• Recent theoretical work has shown that the pre-main-sequence (PMS) evolution of stars is much more complex than previously envisioned. Instead of the traditional steady, one-dimensional solution, accretion may be episodic and not necessarily symmetrical, thereby affecting the energy deposited inside the star and its interior structure. Given this new framework, we want to understand what controls the evolution of accreting stars. We use the MESA stellar evolution code with various sets of conditions. In particular, we account for the (unknown) efficiency of accretion in burying gravitational energy into the protostar through a parameter, $\xi$, and we vary the amount of deuterium present. We confirm the findings of previous works that the evolution changes significantly with the amount of energy that is lost during accretion. We find that deuterium burning also regulates the PMS evolution. In the low-entropy accretion scenario, the evolutionary tracks in the H-R diagram are significantly different from the classical tracks and are sensitive to the deuterium content. A comparison of theoretical evolutionary tracks and observations allows us to exclude some cold accretion models ($\xi\sim 0$) with low deuterium abundances. We confirm that the luminosity spread seen in clusters can be explained by models with a somewhat inefficient injection of accretion heat. The resulting evolutionary tracks then become sensitive to the accretion heat efficiency, initial core entropy, and deuterium content. In this context, we predict that clusters with a higher D/H ratio should have less scatter in luminosity than clusters with a smaller D/H. Future work on this issue should include radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to determine the efficiency of accretion heating and further observations to investigate the deuterium content in star-forming regions. (abbrev.)
  • In the Solar System, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) originating mainly from asteroid collisions and cometary activities drift to the Earth orbit due to the Poynting-Robertson drag. We analyzed the thermal emission from IDPs that was observed by the first Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, AKARI. The observed surface brightness in the trailing direction of the Earth orbit is 3.7% greater than that in the leading direction in the $9{\rm \mu m}$ band and 3.0% in the $18{\rm \mu m}$ band. In order to reveal dust properties causing the leading-trailing surface brightness asymmetry, we numerically integrated orbits of the Sun, the Earth, and a dust particle as a restricted three-body problem including radiation from the Sun. The initial orbits of particles are determined according to the orbits of main-belt asteroids or Jupiter-family comets. The orbital trapping in mean motion resonances results in a significant leading-trailing asymmetry so that intermediate sized dust (~10-100${\rm \mu m}$) produces a greater asymmetry than the zodiacal light has. The leading-trailing surface brightness difference integrated over the size distribution of the asteroidal dust is obtained to be the values of 27.7% and 25.3% in the $9{\rm \mu m}$ and $18{\rm \mu m}$ bands, respectively. In contrast, the brightness difference for cometary dust is calculated as the values of 3.6% and 3.1% in the $9{\rm \mu m}$ and $18{\rm \mu m}$ bands, respectively, if the maximum dust radius is set to be $s_{\rm max} = 3000{\rm \mu m}$. Taking into account these values and their errors, we conclude that the contribution of asteroidal dust to the zodiacal infrared emission is less than ~10%, while cometary dust of the order of 1 mm mainly accounts for the zodiacal light in infrared.
  • Protoplanetary disks with non-axisymmetric structures have been observed. The Rossby wave instability (RWI) is considered as one of the origins of the non-axisymmetric structures. We perform linear stability analyses of the RWI in barotropic flow using four representative types of the background flow on a wide parameter space. We find that the co-rotation radius is located at the background vortensity minimum with large concavity if the system is marginally stable to the RWI, and this allows us to check the stability against the RWI easily. We newly derive the necessary and sufficient condition for the onset of the RWI in semi-analytic form. We discuss the applicability of the new condition in realistic systems and the physical nature of the RWI.
  • A giant planet creates a gap in a protoplanetary disk, which might explain the observed gaps in protoplanetary disks. The width and depth of the gaps depend on the planet mass and disk properties. We have performed two--dimensional hydrodynamic simulations for various planet masses, disk aspect ratios and viscosities, to obtain an empirical formula for the gap width. The gap width is proportional to the square root of the planet mass, -3/4 power of the disk aspect ratio and -1/4 power of the viscosity. This empirical formula enables us to estimate the mass of a planet embedded in the disk from the width of an observed gap. We have applied the empirical formula for the gap width to the disk around HL~Tau, assuming that each gap observed by ALMA observations is produced by planets, and discussed the planet masses within the gaps. The estimate of planet masses from the gap widths is less affected by the observational resolution and dust filtration than that from the gap depth.
