs and LBGs are very similar, while the BzK galaxies are somewhat redder and larger. There is significant overlap between the morphologies (G, C, A and M_20) of the local and high-z samples, although the latter are somewhat less concentrated and clumpier. We find that in the majority of LBAs the starbursts appear to be triggered by interactions/mergers. When the images of the LBAs are degraded to the same sensitivity and resolution as the images of LBGs and BzK galaxies, these relatively faint asymmetric features are no longer detectable. This effect is particularly severe in the rest-frame UV. It has been suggested that high-z galaxies experience intense bursts unlike anything seen locally, possibly due to cold flows and instabilities. In part, this is based on the fact that the majority (~70%) of LBGs do not show morphological signatures of mergers. Our results suggest that this evidence is insufficient, since a large fraction of such signatures would likely have been missed in current observations of z>2 galaxies. This leaves open the possibility that clumpy accretion and mergers remain important in driving the evolution of these starbursts, together with rapid gas accretion through other means.
  • We present HST UV/optical imaging, Spitzer mid-IR photometry, and optical spectroscopy of a sample of 30 low-redshift (z=0.1-0.3) galaxies chosen from SDSS/GALEX to be accurate local analogs of the high-z Lyman Break Galaxies. The Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs) are similar in mass, metallicity, dust, SFR, size and gas velocity dispersion, thus enabling a detailed investigation of processes that are important at high-z. The optical emission line properties of LBAs are also similar to those of LBGs, indicating comparable conditions in their ISM. In the UV, LBAs are characterized by complexes of massive star-forming "clumps", while in the optical they most often show evidence for (post-)mergers/interactions. In 6 cases, we find an extremely massive (>10^9 Msun) compact (R~100 pc) dominant central object (DCO). The DCOs are preferentially found in LBAs with the highest mid-IR luminosities and correspondingly high SFRs (15-100 Msun/yr). We show that the massive SF clumps (including the DCOs) have masses much larger than the nuclear super star clusters seen in normal late type galaxies. However, the DCOs have masses, sizes, and densities similar to the excess-light/central-cusps seen in typical elliptical galaxies with masses similar to the LBA galaxies. We suggest that the DCOs form in present-day examples of the dissipative mergers at high redshift that are believed to have produced the central-cusps in local ellipticals. More generally, the properties of the LBAs are consistent with the idea that instabilities in a gas-rich disk lead to very massive star-forming clumps that eventually coalesce to form a spheroid. We speculate that the DCOs are too young at present to be growing a supermassive black hole because they are still in a supernova-dominated outflow phase.
  • Many results in modern astrophysics rest on the notion that the Initial Mass Function (IMF) is universal. Our observations of HI selected galaxies in the light of H-alpha and the far-ultraviolet (FUV) challenge this notion. The flux ratio H-alpha/FUV from these two star formation tracers shows strong correlations with the surface-brightness in H-alpha and the R band: Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies have lower ratios compared to High Surface Brightness galaxies and to expectations from equilibrium star formation models using commonly favored IMF parameters. Weaker but significant correlations of H-alpha/FUV with luminosity, rotational velocity and dynamical mass are found as well as a systematic trend with morphology. The correlated variations of H-alpha/FUV with other global parameters are thus part of the larger family of galaxy scaling relations. The H-alpha/FUV correlations can not be due to dust correction errors, while systematic variations in the star formation history can not explain the trends with both H-alpha and R surface brightness. LSB galaxies are unlikely to have a higher escape fraction of ionizing photons considering their high gas fraction, and color-magnitude diagrams. The most plausible explanation for the correlations are systematic variations of the upper mass limit and/or slope of the IMF at the upper end. We outline a scenario of pressure driving the correlations by setting the efficiency of the formation of the dense star clusters where the highest mass stars form. Our results imply that the star formation rate measured in a galaxy is highly sensitive to the tracer used in the measurement. A non-universal IMF also calls into question the interpretation of metal abundance patterns in dwarf galaxies and star formation histories derived from color magnitude diagrams. Abridged.
