• Learning based on networks of real neurons, and by extension biologically inspired models of neural networks, has yet to find general learning rules leading to widespread applications. In this paper, we argue for the existence of a principle allowing to steer the dynamics of a biologically inspired neural network. Using carefully timed external stimulation, the network can be driven towards a desired dynamical state. We term this principle "Learning by Stimulation Avoidance" (LSA). We demonstrate through simulation that the minimal sufficient conditions leading to LSA in artificial networks are also sufficient to reproduce learning results similar to those obtained in biological neurons by Shahaf and Marom [1]. We examine the mechanism's basic dynamics in a reduced network, and demonstrate how it scales up to a network of 100 neurons. We show that LSA has a higher explanatory power than existing hypotheses about the response of biological neural networks to external simulation, and can be used as a learning rule for an embodied application: learning of wall avoidance by a simulated robot. The surge in popularity of artificial neural networks is mostly directed to disembodied models of neurons with biologically irrelevant dynamics: to the authors' knowledge, this is the first work demonstrating sensory-motor learning with random spiking networks through pure Hebbian learning.
  • A social tagging system allows users to add arbitrary strings, called "tags", on a shared resource to organize and manage information. The Yule--Simon process, which has shown the ability to capture the population dynamics of social tagging behavior, does not handle the mechanism of new vocabulary creation because it assumes that new vocabulary creation is a Poisson-like random process. In this research, we focus on the mechanism of vocabulary creation from the microscopic perspective and discuss whether it also follows the random process assumed in the Yule--Simon process. To capture the microscopic mechanism of vocabulary creation, we focus on the relationship between the number of tags used in the same entry and the local vocabulary creation rate. We find that the relationship is not the result of a simple random process, and differs between services. Furthermore, these differences depend on whether the user's tagging attitudes are private or open. These results provide the potential for a new index to identify the service's intrinsic nature.
  • We present some arguments why existing methods for representing agents fall short in applications crucial to artificial life. Using a thought experiment involving a fictitious dynamical systems model of the biosphere we argue that the metabolism, motility, and the concept of counterfactual variation should be compatible with any agent representation in dynamical systems. We then propose an information-theoretic notion of \emph{integrated spatiotemporal patterns} which we believe can serve as the basic building block of an agent definition. We argue that these patterns are capable of solving the problems mentioned before. We also test this in some preliminary experiments.
  • Memories in the brain are separated in two categories: short-term and long-term memories. Long-term memories remain for a lifetime, while short-term ones exist from a few milliseconds to a few minutes. Within short-term memory studies, there is debate about what neural structure could implement it. Indeed, mechanisms responsible for long-term memories appear inadequate for the task. Instead, it has been proposed that short-term memories could be sustained by the persistent activity of a group of neurons. In this work, we explore what topology could sustain short-term memories, not by designing a model from specific hypotheses, but through Darwinian evolution in order to obtain new insights into its implementation. We evolved 10 networks capable of retaining information for a fixed duration between 2 and 11s. Our main finding has been that the evolution naturally created two functional modules in the network: one which sustains the information containing primarily excitatory neurons, while the other, which is responsible for forgetting, was composed mainly of inhibitory neurons. This demonstrates how the balance between inhibition and excitation plays an important role in cognition.
  • In this study, we investigate the adaptation and robustness of a packet switching network (PSN), the fundamental architecture of the Internet. We claim that the adaptation introduced by a transmission control protocol (TCP) congestion control mechanism is interpretable as the self-organization of multiple attractors and stability to switch from one attractor to another. To discuss this argument quantitatively, we study the adaptation of the Internet by simulating a PSN using ns-2. Our hypothesis is that the robustness and fragility of the Internet can be attributed to the inherent dynamics of the PSN feedback mechanism called the congestion window size, or \textit{cwnd}. By varying the data input into the PSN system, we investigate the possible self-organization of attractors in cwnd temporal dynamics and discuss the adaptability and robustness of PSNs. The present study provides an example of Ashby's Law of Requisite Variety in action.
  • The state space of a conventional Hopfield network typically exhibits many different attractors of which only a small subset satisfy constraints between neurons in a globally optimal fashion. It has recently been demonstrated that combining Hebbian learning with occasional alterations of normal neural states avoids this problem by means of self-organized enlargement of the best basins of attraction. However, so far it is not clear to what extent this process of self-optimization is also operative in real brains. Here we demonstrate that it can be transferred to more biologically plausible neural networks by implementing a self-optimizing spiking neural network model. In addition, by using this spiking neural network to emulate a Hopfield network with Hebbian learning, we attempt to make a connection between rate-based and temporal coding based neural systems. Although further work is required to make this model more realistic, it already suggests that the efficacy of the self-optimizing process is independent from the simplifying assumptions of a conventional Hopfield network. We also discuss natural and cultural processes that could be responsible for occasional alteration of neural firing patterns in actual brains
  • A salient dynamic property of social media is bursting behavior. In this paper, we study bursting behavior in terms of the temporal relation between a preceding baseline fluctuation and the successive burst response using a frequency time series of 3,000 keywords on Twitter. We found that there is a fluctuation threshold up to which the burst size increases as the fluctuation increases and that above the threshold, there appears a variety of burst sizes. We call this threshold the critical threshold. Investigating this threshold in relation to endogenous bursts and exogenous bursts based on peak ratio and burst size reveals that the bursts below this threshold are endogenously caused and above this threshold, exogenous bursts emerge. Analysis of the 3,000 keywords shows that all the nouns have both endogenous and exogenous origins of bursts and that each keyword has a critical threshold in the baseline fluctuation value to distinguish between the two. Having a threshold for an input value for activating the system implies that Twitter is an excitable medium. These findings are useful for characterizing how excitable a keyword is on Twitter and could be used, for example, to predict the response to particular information on social media.
