• We present new observations of 34 YSO candidates in the SMC. The anchor of the analysis is a set of Spitzer-IRS spectra, supplemented by groundbased 3-5 micron spectra, Spitzer and NIR photometry, optical spectroscopy and radio data. The sources' SEDs and spectral indices are consistent with embedded YSOs; prominent silicate absorption is observed in the spectra of at least ten sources, silicate emission is observed towards four sources. PAH emission is detected towards all but two sources. Based on band ratios (in particular the strength of the 11.3 micron and the weakness of the 8.6 micron bands) PAH emission towards SMC YSOs is dominated by predominantly small neutral grains. Ice absorption is observed towards fourteen sources in the SMC. The comparison of H2O and CO2 ice column densities for SMC, LMC and Galactic samples suggests that there is a significant H2O column density threshold for the detection of CO2 ice. This supports the scenario proposed by Oliveira et al. (2011), where the reduced shielding in metal-poor environments depletes the H2O column density in the outer regions of the YSO envelopes. No CO ice is detected towards the SMC sources. Emission due to pure-rotational 0-0 transitions of H2 is detected towards the majority of SMC sources, allowing us to estimate rotational temperatures and column densities. All but one source are spectroscopically confirmed as SMC YSOs. Of the 33 YSOs identified in the SMC, 30 sources populate different stages of massive stellar evolution. The remaining three sources are classified as intermediate-mass YSOs with a thick dusty disc and a tenuous envelope still present. We propose one of the sources is a D-type symbiotic system, based on the presence of Raman, H and He emission lines in the optical spectrum, and silicate emission in the IRS-spectrum. This would be the first dust-rich symbiotic system identified in the SMC. (abridged)
  • Context: The Red MSX Source (RMS) survey is returning a large sample of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and ultra-compact (UC) \HII{} regions using follow-up observations of colour-selected candidates from the MSX point source catalogue. Aims: To obtain the bolometric fluxes and, using kinematic distance information, the luminosities for young RMS sources with far-infrared fluxes. Methods: We use a model spectral energy distribution (SED) fitter to obtain the bolometric flux for our sources, given flux data from our work and the literature. The inputs to the model fitter were optimised by a series of investigations designed to reveal the effect varying these inputs had on the resulting bolometric flux. Kinematic distances derived from molecular line observations were then used to calculate the luminosity of each source. Results: Bolometric fluxes are obtained for 1173 young RMS sources, of which 1069 have uniquely constrained kinematic distances and good SED fits. A comparison of the bolometric fluxes obtained using SED fitting with trapezium rule integration and two component greybody fits was also undertaken, and showed that both produce considerable scatter compared to the method used here. Conclusions: The bolometric flux results allowed us to obtain the luminosity distributions of YSOs and UC\HII{} regions in the RMS sample, which we find to be different. We also find that there are few MYSOs with L $\geq$ 10$^{5}$\lsol{}, despite finding many MYSOs with 10$^{4}$\lsol{} $\geq$ L $\geq$ 10$^{5}$\lsol{}.
  • We present a catalog of 5324 massive stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), with accurate spectral types compiled from the literature, and a photometric catalog for a subset of 3654 of these stars, with the goal of exploring their infrared properties. The photometric catalog consists of stars with infrared counterparts in the Spitzer, SAGE-SMC survey database, for which we present uniform photometry from 0.3-24 um in the UBVIJHKs+IRAC+MIPS24 bands. We compare the color magnitude diagrams and color-color diagrams to those of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), finding that the brightest infrared sources in the SMC are also the red supergiants, supergiant B[e] (sgB[e]) stars, luminous blue variables, and Wolf-Rayet stars, with the latter exhibiting less infrared excess, the red supergiants being less dusty and the sgB[e] stars being on average less luminous. Among the objects detected at 24 um are a few very luminous hypergiants, 4 B-type stars with peculiar, flat spectral energy distributions, and all 3 known luminous blue variables. We detect a distinct Be star sequence, displaced to the red, and suggest a novel method of confirming Be star candidates photometrically. We find a higher fraction of Oe and Be stars among O and early-B stars in the SMC, respectively, when compared to the LMC, and that the SMC Be stars occur at higher luminosities. We estimate mass-loss rates for the red supergiants, confirming the correlation with luminosity even at the metallicity of the SMC. Finally, we confirm the new class of stars displaying composite A & F type spectra, the sgB[e] nature of 2dFS1804 and find the F0 supergiant 2dFS3528 to be a candidate luminous blue variable with cold dust.
  • It has been shown that by means of different physical mechanisms the expansion of HII regions can trigger the formation of new stars of all masses. This process may be important to the formation of massive stars but has never been quantified in the Galaxy. We use Herschel-PACS and -SPIRE images from the Herschel Infrared survey of the Galactic plane, Hi-GAL, to perform this study. We combine the Spitzer-GLIMPSE and -MIPSGAL, radio-continuum and sub-millimeter surveys such as ATLASGAL with Hi-GAL to study Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) observed towards Galactic HII regions. We select a representative HII region, N49, located in the field centered on l=30 degr observed as part of the Hi-GAL Science Demonstration Phase, to demonstrate the importance Hi-GAL will have to this field of research. Hi-GAL PACS and SPIRE images reveal a new population of embedded young stars, coincident with bright ATLASGAL condensations. The Hi-GAL images also allow us, for the first time, to constrain the physical properties of the newly formed stars by means of fits to their spectral energy distribution. Massive young stellar objects are observed at the borders of the N49 region and represent second generation massive stars whose formation has been triggered by the expansion of the ionized region. Hi-GAL enables us to detect a population of young stars at different evolutionary stages, cold condensations only being detected in the SPIRE wavelength range. The far IR coverage of Hi-GAL strongly constrains the physical properties of the YSOs. The large and unbiased spatial coverage of this survey offers us a unique opportunity to lead, for the first time, a global study of star formation triggered by HII regions in our Galaxy.
  • Using images from the Spitzer GLIMPSE Legacy survey, we have identified more than 300 extended 4.5 micron sources (abbreviated EGO, Extended Green Object, for the common coding of the [4.5] band as green in 3-color composite IRAC images). We present a catalog of these EGOs, including integrated flux density measurements at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, and 24 microns from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys. The average angular separation between a source in our sample and the nearest IRAS point source is >1 arcminute. The majority of EGOs are associated with infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), and where high-resolution 6.7 GHz methanol maser surveys overlap the GLIMPSE coverage, EGOs and 6.7 GHz methanol masers are strongly correlated. Extended 4.5 micron emission is thought to trace shocked molecular gas in protostellar outflows; the association of EGOs with IRDCs and 6.7 GHz methanol masers suggests that extended 4.5 micron emission may pinpoint outflows specifically from massive protostars. The mid-infrared colors of EGOs lie in regions of color-color space occupied by young protostars still embedded in infalling envelopes.
  • We present an analysis of wind-blown, parsec-sized, mid-infrared bubbles and associated star-formation using GLIMPSE/IRAC, MIPSGAL/MIPS and MAGPIS/VLA surveys. Three bubbles from the Churchwell et al. (2006) catalog were selected. The relative distribution of the ionized gas (based on 20 cm emission), PAH emission (based on 8 um, 5.8 um and lack of 4.5 um emission) and hot dust (24 um emission) are compared. At the center of each bubble there is a region containing ionized gas and hot dust, surrounded by PAHs. We identify the likely source(s) of the stellar wind and ionizing flux producing each bubble based upon SED fitting to numerical hot stellar photosphere models. Candidate YSOs are also identified using SED fitting, including several sites of possible triggered star formation.