• We present the result of searching for clusters of galaxies based on weak gravitational lensing analysis of the $\sim 160$~deg$^2$ area surveyed by Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) as a Subaru Strategic Program. HSC is a new prime focus optical imager with a 1.5 diameter field of view on the 8.2-meter Subaru telescope. The superb median seeing on the HSC $i$-band images of $0.56$ arcsec allows the reconstruction of high angular resolution mass maps via weak lensing, which is crucial for the weak lensing cluster search. We identify 65 mass map peaks with signal-to-noise (SN) ratio larger than 4.7, and carefully examine their properties by cross-matching the clusters with optical and X-ray cluster catalogs. We find that all the 39 peaks with SN$>5.1$ have counterparts in the optical cluster catalogs, and only 2 out of the 65 peaks are probably false positives. The upper limits of X-ray luminosities from ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS) imply the existence of an X-ray under-luminous cluster population. We show that the X-rays from the shear selected clusters can be statistically detected by stacking the RASS images. The inferred average X-ray luminosity is about half that of the X-ray selected clusters of the same mass. The radial profile of the dark matter distribution derived from the stacking analysis is well modeled by the Navarro-Frenk-White profile with a small concentration parameter value of $c_{500}\sim 2.5$, which suggests that the selection bias on the orientation or the internal structure for our shear selected cluster sample is not strong.
  • We present the first results of a pilot X-ray study of 17 rich galaxy clusters at $0.14<z<0.75$ in the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP) field. Diffuse X-ray emissions from these clusters were serendipitously detected in the XMM-Newton fields of view. We systematically analyze X-ray images and emission spectra of the hot intracluster gas by using the XMM-Newton archive data. The frequency distribution of the offset between the X-ray centroid or peak and the position of the brightest cluster galaxy was derived for the optically-selected cluster sample. The fraction of relaxed clusters estimated from the X-ray peak offsets is $30\pm13$%, which is smaller than that of the X-ray cluster samples such as HIFLUGCS. Since the optical cluster search is immune to the physical state of X-ray-emitting gas, it is likely to cover a larger range of the cluster morphology. We also derived the luminosity-temperature relation and found that the slope is marginally shallower than those of X-ray-selected samples and consistent with the self-similar model prediction of 2. Accordingly, our results show that the X-ray properties of the optically-selected clusters are marginally different from those observed in the X-ray samples. The implication of the results and future prospects are briefly discussed.
  • We present and characterize the catalog of galaxy shape measurements that will be used for cosmological weak lensing measurements in the Wide layer of the first year of the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey. The catalog covers an area of 136.9 deg$^2$ split into six fields, with a mean $i$-band seeing of $0.58$ arcsec and $5\sigma$ point-source depth of $i\sim 26$. Given conservative galaxy selection criteria for first year science, the depth and excellent image quality results in unweighted and weighted source number densities of 24.6 and 21.8 arcmin$^{-2}$, respectively. We define the requirements for cosmological weak lensing science with this catalog, then focus on characterizing potential systematics in the catalog using a series of internal null tests for problems with point-spread function (PSF) modeling, shear estimation, and other aspects of the image processing. We find that the PSF models narrowly meet requirements for weak lensing science with this catalog, with fractional PSF model size residuals of approximately $0.003$ (requirement: 0.004) and the PSF model shape correlation function $\rho_1<3\times 10^{-7}$ (requirement: $4\times 10^{-7}$) at 0.5$^\circ$ scales. A variety of galaxy shape-related null tests are statistically consistent with zero, but star-galaxy shape correlations reveal additive systematics on $>1^\circ$ scales that are sufficiently large as to require mitigation in cosmic shear measurements. Finally, we discuss the dominant systematics and the planned algorithmic changes to reduce them in future data reductions.
