• We present results from luminosity, energy and polarization studies at a future Linear Collider. We compare e+e- and e-e- modes of operation and consider both NLC and TESLA beam parameter specifications at a center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV. Realistic colliding beam distributions are used, which include dynamic effects of the beam transport from the Damping Rings to the Interaction Point. Beam-beam deflections scans and their impact for beam-based feedbacks are considered. A transverse kink instability is studied, including its impact on determining the luminosity-weighted center-of-mass energy. Polarimetry in the extraction line from the IP is presented, including results on beam distributions at the Compton IP and at the Compton detector.
  • Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) can play an important role by not only increasing the energy spread and emittance of a beam, but also leading to a potential instability. Previous studies of the CSR induced longitudinal instability were carried out for the CSR impedance due to dipole magnets. However, many storage rings include long wigglers where a large fraction of the synchrotron radiation is emitted. This includes high-luminosity factories such as DAPHNE, PEP-II, KEK-B, and CESR-C as well as the damping rings of future linear colliders. In this paper, the instability due to the CSR impedance from a wiggler is studied assuming a large wiggler parameter $K$. The primary consideration is a low frequency microwave-like instability, which arises near the pipe cut-off frequency. Detailed results are presented on the growth rate and threshold for the damping rings of several linear collider designs. Finally, the optimization of the relative fraction of damping due to the wiggler systems is discussed for the damping rings.
  • Earlier RDDS (Rounded Damped Detuned Structures) [1,2], designed, fabricated and tested at SLAC, in collaboration with KEK, have been shown to damp wakefields successfully. However, electrical breakdown has been found to occur in these structures and this makes them inoperable at the desired gradient. Recent results [3] indicate that lowering the group velocity of the accelerating mode reduces electrical breakdown events. In order to preserve the filling time of each structure a high synchronous phase advance (150 degrees as opposed to 120 used in previous NLC designs) has been chosen. Here, damping of the wakefield is analyzed. Manifold damping and interleaving of structure cell frequencies is discussed. These wakefields impose alignment tolerances on the cells and on the structure as a whole. Tolerance calculations are performed and these are compared with analytic estimations.
  • Compensation of optics errors at the Interaction Point (IP) is essential for maintaining maximum luminosity at the NLC. Several correction systems (knobs) using the Final Focus sextupoles have been designed to provide orthogonal compensation of linear and the second order optics aberrations at IP. Tuning effects of these knobs on the 250 GeV beam were verified using tracking simulations.
  • Realistic calculation of NLC luminosity has been performed using particle tracking in DIMAD and beam-beam simulations in GUINEA-PIG code for various values of beam emittance, energy and beta functions at the Interaction Point (IP). Results of the simulations are compared with analytic luminosity calculations. The optimum range of IP beta functions for high luminosity was identified.
  • We explore the NLC linac optics compatible with a low energy scenario where initially only part of the full linac is installed. Optics modification suitable for a low energy beam running and upgrade to the nominal energy is discussed. Linac parameters and beam tolerances in the modified lattice are compared to the nominal design.
  • Recent experiments at SLAC [1,2] and CERN [3] have revealed evidence of significant deformation in the form of "pitting" of the cells of the 1.8m series of structures DDS/RDDS (Damped Detuned Structure/Rounded Damped Detuned Structure). This pitting occurs in the high group velocity (vg /c = 0.012) end of the accelerating structure and little evidence of breakdown has been found in the lower group velocity end of the structure. Additional, albeit preliminary experimental evidence, suggests that shorter and lower group velocity structures have reduced breakdown events with increasing accelerating field strengths. Two designs are presented here, firstly a 90cm structure consisting of 83 cells with an initial vg/c = 0.0506 (known as H90VG5) and secondly, an even shorter structure of length 60cm consisting of 55 cells with an initial vg /c = 0.03 (known as H60VG3). The feasibility of using these structures to accelerate a charged beam over 10km is investigated. The particular issue focussed upon is suppression of the dipole wakefields via detuning of the cell frequencies and by locally damping individual cells in order to avoid BBU (Beam Break Up). Results are presented on beam-induced dipole wakefields and on the beam dynamics encountered on tracking the progress of the beam through several thousand accelerating structures. [1] C. Adolphsen, ROAA003, this conf. [2] R.H. Miller et al, FPAH062, this conf. [3] L. Groening et al, MPPH039, this conf
  • The NLC extraction line provides a secondary focal point with a low beta function and 2 cm dispersion which can be used for measurement of the beam energy spectrum. In this study, tracking simulations were performed to transport the 0.5 TeV electron beam from the Interaction Point (IP) to the secondary focus (SF), ``measure'' the resultant transverse beam profile and reconstruct the disrupted IP energy spread. In the simulation, the obtained energy spectrum reproduced the initial IP spread reasonably well, especially with the vertical dispersion at SF which provides larger ratio of dispersion to the betatron beam size.
