• We present scaling relations between the integrated Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signal, $Y_{\rm SZ}$, its X-ray analogue, $Y_{\rm X}\equiv M_{\rm gas}T_{\rm X}$, and total mass, $M_{\rm tot}$, for the 45 galaxy clusters in the Bolocam X-ray-SZ (BOXSZ) sample. All parameters are integrated within $r_{2500}$. $Y_{2500}$ values are measured using SZE data collected with Bolocam, operating at 140 GHz at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). The temperature, $T_{\rm X}$, and mass, $M_{\rm gas,2500}$, of the intracluster medium are determined using X-ray data collected with Chandra, and $M_{\rm tot}$ is derived from $M_{\rm gas}$ assuming a constant gas mass fraction. Our analysis accounts for several potential sources of bias, including: selection effects, contamination from radio point sources, and the loss of SZE signal due to noise filtering and beam-smoothing effects. We measure the $Y_{2500}$--$Y_{\rm X}$ scaling to have a power-law index of $0.84\pm0.07$, and a fractional intrinsic scatter in $Y_{2500}$ of $(21\pm7)\%$ at fixed $Y_{\rm X}$, both of which are consistent with previous analyses. We also measure the scaling between $Y_{2500}$ and $M_{2500}$, finding a power-law index of $1.06\pm0.12$ and a fractional intrinsic scatter in $Y_{2500}$ at fixed mass of $(25\pm9)\%$. While recent SZE scaling relations using X-ray mass proxies have found power-law indices consistent with the self-similar prediction of 5/3, our measurement stands apart by differing from the self-similar prediction by approximately 5$\sigma$. Given the good agreement between the measured $Y_{2500}$--$Y_{\rm X}$ scalings, much of this discrepancy appears to be caused by differences in the calibration of the X-ray mass proxies adopted for each particular analysis.
  • Observations of non-thermal emission from several supernova remnants suggest that magnetic fields close to the blastwave are much stronger than would be naively expected from simple shock compression of the field permeating the interstellar medium (ISM). We investigate in some detail a simple model based on turbulence generation by cosmic-ray pressure gradients. Previously this model was investigated using 2D MHD simulations. Motivated by the well-known qualitative differences between 2D and 3D turbulence, we further our investigations of this model using both 2D and 3D simulations to study the influence of the dimensionality of the simulations on the field amplification achieved. Further, since the model implies the formation of shocks which can, in principle, be efficiently cooled by collisional cooling we include such cooling in our simulations to ascertain whether it could increase the field amplification achieved. Finally, we examine the influence of different orientations of the magnetic field with respect to the normal of the blastwave. We find that dimensionality has a slight influence on the overall amplification achieved, but a significant impact on the morphology of the amplified field. Collisional cooling has surprisingly little impact, primarily due to the short time which any element of the ISM resides in the precursor region for supernova blastwaves. Even allowing for a wide range of orientations of the magnetic field, we find that the magnetic field can be expected to be amplified by, on average, at least an order of magnitude in the precursors of supernova blastwaves.
  • We present a study of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a weakly ionised, multifluid MHD plasma with parameters matching those of a typical molecular cloud. The instability is capable of transforming well-ordered flows into disordered flows. As a result, it may be able to convert the energy found in, for example, bowshocks from stellar jets into the turbulent energy found in molecular clouds. As these clouds are weakly ionised, the ideal magnetohydrodynamic approximation does not apply at scales of around a tenth of a parsec or less. This paper extends the work of Jones & Downes (2011) on the evolution of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the presence of multifluid magnetohydrodynamic effects. These effects of ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect are here studied together under physical parameters applicable to molecular clouds. We restrict our attention to the case of a single shear layer with a transonic, but super-Alfvenic, velocity jump and the computational domain is chosen to match the wavelength of the linearly fastest growing mode of the instability. We find that while the introduction of multifluid effects does not affect the linear growth rates of the instability, the non-linear behaviour undergoes considerable change. The magnetic field is decoupled from the bulk flow as a result of the ambipolar diffusion, which leads to a significant difference in the evolution of the field. The Hall effect would be expected to lead to a noticeable re-orientation of the magnetic field lines perpendicular to the plane. However, the results reveal that the combination with ambipolar diffusion leads to a surprisingly effective suppression of this effect.