  • We have analysed FUSE far-UV spectra of a sample of 16 local starbursts. These galaxies span ranges of almost three orders-of-magnitude in star formation rate and over two orders-of-magnitude in stellar mass. We find that the strongest interstellar absorption-lines are generally blueshifted relative to the galaxy systemic velocity by ~50 to 300 km/s, implying the presence of starburst-driven galactic outflows. The outflow velocites increase on-average with the star formation rate and the star formation rate per unit mass. We find that outflowing coronal-phase (T ~ several hundred thousand K) gas detected via the OVI 1032 absorption line in nearly every galaxy. The kinematics of this outflowing gas differs from the lower-ionization material, and agrees with predictions for radiatively cooling gas (most likely created at the interface between the hot outrushing gas traced by X-rays and cool ambient material). Emission from the coronal gas is not generally detected, implying that radiative cooling by this phase is not affecting the dynamics/energetics of the wind. We find that the weaker interstellar absorption lines lie close to the systemic velocity, implying that the outflowing gas has a lower column density than the quiescent gas in the starburst. From direct observation below the Lyman edge and from the small residual intensity at the core of the CII 1036 line, we conclude that the absolute escape fraction of ionizing radiation is small (typically less than a few percent). This sample provides a unique window on the global properties of local starburst galaxies and a useful comparison sample for understanding spectra of high redshift galaxies.
  • We study the ultraviolet to far-infrared (hereafter UV-to-IR) SEDs of a sample of intermediate redshift (0.2 < z < 0.7) UV-selected galaxies from the ELAIS-N1 and ELAIS-N2 fields by fitting a multi-wavelength dataset to a library of GRASIL templates. Star formation related properties of the galaxies are derived from the library of models by using the Bayesian statistics. We find a decreasing presence of galaxies with low attenuation and low total luminosity as redshift decreases, which does not hold for high total luminosity galaxies. In addition the dust attenuation of low mass galaxies increases as redshift decreases, and this trend seems to disappear for galaxies with M* > 10^11 M_sun. This result is consistent with a mass dependent evolution of the dust to gas ratio, which could be driven by a mass dependent efficiency of star formation in star forming galaxies. The specific star formation rates (SSFR) decrease with increasing stellar mass at all redshifts, and for a given stellar mass the SSFR decreases with decreasing redshift. The differences in the slope of the M*--SSFR relation found between this work and others at similar redshift could be explained by the adopted selection criteria of the samples which, for a UV selected sample, favours blue, star forming galaxies.
  • We examine the properties of the diffuse hard X-ray emission in the classic starburst galaxy M82. We use new Chandra ACIS-S observations in combination with reprocessed archival Chandra ACIS-I and XMM-Newton observations. We find E~6.7 keV Fe He-alpha emission is present in the central |r| < 200 pc, |z| < 100 pc of M82 in all datasets at high statistical significance, in addition to a possibly non-thermal X-ray continuum and marginally significant E=6.4 keV Fe K-alpha line emission. No statistically significant Fe emission is found in the summed X-ray spectra of the point-like X-ray sources or the ULX in the two epochs of Chandra observation. The total nuclear region iron line fluxes in the 2004 April 21 XMM-Newton observation are consistent with those of the Chandra-derived diffuse component, but in the 2001 May 6 XMM-Newton observation they are significantly higher and also both E=6.4 and E=6.9 keV iron lines are detected. We attribute the excess iron line emission to the Ultra-Luminous X-ray source in its high state. In general the iron K-shell luminosity of M82 is dominated by the diffuse component. The total X-ray luminosity of the diffuse hard X-ray emission (corrected for emission by unresolved low luminosity compact objects) is L_X ~ 4.4 x 10^39 erg/s in the E=2-8 keV energy band, and the 6.7 keV iron line luminosity is L_X ~ (1.1 -- 1.7) x 10^38 erg/s. The 6.7 keV iron line luminosity is consistent with that expected from the previously unobserved metal-enriched merged supernova ejecta that is thought to drive the larger-scale galactic superwind. The iron line luminosity implies a thermal pressure within the starburst region of P/k ~ 2 x 10^7 K/cm^3, which is consistent with independent observational estimates of the starburst region pressure [Abstract abridged].