  • We present a joint X-ray, optical and weak-lensing analysis for X-ray luminous galaxy clusters selected from the MCXC (Meta-Catalog of X-Ray Detected Clusters of Galaxies) cluster catalog in the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP) survey field with S16A data, As a pilot study of our planned series papers, we measure hydrostatic equilibrium (H.E.) masses using XMM-Newton data for four clusters in the current coverage area out of a sample of 22 MCXC clusters. We additionally analyze a non-MCXC cluster associated with one MCXC cluster. We show that H.E. masses for the MCXC clusters are correlated with cluster richness from the CAMIRA catalog (Oguri et al. 2017), while that for the non-MCXC cluster deviates from the scaling relation. The mass normalization of the relationship between the cluster richness and H.E. mass is compatible with one inferred by matching CAMIRA cluster abundance with a theoretical halo mass function. The mean gas mass fraction based on H.E. masses for the MCXC clusters is $\langle f_{\rm gas} \rangle = 0.125\pm0.012$ at spherical overdensity $\Delta=500$, which is $\sim80-90$ percent of the cosmic mean baryon fraction, $\Omega_b/\Omega_m$, measured by cosmic microwave background experiments. We find that the mean baryon fraction estimated from X-ray and HSC-SSP optical data is comparable to $\Omega_b/\Omega_m$. A weak-lensing shear catalog of background galaxies, combined with photometric redshifts, is currently available only for three clusters in our sample. Hydrostatic equilibrium masses roughly agree with weak-lensing masses, albeit with large uncertainty. This study demonstrates that further multiwavelength study for a large sample of clusters using X-ray, HSC-SSP optical and weak lensing data will enable us to understand cluster physics and utilize cluster-based cosmology.
  • We present 108 full-sky gravitational lensing simulation datasets generated by performing multiple-lens plane ray-tracing through high-resolution cosmological $N$-body simulations. The datasets include full-sky convergence and shear maps from redshifts $z=0.05$ to $5.3$ at intervals of $150 \, h^{-1}{\rm Mpc}$ comoving radial distance (corresponding to a redshift interval of $\Delta z \simeq 0.05$ at the nearby Universe), enabling the construction of a mock shear catalog for an arbitrary source distribution up to $z=5.3$. The dark matter halos are identified from the same $N$-body simulations with enough mass resolution to resolve the host halos of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) CMASS and Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs). Angular positions and redshifts of the halos are provided by a ray-tracing calculation, enabling the creation of a mock halo catalog to be used for galaxy-galaxy and cluster-galaxy lensing. The simulation also yields maps of gravitational lensing deflections for a source redshift at the last scattering surface, and we provide 108 realizations of lensed cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps in which the post-Born corrections caused by multiple light scattering are included. We present basic statistics of the simulation data, including the angular power spectra of cosmic shear, CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies, galaxy-galaxy lensing signals for halos, and their covariances. The angular power spectra of the cosmic shear and CMB anisotropies agree with theoretical predictions within $5\%$ up to $\ell = 3000$ (or at an angular scale $\theta > 0.5$ arcsin). The simulation datasets are generated primarily for the ongoing Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam survey but are freely available for download at http://cosmo.phys.hirosaki-u.ac.jp/takahasi/allsky_raytracing.
  • We develop a method to simulate galaxy-galaxy weak lensing by utilizing all-sky, light-cone simulations and their inherent halo catalogs. Using the mock catalog to study the error covariance matrix of galaxy-galaxy weak lensing, we compare the full covariance with the "jackknife" (JK) covariance, the method often used in the literature that estimates the covariance from the resamples of the data itself. We show that there exists the variation of JK covariance over realizations of mock lensing measurements, while the average JK covariance over mocks can give a reasonably accurate estimation of the true covariance up to separations comparable with the size of JK subregion. The scatter in JK covariances is found to be $\sim10\%$ after we subtract the lensing measurement around random points. However, the JK method tends to underestimate the covariance at the larger separations, more increasingly for a survey with a higher number density of source galaxies. We apply our method to the the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data, and show that the 48 mock SDSS catalogs nicely reproduce the signals and the JK covariance measured from the real data. We then argue that the use of the accurate covariance, compared to the JK covariance, allows us to use the lensing signals at large scales beyond a size of the JK subregion, which contains cleaner cosmological information in the linear regime.