  • We present a 0.72 sq. deg. contiguous 1.1mm survey in the central area of the COSMOS field carried out to a 1sigma ~ 1.26 mJy/beam depth with the AzTEC camera mounted on the 10m Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). We have uncovered 189 candidate sources at a signal-to-noise ratio S/N >= 3.5, out of which 129, with S/N >= 4, can be considered to have little chance of being spurious (< 2 per cent). We present the number counts derived with this survey, which show a significant excess of sources when compared to the number counts derived from the ~0.5 sq. deg. area sampled at similar depths in the Scuba HAlf Degree Extragalactic Survey (SHADES, Austermann et al. 2010). They are, however, consistent with those derived from fields that were considered too small to characterize the overall blank-field population. We identify differences to be more significant in the S > 5 mJy regime, and demonstrate that these excesses in number counts are related to the areas where galaxies at redshifts z < 1.1 are more densely clustered. The positions of optical-IR galaxies in the redshift interval 0.6 < z < 0.75 are the ones that show the strongest correlation with the positions of the 1.1mm bright population (S > 5 mJy), a result which does not depend exclusively on the presence of rich clusters within the survey sampled area. The most likely explanation for the observed excess in number counts at 1.1mm is galaxy-galaxy and galaxy-group lensing at moderate amplification levels, that increases in amplitude as one samples larger and larger flux densities. This effect should also be detectable in other high redshift populations.
  • It is well known that non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects are important in the dynamics of molecular clouds: both ambipolar diffusion and possibly the Hall effect have been identified as significant. We present the results of a suite of simulations with a resolution of 512-cubed of turbulent decay in molecular clouds incorporating a simplified form of both ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect simultaneously. The initial velocity field in the turbulence is varied from being super-Alfv\'enic and hypersonic, through to trans-Alfv\'enic but still supersonic. We find that ambipolar diffusion increases the rate of decay of the turbulence increasing the decay from $t^{-1.25}$ to $t^{-1.4}$. The Hall effect has virtually no impact in this regard. The power spectra of density, velocity and the magnetic field are all affected by the non-ideal terms, being steepened significantly when compared with ideal MHD turbulence with exponents. The density power spectra components change from about 1.4 to about 2.1 for the ideal and non-ideal simulations respectively, and power spectra of the other variables all show similar modifications when non-ideal effects are considered. Again, the dominant source of these changes is ambipolar diffusion rather than the Hall effect. There is also a decoupling between the velocity field and the magnetic field at short length scales. The Hall effect leads to enhanced magnetic reconnection, and hence less power, at short length scales. The dependence of the velocity dispersion on the characteristic length scale is studied and found not to be power-law in nature.
  • Astrophysical fluids under the influence of magnetic fields are often subjected to single-fluid or two-fluid approximations. In the case of weakly ionized plasmas however, this can be inappropriate due to distinct responses from the multiple constituent species to both collisional and non-collisional forces. As a result, in dense molecular clouds and proto-stellar accretion discs for instance, the conductivity of the plasma may be highly anisotropic leading to phenomena such as Hall and ambipolar diffusion strongly influencing the dynamics. Diffusive processes are known to restrict the stability of conventional numerical schemes which are not implicit in nature. Furthermore, recent work establishes that a large Hall term can impose an additional severe stability limit on standard explicit schemes. Following a previous paper which presented the one-dimensional case, we describe a fully three-dimensional method which relaxes the normal restrictions on explicit schemes for multifluid processes. This is achieved by applying the little known Super TimeStepping technique to the symmetric (ambipolar) component of the evolution operator for the magnetic field in the local plasma rest-frame, and the new Hall Diffusion Scheme to the skew-symmetric (Hall) component.