  • We introduce the Survey for Ionization in Neutral Gas Galaxies (SINGG), a census of star formation in HI-selected galaxies. The survey consists of H-alpha and R-band imaging of a sample of 468 galaxies selected from the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS). The sample spans three decades in HI mass and is free of many of the biases that affect other star forming galaxy samples. We present the criteria for sample selection, list the entire sample, discuss our observational techniques, and describe the data reduction and calibration methods. This paper focuses on 93 SINGG targets whose observations have been fully reduced and analyzed to date. The majority of these show a single Emission Line Galaxy (ELG). We see multiple ELGs in 13 fields, with up to four ELGs in a single field. All of the targets in this sample are detected in H-alpha indicating that dormant (non-star forming) galaxies with M(HI) > ~3e7 M_sun are very rare. A database of the measured global properties of the ELGs is presented. The ELG sample spans four orders of magnitude in luminosity (H-alpha and R-band), and H-alpha surface brightness, nearly three orders of magnitude in R surface brightness and nearly two orders of magnitude in H-alpha equivalent width (EW). The surface brightness distribution of our sample is broader than that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic sample, the (EW) distribution is broader than prism-selected samples, and the morphologies found include all common types of star forming galaxies (e.g. irregular, spiral, blue compact dwarf, starbursts, merging and colliding systems, and even residual star formation in S0 and Sa spirals). (abridged)
  • We synthesize the rest-frame Stroemgren colors using SDSS spectra for 99,088 galaxies selected from Data Release 1. This narrow-band ~200 AA photometric system (uz, vz, bz, yz), first designed for the determination of effective temperature, metallicity and gravity of stars, measures the continuum spectral slope of galaxies in the rest-frame 3200-5800 AA wavelength range. Galaxies form a remarkably narrow locus (~0.03 mag) in the resulting color-color diagram. The Bruzual & Charlot population synthesis models suggest that the position of a galaxy along this locus is controlled by a degenerate combination of metallicity and age of the dominant stellar population. Galaxy distribution along the locus is bimodal, with the local minimum corresponding to an ~1 Gyr old single stellar population. The position perpendicular to the locus is independent of metallicity and age, and reflects the galaxy's dust content, as implied by both the models and the statistics of IRAS detections. A comparison of this locus with the galaxy locus in the H_delta-D_n(4000) diagram, utilized by Kauffmann et al. (2003) to estimate stellar masses, reveals a tight correlation, although the two analyzed spectral ranges barely overlap. Overall, the galaxy spectral energy distribution in the entire UV to near-IR range can be described as a single-parameter family with an accuracy of 0.1 mag, or better. This nearly one-dimensional distribution of galaxies in the multi-dimensional space of measured parameters strongly supports the conclusion of Yip et al. (2004), based on a principal component analysis, that SDSS galaxy spectra can be described by a small number of eigenspectra. Apparently, the contributions of stellar populations that dominate the optical emission from galaxies are combined in a simple and well-defined way.
