• Chemically peculiar stars in dwarf galaxies provide a window for exploring the birth environment of stars with varying chemical enrichment. We present a chemical abundance analysis of the brightest star in the newly discovered ultra-faint dwarf galaxy candidate Tucana III. Because it is particularly bright for a star in an ultra-faint Milky Way satellite, we are able to measure the abundance of 28 elements, including 13 neutron-capture species. This star, DES J235532.66$-$593114.9 (DES J235532), shows a mild enhancement in neutron-capture elements associated with the $r$-process and can be classified as an $r$-I star. DES J235532 is the first $r$-I star to be discovered in an ultra-faint satellite, and Tuc III is the second extremely low-luminosity system found to contain $r$-process enriched material, after Reticulum II. Comparison of the abundance pattern of DES J235532 with $r$-I and $r$-II stars found in other dwarf galaxies and in the Milky Way halo suggests a common astrophysical origin for the neutron-capture elements seen in all $r$-process enhanced stars. We explore both internal and external scenarios for the $r$-process enrichment of Tuc III and show that with abundance patterns for additional stars it should be possible to distinguish between them.
  • Detailed spectroscopic studies of metal-poor halo stars have highlighted the important role of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in understanding the early production and ejection of carbon in the Galaxy and in identifying the progenitors of the CEMP stars among the first stars formed after the Big Bang. Recent work has also classified the CEMP stars by absolute carbon abundance, A(C), into high- and low-C bands, mostly populated by binary and single stars, respectively. Our aim is to determine the frequency and orbital parameters of binary systems among the CEMP-s stars, which exhibit strong enhancements of neutron-capture elements associated with the s-process. This allows us to test whether local mass transfer from a binary companion is necessary and sufficient to explain their dramatic carbon excesses. Eighteen of the 22 stars exhibit clear orbital motion, yielding a binary frequency of 82+-10%, while four stars appear to be single (18+-10%). We thus confirm that the binary frequency of CEMP-s stars is much higher than for normal metal-poor giants, but not 100% as previously claimed. Secure orbits are determined for 11 of the binaries and provisional orbits for six long-period systems (P > 3,000 days), and orbital circularisation time scales are discussed. The conventional scenario of local mass transfer from a former AGB binary companion does appear to account for the chemical composition of most CEMP-s stars. However, the excess of C and s-process elements in some single CEMP-s stars was apparently transferred to their natal clouds by an external (distant) source. This finding has important implications for our understanding of carbon enrichment in the early Galactic halo and some high-redshift DLA systems, and of the mass loss from extremely metal-poor AGB stars. Abridged.
  • An increasing fraction of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars is found as their iron abundance, [Fe/H], decreases below [Fe/H] = -2.0. The CEMP-s stars have the highest absolute carbon abundances, [C/H], and are thought to owe their enrichment in carbon and the slow neutron-capture (s-process) elements to mass transfer from a former asymptotic giant-branch (AGB) binary companion. The most Fe-poor CEMP stars are normally single, exhibit somewhat lower [C/H] than CEMP-s stars, but show no s-process element enhancement (CEMP-no stars). CNO abundance determinations offer clues to their formation sites. C, N, Sr, and Ba abundances (or limits) and 12C/13C ratios where possible are derived for a sample of 27 faint metal-poor stars for which the X-shooter spectra have sufficient S/N ratios. These moderate resolution, low S/N (~10-40) spectra prove sufficient to perform limited chemical tagging and enable assignment of these stars into the CEMP sub-classes (CEMP-s and CEMP-no). According to the derived abundances, 17 of our sample stars are CEMP-s and three are CEMP-no, while the remaining seven are carbon-normal. For four CEMP stars, the sub-classification remains uncertain, and two of them may be pulsating AGB stars. The derived stellar abundances trace the formation processes and sites of our sample stars. The [C/N] abundance ratio is useful to identify stars with chemical compositions unaffected by internal mixing, and the [Sr/Ba] abundance ratio allows us to distinguish between CEMP-s stars with AGB progenitors and the CEMP-no stars. Suggested formation sites for the latter include faint supernovae with mixing and fallback and/or primordial, rapidly-rotating, massive stars (spinstars). X-shooter spectra have thus proved to be valuable tools in the continued search for their origin. Abridged.