  • We present the results of clustering analyses of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at $z\sim3$, $4$, and $5$ using the final data release of the Canada--France--Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). Deep- and wide-field images of the CFHTLS Deep Survey enable us to obtain sufficiently accurate two-point angular correlation functions to apply a halo occupation distribution analysis. Mean halo masses, calculated as $\langle M_{h} \rangle=10^{11.7}-10^{12.8}h^{-1}M_{\odot}$, increase with stellar-mass limit of LBGs. The threshold halo mass to have a central galaxy follows the same increasing trend with the low-$z$ results, whereas the threshold halo mass to have a satellite galaxy shows higher values at $z=3-5$ than $z=0.5-1.5$ over the entire stellar mass range. Satellite fractions of dropout galaxies, even at less massive haloes, are found to drop sharply from $z=2$ down to less than $0.04$ at $z=3-5$. These results suggest that satellite galaxies form inefficiently within dark haloes at $z=3-5$ even for less massive satellites with $M_{\star}<10^{10}M_{\odot}$. We compute stellar-to-halo mass ratios (SHMRs) assuming a main sequence of galaxies, which is found to provide consistent SHMRs with those derived from a spectral energy distribution fitting method. The observed SHMRs are in good agreement with the model predictions based on the abundance-matching method within $1\sigma$ confidence intervals. We derive observationally, for the first time, $M_{{\rm h}}^{{\rm pivot}}$, which is the halo mass at a peak in the star-formation efficiency, at $3<z<5$, and it shows a little increasing trend with cosmic time at $z>3$. In addition, $M_{{\rm h}}^{{\rm pivot}}$ and its normalization are found to be almost unchanged during $0<z<5$. Our study shows an observational evidence that galaxy formation is ubiquitously most efficient near a halo mass of $M_{{\rm h}}\sim10^{12}M_{\odot}$ over cosmic time.
  • We present the results of an halo occupation distribution (HOD) analysis of star-forming galaxies at $z \sim 2$. We obtained high-quality angular correlation functions based on a large sgzK sample, which enabled us to carry out the HOD analysis. The mean halo mass and the HOD mass parameters are found to increase monotonically with increasing $K$-band magnitude, suggesting that more luminous galaxies reside in more massive dark haloes. The luminosity dependence of the HOD mass parameters was found to be the same as in the local Universe; however, the masses were larger than in the local Universe over all ranges of magnitude. This implies that galaxies at $z \sim 2$ tend to form in more massive dark haloes than in the local Universe, a process known as downsizing. By analysing the dark halo mass evolution using the extended Press--Schechter formalism and the number evolution of satellite galaxies in a dark halo, we find that faint Lyman break galaxies at $z \sim 4$ could evolve into the faintest sgzKs $(22.0 < K \leq 23.0)$ at $z \sim 2$ and into the Milky-Way-like galaxies or elliptical galaxies in the local Universe, whereas the most luminous sgzKs $(18.0 \leq K \leq 21.0)$ could evolve into the most massive systems in the local Universe. The stellar-to-halo mass ratio (SHMR) of the sgzKs was found to be consistent with the prediction of the model, except that the SHMR of the faintest sgzKs was smaller than the prediction at $z \sim 2$. This discrepancy may be attributed that our samples are confined to star-forming galaxies.
  • Ongoing and future wide-field galaxy surveys can be used to locate a number of clusters of galaxies with cosmic shear measurement alone. We study constraints on cosmological models using statistics of weak lensing selected galaxy clusters. We extend our previous theoretical framework to model the statistical properties of clusters in variants of cosmological models as well as in the standard $\Lambda$CDM model. Weak lensing selection of clusters does not rely on the conventional assumption such as the relation between luminosity and mass and/or hydrostatic equilibrium, but a number of observational effects compromise robust identification. We use a large set of realistic mock weak-lensing catalogs as well as analytic models to perform a Fisher analysis and make forecast for constraining two competing cosmological models, $w$CDM model and $f(R)$ model proposed by Hu & Sawicki, with our lensing statistics. We show that weak lensing selected clusters are excellent probe of cosmology when combined with cosmic shear power spectrum even in presence of galaxy shape noise and masked regions. With the information of weak lensing selected clusters, the precision of cosmological parameter estimate can be improved by a factor of $\sim1.6$ and $\sim8$ for $w$CDM model and $f(R)$ model, respectively. Hyper Suprime-Cam survey with sky coverage of $1250$ squared degrees can constrain the equation of state of dark energy $w_{0}$ with a level of $\Delta w_0 \sim0.1$. It can also constrain the additional scalar degree of freedom in $f(R)$ model with a level of $|f_{R0}| \sim5\times10^{-6}$, when constraints from cosmic microwave background measurements are incorporated. Future weak lensing surveys with sky coverage of $20,000$ squared degrees will place tighter constraints on $w_{0}$ and $|f_{R0}|$ even without cosmic microwave background measurements.