  • We derive observed Halpha and R band luminosity densities of an HI-selected sample of nearby galaxies using the SINGG sample to be l_Halpha' = (9.4 +/- 1.8)e38 h_70 erg s^-1 Mpc^-3 for Halpha and l_R' = (4.4 +/- 0.7)e37 h_70 erg s^-1 A^-1 Mpc^-3 in the R band. This R band luminosity density is approximately 70% of that found by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This leads to a local star formation rate density of log(SFRD) = -1.80 +0.13/-0.07(random) +/- 0.03(systematic) + log(h_70) after applying a mean internal extinction correction of 0.82 magnitudes. The gas cycling time of this sample is found to be t_gas = 7.5 +1.3/-2.1 Gyr, and the volume-averaged equivalent width of the SINGG galaxies is EW(Halpha) = 28.8 +7.2/-4.7 A (21.2 +4.2/-3.5 A without internal dust correction). As with similar surveys, these results imply that SFRD(z) decreases drastically from z ~ 1.5 to the present. A comparison of the dynamical masses of the SINGG galaxies evaluated at their optical limits with their stellar and HI masses shows significant evidence of downsizing: the most massive galaxies have a larger fraction of their mass locked up in stars compared with HI, while the opposite is true for less massive galaxies. We show that the application of the Kennicutt star formation law to a galaxy having the median orbital time at the optical limit of this sample results in a star formation rate decay with cosmic time similar to that given by the SFRD(z) evolution. This implies that the SFRD(z) evolution is primarily due to the secular evolution of galaxies, rather than interactions or mergers. This is consistent with the morphologies predominantly seen in the SINGG sample.
  • Using FORS2 at the ESO VLT we obtained medium resolution (R ~ 2000) spectra of 12 galaxies with 2.37 < z < 3.40 in the FORS Deep Field. Two individual spectra with good S/N and a composite of all 12 spectra were used to derive properties of the stellar and interstellar absorption lines of galaxies in this redshift range. Systematic differences between the individual spectra were found for the strength and profiles of the intrinsic interstellar lines. For eight spectra with sufficient S/N we measured the `1370' and `1425' metallicity indices. From these indices we find for our sample that galaxies at z > 3 have lower mean metallicity than galaxies at 2.5 < z < 3. However there remain uncertainties concerning the absolute calibration of the metallicity tracers in use for high-redshift galaxies. Additional modeling will be needed to resolve these uncertainties.
  • This work presents the main ultraviolet (UV) and far-infrared (FIR) properties of two samples of nearby galaxies selected from the GALEX ($\lambda = 2315$\AA, hereafter NUV) and IRAS ($\lambda = 60\mu$m) surveys respectively. They are built in order to get detection at both wavelengths for most of the galaxies. Star formation rate (SFR) estimators based on the UV and FIR emissions are compared. Systematic differences are found between the SFR estimators for individual galaxies based on the NUV fluxes corrected for dust attenuation and on the total IR luminosity. A combined estimator based on NUV and IR luminosities seems to be the best proxy over the whole range of values of SFR. Although both samples present similar average values of the birthrate parameter b, their star-formation-related properties are substantially different: NUV-selected galaxies tend to show larger values of $b$ for lower masses, SFRs and dust attenuations, supporting previous scenarios for the star formation history (SFH). Conversely, about 20% of the FIR-selected galaxies show high values of $b$, SFR and NUV attenuation. These galaxies, most of them being LIRGs and ULIRGs, break down the downsizing picture for the SFH, however their relative contribution per unit volume is small in the local Universe. Finally, the cosmic SFR density of the local Universe is estimated in a consistent way from the NUV and IR luminosities.
