• The manner in which gas accretes and orbits within circumnuclear rings has direct implications for the star formation process. In particular, gas may be compressed and shocked at the inflow points, resulting in bursts of star formation at these locations. Afterwards the gas and young stars move together through the ring. In addition, star formation may occur throughout the ring, if and when the gas reaches sufficient density to collapse under gravity. These two scenarios for star formation in rings are often referred to as the `pearls on a string' and `popcorn' paradigms. In this paper, we use new Herschel PACS observations, obtained as part of the KINGFISH Open Time Key Program, along with archival Spitzer and ground-based observations from the SINGS Legacy project, to investigate the heating and cooling of the interstellar medium in the nearby star-forming ring galaxy, NGC4736. By comparing spatially resolved estimates of the stellar FUV flux available for heating, with the gas and dust cooling derived from the FIR continuum and line emission, we show that while star formation is indeed dominant at the inflow points in NGC 4736, additional star formation is needed to balance the gas heating and cooling throughout the ring. This additional component most likely arises from the general increase in gas density in the ring over its lifetime. Our data provide strong evidence, therefore, for a combination of the two paradigms for star formation in the ring in NGC4736.
  • The excitation of the gas phase of the interstellar medium can be driven by various mechanisms. In galaxies with an active nucleus, such as Seyfert galaxies, both radiative and mechanical energy from the central black hole, or the stars in the disk surrounding it may play a role. We investigate the relative importance and range of influence of the active galactic nucleus for the excitation of ionized and molecular gas in the central kiloparsec of its host galaxy. We present H- and K-band long-slit spectra for a sample of 21 nearby (D <70 Mpc) Seyfert galaxies obtained with the NIRSPEC instrument on the Keck telescope. For each galaxy, we fit the nebular line emission, stellar continua, and warm molecular gas as a function of distance from the nucleus. Our analysis does not reveal a clear difference between the nucleus proper and off-nuclear environment in terms of excitation mechanisms, suggesting that the influence of an AGN reaches far into the disk of the host galaxy. The radial variations in emission line ratios indicate that, while local mechanisms do affect the gas excitation, they are often averaged out when measuring over extended regions. The fully calibrated long-slit spectra, as well as our fitting results, are made available on-line.
  • The distribution of gas in the central kiloparsec of a galaxy has a dynamically rapid evolution. Nonaxisymmetries in the gravitational potential of the galactic disk, such as a large scale stellar bar or spiral, can lead to significant radial motion of gaseous material from larger radii to the central region. The large influx of gas and the subsequent star formation keep the central region constantly changing. However, the ability of gas to reach the nucleus proper to fuel an AGN phase is not guaranteed. Gas inflow can be halted at a circumnuclear star forming ring several hundred parsec away. The nearby galaxy NGC5248 is especially interesting in this sense since it is said to host 2 circumnuclear star forming rings at 100pc and 370pc from its quiescent nucleus. Here we present new subarcsecond PdBI+30m CO(2-1) emission line observations of the central region. For the first time the molecular gas distribution at the smallest stellar ring is resolved into a gas ring, consistent with the presence of a quiescent nucleus. However, the molecular gas shows no ring structure at the larger ring. We combine analyses of the gaseous and stellar content in the central kiloparsec of this galaxy to understand the gas distribution and dynamics of this star forming central region. We discuss the probability of two scenarios leading to the current observations, given our full understanding of this system, and discuss whether there are really two circumnuclear star forming rings in this galaxy.
  • Gas inflowing along stellar bars is often stalled at the location of circumnuclear rings, that form an effective reservoir for massive star formation and thus shape the central regions of galaxies. However, how exactly star formation is proceeding within these circumnuclear starburst rings is subject of debate. Two main scenarios for this process have been put forward: In the first the onset of star formation is regulated by the total amount of gas present in the ring with star forming starting once a mass threshold has reached in a `random' position within the ring like `popcorn'. In the second star formation preferentially takes place near the locations where the gas enters the ring. This scenario has been dubbed `pearls-on-a-string'. Here we combine new optical IFU data covering the full stellar bar with existing multi-wavelength data to study in detail the 580 pc radius circumnuclear starburst ring in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 6951. Using HST archival data together with Sauron and Oasis IFU data, we derive the ages and stellar masses of star clusters as well as the total stellar content of the central region. Adding information on the molecular gas distribution, stellar and gaseous dynamics and extinction, we find that the circumnuclear ring in NGC 6951 is ~1-1.5 Gyr old and has been forming stars for most of that time. We see evidence for preferred sites of star formation within the ring, consistent with the `pearls-on-a-string' scenario, when focusing on the youngest stellar populations. Due to the ring's longevity this signature is washed out when older stellar populations are included in the analysis.
  • Within the NUclei of GAlaxies project we have obtained IRAM PdBI and 30m 12CO(1-0) and 12CO(2-1) observations of the spiral galaxy NGC 6951. Previous work shows that there is indirect evidence of gas inflow from 3 kpc down to small radii: a large-scale stellar bar, a prominent starburst ring (r~580 pc) and a LINER/Seyfert 2 nucleus. In this paper we study the gas kinematics as traced by the CO line emission in detail. We quantify the influence of the large-scale stellar bar by constructing an analytical model of the evolution of gas particles in a barred potential. From this model gravitational torques and mass accumulation rates are computed. We compare our model-based gravitational torque results with previous observationally-based ones. The model also shows that the large-scale stellar bar is indeed the dominant force for driving the gas inward, to the starburst ring. Inside the ring itself a nuclear stellar oval might play an important role. Detailed analysis of the CO gas kinematics there shows that emission arises from two co-spatial, but kinematically distinct components at several locations. The main emission component can always be related to the overall bar-driven gas kinematics. The second component exhibits velocities that are larger than expected for gas on stable orbits, has a molecular gas mass of 1.8x10^6Msun, is very likely connected to the nuclear stellar oval, and is consistent with inflowing motion towards the very center. This may form the last link in the chain of gas inflow towards the active galactic nucleus in NGC 6951.