  • We explore a variety of statistics of clusters selected with cosmic shear measurement by utilizing both analytic models and large numerical simulations. We first develop a halo model to predict the abundance and the clustering of weak lensing selected clusters. Observational effects such as galaxy shape noise are included in our model. We then generate realistic mock weak lensing catalogs to test the accuracy of our analytic model. To this end, we perform full-sky ray-tracing simulations that allow us to have multiple realizations of a large continuous area. We model the masked regions on the sky using the actual positions of bright stars, and generate 200 mock weak lensing catalogs with sky coverage of ~1000 squared degrees. We show that our theoretical model agrees well with the ensemble average of statistics and their covariances calculated directly from the mock catalogues. With a typical selection threshold, ignoring shape noise correction causes overestimation of the clustering of weak lensing selected clusters with a level of about 10%, and shape noise correction boosts the cluster abundance by a factor of a few. We calculate the cross-covariances using the halo model with accounting for the effective reduction of the survey area due to masks. The covariance of the cosmic shear auto power spectrum is affected by the mode-coupling effect that originates from sky masking. Our model and the results can be readily used for cosmological analysis with ongoing and future weak lensing surveys.
  • We present properties of moderately massive clusters of galaxies detected by the newly developed Hyper Suprime-Cam on the Subaru telescope using weak gravitational lensing. Eight peaks exceeding a S/N ratio of 4.5 are identified on the convergence S/N map of a 2.3 square degree field observed during the early commissioning phase of the camera. Multi-color photometric data is used to generate optically selected clusters using the CAMIRA algorithm. The optical cluster positions were correlated with the peak positions from the convergence map. All eight significant peaks have optical counterparts. The velocity dispersion of clusters are evaluated by adopting the Singular Isothemal Sphere (SIS) fit to the tangential shear profiles, yielding virial mass estimates, M500c, of the clusters which range from 2.7x10^13 to 4.4x10^14 solar mass. The number of peaks is considerably larger than the average number expected from LambdaCDM cosmology but this is not extremely unlikely if one takes the large sample variance in the small field into account. We could, however, safely argue that the peak count strongly favours the recent Planck result suggesting high sigma8$value of 0.83. The ratio of stellar mass to the dark matter halo mass shows a clear decline as the halo mass increases. If the gas mass fraction, fg, in halos is universal, as has been suggested in the literature, the observed baryon mass in stars and gas shows a possible deficit compared with the total baryon density estimated from the baryon oscillation peaks in anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background.
  • We present results of weak lensing cluster counts obtained from 11 sq.deg SuprimeCam data. Although the area is much smaller than previous work dealing with weak lensing peak statistics, the number density of galaxies usable for weak lensing analysis is about twice as large as those. The higher galaxy number density reduces the noise in the weak lensing mass maps, and thus increases the signal-to-noise ratio of peaks of the lensing signal due to massive clusters. This enables us to construct a weak lensing selected cluster sample by adopting a high threshold S/N, such that the contamination rate due to false signals is small. We find 6 peaks with S/N>5. For all the peaks, previously identified clusters of galaxies are matched within a separation of 1 arcmin, demonstrating good correspondence between the peaks and clusters of galaxies. We evaluate the statistical error using mock weak lensing data, and find Npeak=6+/-3.1 in an effective area of 9.0 sq.deg. We compare the measured weak lensing cluster counts with the theoretical model prediction based on halo models and place the constraint on Omega_m-sigma_8 plane which is found to be consistent with currently standard LCDM models. It is demonstrated that the weak lensing cluster counts can place a unique constraint on sigma_8-c_0 plane, where c_0 is the normalization of the dark matter halo mass-concentration relationship. Finally we discuss prospects for ongoing/future wide field optical galaxy surveys.
  • We examined the anisotropic point spread function (PSF) of Suprime-Cam data utilizing dense star field data. We decomposed the PSF ellipticities into three components, the optical aberration, atmospheric turbulence, and chip-misalignment in an empirical manner, and evaluated the amplitude of each component. We found that, for long-exposure data, the optical aberration has the largest contribution to the PSF ellipticities, which could be modeled well by a simple analytic function based on the lowest-order aberration theory. The statistical properties of PSF ellipticities resulting from the atmospheric turbulence were investigated by using the numerical simulations. The simulation results are in a reasonable agreement with the observed data. It is also found that the optical PSF can be well corrected by the standard correction method with a polynomial fitting function. However, for the atmospheric PSF, its correction is affected by the common limitation caused by sparse sampling of PSFs due to a limited number of stars. We also examined the effects of the residual PSF anisotropies on Suprime-Cam cosmic shear data. We found that the shape and amplitude of the B-mode shear variance are broadly consistent with those of the residual PSF ellipticities measured from the dense star field data. This indicates that most of the sources of residual systematic are understood, which is an important step for cosmic shear statistics to be a practical tool of the precision cosmology.