  • Properties of the disrupted NLC beam at the Interaction Point (IP) and particle loss in the extraction line are analyzed as a function of beam-to-beam position and angular offset at IP. The simulations show that disruption and beam loss maximize when the vertical beam separation at IP is about 20 times the rms vertical beam size. The horizontal offset does not increase the disruption and the beam loss. The angular offsets cause particle loss in the extraction line mainly because of the beam orbit oscillations.
  • The two main functions of the NLC extraction line include: 1) transmission of the outgoing disrupted beam and secondary particles to the dump with minimal losses; and 2) beam diagnostics and control. In this report, we describe the extraction line optics, present the results of tracking studies, and discuss the extraction line instrumentation.
  • In this note, we briefly review the current lattice of the NLC extraction line which was designed for the nominal NLC beam parameters. Then we describe the beam parameters for the high luminosity option with larger beam disruption parameter and discuss its effect on beam loss in the extraction line. Finally, we present a summary of the optics study aimed at minimizing the beam loss with high disruption beams.
  • An electron/positron linear collider with a center-of-mass energy between 0.5 and 1 TeV would be an important complement to the physics program of the LHC in the next decade. The Next Linear Collider (NLC) is being designed by a US collaboration (FNAL, LBNL, LLNL, and SLAC) which is working closely with the Japanese collaboration that is designing the Japanese Linear Collider (JLC). The NLC main linacs are based on normal conducting 11 GHz rf. This paper will discuss the technical difficulties encountered as well as the many changes that have been made to the NLC design over the last year. These changes include improvements to the X-band rf system as well as modifications to the injector and the beam delivery system. They are based on new conceptual solutions as well as results from the R&D programs which have exceeded initial specifications. The net effect has been to reduce the length of the collider from about 32 km to 25 km and to reduce the number of klystrons and modulators by a factor of two. Together these lead to significant cost savings.
  • We present a new conceptual and optical design for the Next Linear Collider post-linac collimation system. Energy collimation and passive protection against off-energy beams are achieved in a system with large horizontal dispersion and vertical betatron functions. Betatron collimation is performed in a relatively low-beta (FODO-like) lattice in which only thin spoilers intercept particles near the beam core, while thick absorbers maintain a large stay-clear from the beam. Two possible schemes for the spoilers are considered: one in which the spoilers are capable of tolerating a certain number of damaging interceptions per collider run ("consumable" spoilers), and one in which the spoilers are potentially damaged on every machine pulse and are self-repairing ("renewable" spoilers). The collimation efficiency of the system is evaluated, considering both halo particles which are rescattered into the beam and muon secondaries which are passed to the interaction region. We conclude that the new design is a promising candidate for the NLC post-linac system.
  • In the JLC/NLC X-band linear collider, it is essential to reduce the long-range dipole wakefields in the accelerator structure to prevent beam break up (BBU) and emittance degradation. The two methods of reducing the long-range wakefields are detuning and damping. Detuning reduces the wakefields rapidly as the dipole modes de-cohere but, with a finite number of modes, the wakefield will grow again as the modes re-cohere. In contrast, damping suppresses the wakefields at a longer distance. There are two principal damping schemes: synchronous damping using HOM manifolds such as that used in the RDDS1 structure and local damping similar to that used in the CLIC structure. In a locally damped scheme, one can obtain almost any Q value, however, the damping can have significant effects on the accelerating mode. In this paper, we present a medium local-damping scheme where the wakefields are controlled to meet the BBU requirement while minimizing the degradations of the fundamental rf parameters. We will address the load design and pulse heating issues associated with the medium damping scheme.
  • In the NLC (Next Linear Collider) small misalignments in each of the individual accelerator structures (or the accelerator cells) will give rise to wakefields which kick the beam from its electrical axis. This wakefield can cause BBU (Beam Break Up) or at the very least it will dilute the emittance of the beam. Several Gaussian detuned structures have been designed and tested [1] at SLAC and in this paper we explore new distributions with possibly better damping properties. The progress of the beam through approximately 5,000 structures is monitored in phase space and results on this are presented. [1] J.W. Wang et al, TUA03, LINAC2000
  • The main linacs of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) will contain several thousand X-band RDDS (Rounded Damped Detuned Structures). The transverse wakefield in the structures is reduced by detuning the modal frequencies such that they destructively interfere and by four damping manifolds per structure which provide weak damping. Errors in the fabrication of the individual cells and in the alignment of the cells will reduce the cancellation of the modes. Here, we calculate the tolerances on random errors in the synchronous frequencies of the cells and the cell-to-cell alignment.