  • Scientists have traditionally limited the mechanisms of social cognition to one brain, but recent approaches claim that interaction also realizes cognitive work. Experiments under constrained virtual settings revealed that interaction dynamics implicitly guide social cognition. Here we show that embodied social interaction can be constitutive of agency detection and of experiencing another`s presence. Pairs of participants moved their "avatars" along an invisible virtual line and could make haptic contact with three identical objects, two of which embodied the other`s motions, but only one, the other`s avatar, also embodied the other`s contact sensor and thereby enabled responsive interaction. Co-regulated interactions were significantly correlated with identifications of the other`s avatar and reports of the clearest awareness of the other`s presence. These results challenge folk psychological notions about the boundaries of mind, but make sense from evolutionary and developmental perspectives: an extendible mind can offload cognitive work into its environment.
  • Due to recent advances in synthetic biology and artificial life, the origin of life is currently a hot topic of research. We review the literature and argue that the two traditionally competing "replicator-first" and "metabolism-first" approaches are merging into one integrated theory of individuation and evolution. We contribute to the maturation of this more inclusive approach by highlighting some problematic assumptions that still lead to an impoverished conception of the phenomenon of life. In particular, we argue that the new consensus has so far failed to consider the relevance of intermediate timescales. We propose that an adequate theory of life must account for the fact that all living beings are situated in at least four distinct timescales, which are typically associated with metabolism, motility, development, and evolution. On this view, self-movement, adaptive behavior and morphological changes could have already been present at the origin of life. In order to illustrate this possibility we analyze a minimal model of life-like phenomena, namely of precarious, individuated, dissipative structures that can be found in simple reaction-diffusion systems. Based on our analysis we suggest that processes in intermediate timescales could have already been operative in prebiotic systems. They may have facilitated and constrained changes occurring in the faster- and slower-paced timescales of chemical self-individuation and evolution by natural selection, respectively.
  • The output of renewable energy fluctuates significantly depending on weather conditions. We develop a unit commitment model to analyze requirements of the forecast output and its error for renewable energies. Our model obtains the time series for the operational state of thermal power plants that would maximize the profits of an electric power utility by taking into account both the forecast of output its error for renewable energies and the demand response of consumers. We consider a power system consisting of thermal power plants, photovoltaic systems (PV), and wind farms and analyze the effect of the forecast error on the operation cost and reserves. We confirm that the operation cost was increases with the forecast error. The effect of a sudden decrease in wind power is also analyzed. More thermal power plants need to be operated to generate power to absorb this sudden decrease in wind power. The increase in the number of operating thermal power plants within a short period does not affect the total operation cost significantly; however the substitution of thermal power plants by wind farms or PV systems is not expected to be very high. Finally, the effects of the demand response in the case of a sudden decrease in wind power are analyzed. We confirm that the number of operating thermal power plants is reduced by the demand response. A power utility has to continue thermal power plants for ensuring supply-demand balance; some of these plants can be decommissioned after installing a large number of wind farms or PV systems, if the demand response is applied using an appropriate price structure.
  • This paper presents a detailed characterization of the trajectory of a single housefly with free range of a square cage. The trajectory of the fly was recorded and transformed into a time series, which was fully analyzed using an autoregressive model, which describes a stationary time series by a linear regression of prior state values with the white noise. The main discovery was that the fly switched styles of motion from a low dimensional regular pattern to a higher dimensional disordered pattern. This discovered exploratory behavior is, irrespective of the presence of food, characterized by anomalous diffusion.
  • Turn-taking behaviour is simulated in a coupled agents system. Each agent is modelled as a mobile robot with two wheels. A recurrent neural network is used to produce the motor outputs and to hold the internal dynamics. Agents are developed to take turns on a two-dimensional arena by causing the network structures to evolve. Turn-taking is established using either regular or chaotic behaviour of the agents. It is found that chaotic turn-takers are more sensitive to the adaptive inputs from the other agent. Conversely, regular turn-takers are comparatively robust against noisy inputs, owing to their restricted dynamics. From many observations, including turn-taking with virtual agents, we claim that there is a complementary relationship between robustness and adaptability. Furthermore, by investigating the recoupling of agents from different GA generations, we report the emergence of a new turn-taking behaviour. Potential for synthesizing a new form of motion is another characteristic of chaotic turn-takers.
  • We construct a simple model of a proto-cell that simulates a stochastic dynamics of abstract chemicals on a two-dimensional lattice. We assume that chemicals catalyze their reproduction through interaction with each other, and that between some chemicals repulsion occurs. We have shown that chemicals organize themselves into a cell-like structure that maintains its membranes dynamically. Further, we have obtained cells that can divide themselves automatically into daughter cells.
  • A new approach for the study of social games and communications is proposed. Games are simulated between cognitive players who build the opponent's internal model and decide their next strategy from predictions based on the model. In this paper, internal models are constructed by the recurrent neural network (RNN), and the iterated prisoner's dilemma game is performed. The RNN allows us to express the internal model in a geometrical shape. The complicated transients of actions are observed before the stable mutually defecting equilibrium is reached. During the transients, the model shape also becomes complicated and often experiences chaotic changes. These new chaotic dynamics of internal models reflect the dynamical and high-dimensional rugged landscape of the internal model space.