  • Sky masking is unavoidable in wide-field weak lensing observations. We study how masks affect the measurement of statistics of matter distribution probed by weak gravitational lensing. We first use 1000 cosmological ray-tracing simulations to examine in detail the impact of masked regions on the weak lensing Minkowski Functionals (MFs). We consider actual sky masks used for a Subaru Suprime-Cam imaging survey. The masks increase the variance of the convergence field and the expected values of the MFs are biased. The bias then affects the non-Gaussian signals induced by the gravitational growth of structure. We then explore how masks affect cosmological parameter estimation. We calculate the cumulative signal-to-noise ratio S/N for masked maps to study the information content of lensing MFs. We show that the degradation of S/N for masked maps is mainly determined by the effective survey area. We also perform simple chi^2 analysis to show the impact of lensing MF bias due to masked regions. Finally, we compare ray-tracing simulations with data from a Subaru 2 deg^2 survey in order to address if the observed lensing MFs are consistent with those of the standard cosmology. The resulting chi^2/n_dof = 29.6/30 for three combined MFs, obtained with the mask effects taken into account, suggests that the observational data are indeed consistent with the standard LambdaCDM model. We conclude that the lensing MFs are powerful probe of cosmology only if mask effects are correctly taken into account.
  • Weak lensing provides an important route toward collecting samples of clusters of galaxies selected by mass. Subtle systematic errors in image reduction can compromise the power of this technique. We use the B-mode signal to quantify this systematic error and to test methods for reducing this error. We show that two procedures are efficient in suppressing systematic error in the B-mode: (1) refinement of the mosaic CCD warping procedure to conform to absolute celestial coordinates and (2) truncation of the smoothing procedure on a scale of 10$^{\prime}$. Application of these procedures reduces the systematic error to 20% of its original amplitude. We provide an analytic expression for the distribution of the highest peaks in noise maps that can be used to estimate the fraction of false peaks in the weak lensing $\kappa$-S/N maps as a function of the detection threshold. Based on this analysis we select a threshold S/N = 4.56 for identifying an uncontaminated set of weak lensing peaks in two test fields covering a total area of $\sim 3$deg$^2$. Taken together these fields contain seven peaks above the threshold. Among these, six are probable systems of galaxies and one is a superposition. We confirm the reliability of these peaks with dense redshift surveys, x-ray and imaging observations. The systematic error reduction procedures we apply are general and can be applied to future large-area weak lensing surveys. Our high peak analysis suggests that with a S/N threshold of 4.5, there should be only 2.7 spurious weak lensing peaks even in an area of 1000 deg$^2$ where we expect $\sim$ 2000 peaks based on our Subaru fields.
  • We study the prospects for measuring the dark matter distribution of voids with stacked weak lensing. We select voids from a large set of $N$-body simulations, and explore their lensing signals with the full ray-tracing simulations including the effect of the large-scale structure along the line-of-sight. The lensing signals are compared with simple void model predictions to infer the three-dimensional mass distribution of voids. We show that the stacked weak lensing signals are detected at significant level (S/N$\geq5$) for a 5000 degree$^2$ survey area, for a wide range of void radii up to $\sim50$ Mpc. The error from the galaxy shape noise little affects lensing signals at large scale. It is also found that dense ridges around voids have a great impact on the weak lensing signals, suggesting that proper modeling of the void density profile including surrounding ridges is essential for extracting the average total underdens mass of voids.
  • We study the cosmological information contained in the Minkowski Functionals (MFs) of weak gravitational lensing convergence maps. We show that the MFs provide strong constraints on the local type primordial non-Gaussianity parameter f_NL. We run a set of cosmological N-body simulations and perform ray-tracing simulations of weak lensing, to generate 100 independent convergence maps of 25 deg^2 field-of-view for f_NL = -100, 0 and 100. We perform a Fisher analysis to study the degeneracy among other cosmological parameters such as the dark energy equation of state parameter w and the fluctuation amplitude sigma_8. We use fully nonlinear covariance matrices evaluated from 1000 ray-tracing simulations. For the upcoming wide-field observations such as Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam survey with the proposed survey area of 1500 deg^2, the primordial non-Gaussianity can be constrained with a level of f_NL ~ 80 and w ~ 0.036 by weak lensing MFs. If simply scaled by the effective survey area, a 20000 deg^2 lensing survey using Large Synoptic Survey Telescope will give constraints of f_NL ~ 25 and w ~ 0.013. We show that these constraints can be further improved by a tomographic method using source galaxies in multiple redshift bins.