  • The ELAIS S1 field was observed by GALEX in both its Wide Spectroscopic and Deep Imaging Survey modes. This field was previously observed by the Infrared Space Observatory and we made use of the catalogue of multi-wavelength data published by the ELAIS consortium to select galaxies common to the two samples. Among the 959 objects with GALEX spectroscopy, 88 are present in the ELAIS catalog and 19 are galaxies with an optical spectroscopic redshift. The distribution of redshifts covers the range $0<z<1.6$. The selected galaxies have bolometric IR luminosities $10<Log(L_{IR})<13$ (deduced from the $15 \mu m$ flux using ISOCAM) which means that we cover a wide range of galaxies from normal to Ultra Luminous IR Galaxies. The mean ($\sigma$) UV luminosity (not corrected for extinction) amounts to $Log(\lambda.L_{1530}) = 9.8 (0.6)$ $L_\sun$ for the low-z ($z \le 0.35$) sample. The UV slope $\beta$ (assuming $f_\lambda \propto \lambda^\beta$) correlates with the GALEX FUV-NUV color if the sample is restricted to galaxies below $z < 0.1$. Taking advantage of the UV and IR data, we estimate the dust attenuation from the IR/UV ratio and compare it to the UV slope $\beta$. We find that it is not possible to uniquely estimate the dust attenuation from $\beta$ for our sample of galaxies. These galaxies are highly extinguished with a median value $A_{FUV} = 2.7 \pm 0.8$. Once the dust correction applied, the UV- and IR-based SFRs correlate. For the closest galaxy with the best quality spectrum, we see a feature consistent with being produced by a bump near 220nm in the attenuation curve.
  • We use the far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) images of M83 obtained by GALEX to compute the radial profile of the UV spectral slope in the star forming disk. We briefly present a model of its chemical evolution which allows us to obtain realistic intrinsic properties of the stellar populations. Using corollary data, we also compute the profiles of H-alpha/H-beta and of the total IR (TIR) to FUV ratio. Both data and model are used to estimate and compare the extinction gradients at the FUV wavelength obtained from these various indicators. We discuss the implications for the determination of the star formation rate.
  • The total ultraviolet (UV) flux (from 1412 to 2718 AA) of M 101 is compared on a pixel-to-pixel basis with the total far-infrared (FIR) flux (from 60 to 170 micron), using the maps of the galaxy taken by GALEX in the near-UV and far-UV and by ISOPHOT at 60, 100 and 170 micron. The main result of this investigation is the discovery of a tight dependence of the FIR/UV ratio on radius, with values monotonically decreasing from around 4 in the nuclear region to nearly zero towards the edge of the optical disk. Although the tightness of this dependence is in part attributable to resolution effects, the result is consistent with the presence of a large-scale distribution of diffuse dust having a face-on optical depth which decreases with radius and which dominates over the more localized variations in opacity between the arm and interarm regions. We also find a trend for the FIR/UV ratio to take on higher values in the regions of diffuse interarm emission than in the spiral-arm regions, at a given radius. This is interpreted quantitatively in terms of the escape probability of UV photons from spiral arms and their subsequent scattering in the interarm regions, and in terms of the larger relative contribution of optical photons to the heating of the dust in the interarm regions.
  • We compare the dust attenuation properties of two samples of galaxies purely selected in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) band (1750-2750 A, lambda_m = 2310 A) and in the far-infrared (FIR) at 60micron. These samples are built using the GALEX and IRAS sky surveys over ~600 square degrees. The NUV selected sample contains 95 galaxies detected down to NUV=16mag (AB system). 83 galaxies in this sample are spirals or irregulars and only two of them are not detected at 60micron. The FIR selected sample is built from the IRAS PSCz catalog complete down to 0.6Jy. Among the 163 sources, we select 118 star forming galaxies well measured by IRAS, all but 1 are detected in NUV and 14 galaxies are not detected in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) band (1350-1750 A, lambda_m = 1530 A). The dust to ultraviolet (NUV and FUV) flux ratio is calibrated to estimate the dust attenuation at both wavelengths. The median value of the attenuation in NUV is found to be ~1 mag for the NUV selected sample versus ~2 mag for the FIR selected one. Within both samples, the dust attenuation is found to correlate with the luminosity of the galaxies. Almost all the NUV selected galaxies and 2/3 of the FIR selected sample exhibit a lower dust attenuation than that expected from the tight relation found previously for starburst galaxies between the dust attenuation and the slope of the ultraviolet continuum. The situation is inverse for one third of the FIR selected galaxies: their extinction is higher than that deduced from their FUV-NUV color and the relation valid for starbursts.
  • We present ultraviolet photometry for a sample of morphologically early-type galaxies selected by matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 1 with the GALEX Medium and All-sky Imaging Surveys. We obtain a working sample of 1032 early-type galaxies with GALEX FUV detections, SDSS spectroscopy, and $z<0.2$. Using the SDSS spectra to identify galaxies with even weak star formation or evidence of AGN, and further removing galaxies with any evidence of non early-type morphology, we derive a final sample of 172 red quiescent early-type galaxies. We find that the $FUV-r$ color has a full range of 5 mag. Plotting against the $FUV-r$ color the metallicity sensitive Lick $\rm Mg_2$ and D4000 indices, and the stellar velocity dispersion, we find no correlation between our measurement of UV rising flux, and any parameter sensitive to metallicity.
  • M32, the compact elliptical-galaxy companion to the Andromeda spiral galaxy has been imaged by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) in two ultraviolet bands, centered at ~1500 (FUV) and 2300 Angstroms (NUV). The imaging data have been carefully decomposed so as to properly account for the complicated background contamination from the disk of M31. We have derived the surface brightness and color profiles finding a slightly positive color gradient of Delta(FUV-B)/Delta log(r)=+0.15+/-0.03 within one effective radius. Earlier data from the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope suggested that M32 had an extremely large (negative) FUV-optical color gradient (Delta(FUV-B)/Delta log(r)<-2), inverted with respect to the majority of gradients seen in giant elliptical galaxies. Our new results show that, despite of its very low UV-upturn, M32 has similar UV properties to those observed in luminous elliptical galaxies.
  • The NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite has obtained simultaneous near and far ultraviolet light curves of the ROTSE-I Catalog RR Lyrae ab-type variable star J143753.84+345924.8. A series of 38 GALEX Deep Imaging Survey observations well distributed in phase within the star's 0.56432d period shows an AB=4.9mag variation in the far UV (1350-1750A) band and an AB=1.8mag variation in the near UV (1750-2750A) band, compared with only a 0.8mag variation in the broad, unfiltered ROTSE-I (4500-10000A) band. These GALEX UV observations are the first to reveal a large RR Lyrae amplitude variation at wavelengths below 1800A. We compare the GALEX and ROTSE-I observations to predictions made by recent Kurucz stellar atmosphere models. We use published physical parameters for the comparable period (0.57433d), well-observed RR Lyrae star WY Antliae to compute predicted FUV, NUV, and ROTSE-I light curves for J143753.84+345924.8. The observed light curves agree with the Kurucz predictions for [Fe/H]=-1.25 to within AB=0.2mag in the GALEX NUV and ROTSE-I bands, and within 0.5mag in the FUV. At all metallicities between solar and one hundredth solar, the Kurucz models predict 6-8mag of variation at wavelengths between 1000-1700A. Other variable stars with similar temperature variations, such as Cepheids, should also have large-amplitude FUV light curves, observable during the ongoing GALEX imaging surveys.