  • We examine scatter and bias in weak lensing selected clusters, employing both an analytic model of dark matter haloes and numerical mock data of weak lensing cluster surveys. We pay special attention to effects of the diversity of dark matter distributions within clusters. We find that peak heights of the lensing convergence map correlates rather poorly with the virial mass of haloes. The correlation is tighter for the spherical overdensity mass with a higher mean interior density. We examine the dependence of the halo shape on the peak heights, and find that the rms scatter caused by the halo diversity scales linearly with the peak heights with the proportionality factor of 0.1-0.2. The noise originated from the halo shape is found to be comparable to the source galaxy shape noise and the cosmic shear noise. We find the significant halo orientation bias, i.e., weak lensing selected clusters on average have their major axes aligned with the line-of-sight direction. We compute the orientation bias using an analytic triaxial halo model and obtain results quite consistent with the ray-tracing results. We develop a prescription to analytically compute the number count of weak lensing peaks taking into account all the main sources of scatters in peak heights. We find that the improved analytic predictions agree well with the simulation results for high S/N peaks. We also compare the expected number count with our weak lensing analysis results for 4 sq deg of Subaru/Suprime-Cam observations and find a good agreement.
  • We study the lensing convergence power spectrum and its covariance for a standard LCDM cosmology. We run 400 cosmological N-body simulations and use the outputs to perform a total of 1000 independent ray-tracing simulations. We compare the simulation results with analytic model predictions. The semi-analytic model based on Smith et al.(2003) fitting formula underestimates the convergence power by ~30% at arc-minute angular scales. For the convergence power spectrum covariance, the halo model reproduces the simulation results remarkably well over a wide range of angular scales and source redshifts. The dominant contribution at small angular scales comes from the sample variance due to the number fluctuations of halos in a finite survey volume. The signal-to-noise ratio for the convergence power spectrum is degraded by the non-Gaussian covariances by up to a factor 5 for a weak lensing survey to z_s ~1. The probability distribution of the convergence power spectrum estimators, among the realizations, is well approximated by a chi-square distribution with broadened variance given by the non-Gaussian covariance, but has a larger positive tail. The skewness and kurtosis have non-negligible values especially for a shallow survey. We argue that a prior knowledge on the full distribution may be needed to obtain an unbiased estimate on the ensemble averaged band power at each angular scale from a finite volume survey.
  • We perform high resolution ray-tracing simulations to investigate probability distribution functions (PDFs) of lensing convergence, shear, and magnification on distant sources up to the redshift of $z_s=20$. We pay particular attention to the shot noise effect in $N$-body simulations by explicitly showing how it affects the variance of the convergence. We show that the convergence and magnification PDFs are closely related with each other via the approximate relation $\mu=(1-\kappa)^{-2}$, which can reproduce the behavior of PDFs surprisingly well up to the high magnification tail. The mean convergence measured in the source plane is found to be systematically negative, rather than zero as often assumed, and is correlated with the convergence variance. We provide simple analytical formulae for the PDFs, which reproduce simulated PDFs reasonably well for a wide range of redshifts and smoothing sizes. As explicit applications of our ray-tracing simulations, we examine the strong lensing probability and the magnification effects on the luminosity functions of distant galaxies and quasars.
  • Using a large set of ray-tracing in N-body simulations, we examine lensing profiles around massive dark haloes in detail, with a particular emphasis on the profile at around the virial radii. We compare radial convergence profiles, which are measured accurately in the ray-tracing simulations by stacking many dark haloes, with our simple analytic model predictions. Our analytic models consist of a main halo, which is modelled by the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density profile with three different forms of the truncation, plus the correlated matter (2-halo term) around the main halo. We find that the smoothly truncated NFW profile best reproduces the simulated lensing profiles, out to more than 10 times the virial radius. We then use this analytic model to investigate potential biases in cluster weak lensing studies in which a single, untruncated NFW component is usually assumed in interpreting observed signals. We find that cluster masses, inferred by fitting reduced tangential shear profiles with the NFW profile, tend to be underestimated by ~5-10% if fitting is performed out to ~10'-30'. In contrast, the concentration parameter is overestimated typically by ~20% for the same fitting range. We also investigate biases in computing the signal-to-noise ratio of weak lensing mass peaks, finding them to be <4% for significant mass peaks. In the Appendices, we provide useful formulae for the smoothly truncated NFW profile.
  • Using 1000 ray-tracing simulations for a {\Lambda}-dominated cold dark model in Sato et al. (2009), we study the covariance matrix of cosmic shear correlation functions, which is the standard statistics used in the previous measurements. The shear correlation function of a particular separation angle is affected by Fourier modes over a wide range of multipoles, even beyond a survey area, which complicates the analysis of the covariance matrix. To overcome such obstacles we first construct Gaussian shear simulations from the 1000 realizations, and then use the Gaussian simulations to disentangle the Gaussian covariance contribution to the covariance matrix we measured from the original simulations. We found that an analytical formula of Gaussian covariance overestimates the covariance amplitudes due to an effect of finite survey area. Furthermore, the clean separation of the Gaussian covariance allows to examine the non-Gaussian covariance contributions as a function of separation angles and source redshifts. For upcoming surveys with typical source redshifts of z_s=0.6 and 1.0, the non-Gaussian contribution to the diagonal covariance components at 1 arcminute scales is greater than the Gaussian contribution by a factor of 20 and 10, respectively. Predictions based on the halo model qualitatively well reproduce the simulation results, however show a sizable disagreement in the covariance amplitudes. By combining these simulation results we develop a fitting formula to the covariance matrix for a survey with arbitrary area coverage, taking into account effects of the finiteness of survey area on the Gaussian covariance.
  • Galaxy clusters are usually detected in blind optical surveys via suitable filtering methods. We present an optimal matched filter which maximizes their signal-to-noise ratio by taking advantage of the knowledge we have of their intrinsic physical properties and of the data noise properties. In this paper we restrict our application to galaxy magnitudes, positions and photometric redshifts if available, and we also apply the filter separately to weak lensing data. The method is suitable to be naturally extended to a multi-band approach which could include not only additional optical bands but also observables with different nature such as X-rays. For each detection, the filter provides its significance, an estimate for the richness and for the redshift even if photo-z are not given. The provided analytical error estimate is tested against numerical simulations. We finally apply our method to the COSMOS field and compare the results with previous cluster detections obtained with different methods. Our catalogue contains 27 galaxy clusters with minimal threshold at 3-sigma level including both optical and weak-lensing information.
  • We present deep J-, H-, and Ks-band imaging data of the MOIRCS Deep Survey (MODS), which was carried out with Multi-Object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph (MOIRCS) mounted on the Subaru telescope in the GOODS-North region. The data reach 5sigma total limiting magnitudes for point sources of J=23.9, H=22.8, and Ks=22.8 (Vega magnitude) over 103 arcmin^2 (wide field). In 28 arcmin^2 of the survey area, which is ultra deep field of the MODS (deep field), the data reach the 5sigma depths of J=24.8, H=23.4, and Ks=23.8. The spatial resolutions of the combined images are FWHM ~ 0.6 arcsec and ~ 0.5 arcsec for the wide and deep fields in all bands, respectively. Combining the MODS data with the multi-wavelength public data taken with the HST, Spitzer, and other ground-based telescopes in the GOODS field, we construct a multi-wavelength photometric catalog of Ks-selected sources. Using the catalog, we present Ks-band number counts and near-infrared color distribution of the detected objects, and demonstrate some selection techniques with the NIR colors for high redshift galaxies. These data and catalog are publicly available via internet.
  • We develop a pseudo power spectrum technique for measuring the lensing power spectrum from weak lensing surveys in both the full sky and flat sky limits. The power spectrum approaches have a number of advantages over the traditional correlation function approach. We test the pseudo spectrum method by using numerical simulations with square-shape boundary that include masked regions with complex configuration due to bright stars and saturated spikes. Even when 25% of total area of the survey is masked, the method recovers the E-mode power spectrum at a sub-percent precision over a wide range of multipoles 100<l<10000. The systematic error is smaller than the statistical errors expected for a 2000 square degree survey. The residual B-mode spectrum is well suppressed in the amplitudes at less than a percent level relative to the E-mode. We also find that the correlated errors of binned power spectra caused by the survey geometry effects are not significant. Our method is applicable to the current and upcoming wide-field lensing surveys.