  • We investigate how the empirical properties of hot X-ray-emitting gas in a sample of seven starburst and three normal edge-on spiral galaxies (a sample which covers the full range of star-formation intensity found in disk galaxies) correlate with the size, mass, star formation rate and star formation intensity in the host galaxies. Intriguingly, the diffuse X-ray properties of the normal spirals (both in their disks and halos) fall where extrapolation of the trends from the starburst galaxies with superwinds would predict. We demonstrate that the luminosity of diffuse X-ray emission in both disk and halo is directly proportional to the rate of mechanical energy feedback from massive stars. Nevertheless, with only three non-starburst normal spiral galaxies it is hard to exclude an accretion-based origin for extra-planar diffuse X-ray emission around normal star-forming galaxies. Larger galaxies have more extended X-ray-emitting halos, but galaxy mass appears to play no role in determining the properties of the disk or extra-planar X-ray emitting plasma. The combination of these luminosity and size correlations leads to a correlation between the surface brightness of the diffuse X-ray emission and the mean star formation rate per unit area in the disk (L_FIR/D_25^2). We argue that the crucial spatial region around a galaxy that controls whether gas in starburst-driven superwinds will escape into the IGM is not the outer halo ~100 kpc from the host galaxy, but the inner few halo scale heights, within ~20 kpc of the galaxy plane. Given the properties of the gaseous halos we observe, superwind outflows from disk galaxies of mass M ~ 10^10 -- 10^11 Msun should still eject some fraction of their material into the IGM. (abstract abridged)
  • We present arcsecond resolution Chandra X-ray and ground-based optical H-alpha imaging of a sample of ten edge-on star-forming disk galaxies (seven starburst and three ``normal'' spiral galaxies), a sample which covers the full range of star-formation intensity found in disk galaxies. We use the unprecedented spatial resolution of the Chandra X-ray observatory to robustly remove point sources, and hence obtain the X-ray properties of the diffuse thermal emission alone. The X-ray observations are combined with comparable-resolution H-alpha and R-band imaging, and presented as a mini-atlas of images on a common spatial and surface brightness scale. The vertical distribution of the halo-region X-ray surface brightness is best described as an exponential, with the observed scale heights lying in the range H_eff = 2 -- 4 kpc. The ACIS X-ray spectra of extra-planar emission from all these galaxies can be fit with a common two-temperature spectral model with an enhanced alpha-to-iron element ratio. This is consistent with the origin of the X-ray emitting gas being either metal-enriched merged SN ejecta or shock-heated ambient halo or disk material with moderate levels of metal depletion onto dust. The thermal X-ray emission observed in the halos of the starburst galaxies is either this pre-existing halo medium, which has been swept-up and shock heated by the starburst-driven wind, or wind material compressed near the walls of the outflow by reverse shocks within the wind. In either case the X-ray emission provides us with a powerful probe of the properties of gaseous halos around star-forming disk galaxies.
  • We present optical and near-IR spectroscopy of a z=2.38 hyperluminous IR galaxy, covering the restframe wavelength range from 1000-5000A. It appears to comprise two components separated by less than 1" on the sky (<8kpc); one component (B) is blue, the other (P) is red in restframe UV-optical colours. The combined system has an optical luminosity of ~8L* and its restframe optical spectrum is characteristic of a Seyfert AGN. However, its restframe UV spectrum exhibits striking features associated with young stars, including P-Cygni lines from stellar winds and blue-shifted interstellar absorption lines indicative of a galactic outflow. Redshifts are derived from stellar photospheric lines in the UV and from narrow emission lines in the restframe optical, and these are compared to that measured for the molecular gas recently detected with the IRAM interferometer. The offsets indicate that the far-IR emission is most likely associated with the near-IR source P, which hosts the Seyfert nucleus, while the UV-bright component B is blueshifted by 400km/s. This suggests that the two components are probably merging and the resulting gravitational interactions have triggered the hyperluminous activity. Modelling of the UV spectral features implies that the starburst within the UV component of this system has been going on for at least ~10Myrs. Assuming that the bolometrically-dominant obscured component has a similar lifetime, we estimate that it has so far formed a total stellar mass of ~10^11 Mo. If this star formation continues at its present level for substantially longer, or if this activity is repeated, then the present-day descendant of N2 850.4 will be a very luminous galaxy.
  • In this contribution we present a few selected examples of how the latest generation of space-based instrumentation -- NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) -- are finally answering old questions about the influence of massive star feedback on the warm and hot phases of the ISM and IGM. In particular, we discuss the physical origin of the soft thermal X-ray emission in the halos of star-forming and starburst galaxies, its relationship to extra-planar H-alpha emission, and plasma diagnostics using FUSE observations of O VI absorption and emission.