  • Layered accretion is one of the inevitable ingredients in protoplanetary disks when disk turbulence is excited by magnetorotational instabilities (MRIs). In the accretion, disk surfaces where MRIs fully operate have a high value of disk accretion rate ($\dot{M}$), while the disk midplane where MRIs are generally quenched ends up with a low value of $\dot{M}$. Significant progress on understanding MRIs has recently been made by a number of dedicated MHD simulations, which requires improvement of the classical treatment of $\alpha$ in 1D disk models. To this end, we obtain a new expression of $\alpha$ by utilizing an empirical formula that is derived from recent MHD simulations of stratified disks with Ohmic diffusion. It is interesting that this new formulation can be regarded as a general extension of the classical $\alpha$. Armed with the new $\alpha$, we perform a linear stability analysis of protoplanetary disks that undergo layered accretion, and find that a viscous instability can occur around the outer edge of dead zones. Disks become stable in using the classical $\alpha$. We identify that the difference arises from $\Sigma-$dependence of $\dot{M}$; whereas $\Sigma$ is uniquely determined for a given value of $\dot{M}$ in the classical approach, the new approach leads to $\dot{M}$ that is a multi-valued function of $\Sigma$. We confirm our finding both by exploring a parameter space as well as by performing the 1D, viscous evolution of disks. We finally discuss other non-ideal MHD effects that are not included in our analysis, but may affect our results.
  • We investigate the dust and gas distribution in the disk around HD 142527 based on ALMA observations of dust continuum, 13CO(3-2), and C18O(3-2) emission. The disk shows strong azimuthal asymmetry in the dust continuum emission, while gas emission is more symmetric. In this paper, we investigate how gas and dust are distributed in the dust-bright northern part of the disk and in the dust-faint southern part. We construct two axisymmetric disk models. One reproduces the radial profiles of the continuum and the velocity moments 0 and 1 of CO lines in the north and the other reproduces those in the south. We have found that the dust is concentrated in a narrow ring having ~50AU width (in FWHM; w_d=30AU in our parameter definition) located at ~170-200AU from the central star. The dust particles are strongly concentrated in the north. We have found that the dust surface density contrast between the north and south amounts to ~70. Compared to the dust, the gas distribution is more extended in the radial direction. We find that the gas component extends at least from ~100AU to ~250AU from the central star, and there should also be tenuous gas remaining inside and outside of these radii. The azimuthal asymmetry of gas distribution is much smaller than dust. The gas surface density differs only by a factor of ~3-10 between the north and south. Hence, gas-to-dust ratio strongly depends on the location of the disk: ~30 at the location of the peak of dust distribution in the south and ~3 at the location of the peak of dust distribution in the north. Despite large uncertainties, the overall gas-to-dust ratio is inferred to be ~10-30, indicating that the gas depletion may have already been under way.
  • Coronagraphic imagery of the circumstellar disk around HD 169142 in H-band polarized intensity (PI) with Subaru/HiCIAO is presented. The emission scattered by dust particles at the disk surface in 0.2" <= r <= 1.2", or 29 <= r <= 174 AU, is successfully detected. The azimuthally-averaged radial profile of the PI shows a double power-law distribution, in which the PIs in r=29-52 AU and r=81.2-145 AU respectively show r^{-3}-dependence. These two power-law regions are connected smoothly with a transition zone (TZ), exhibiting an apparent gap in r=40-70 AU. The PI in the inner power-law region shows a deep minimum whose location seems to coincide with the point source at \lambda = 7 mm. This can be regarded as another sign of a protoplanet in TZ. The observed radial profile of the PI is reproduced by a minimally flaring disk with an irregular surface density distribution or with an irregular temperature distribution or with the combination of both. The depletion factor of surface density in the inner power-law region (r< 50 AU) is derived to be <= 0.16 from a simple model calculation. The obtained PI image also shows small scale asymmetries in the outer power-law region. Possible origins for these asymmetries include corrugation of the scattering surface in the outer region, and shadowing effect by a puffed up structure in the inner power-law region.
  • A giant planet embedded in a protoplanetary disk forms a gap. An analytic relationship among the gap depth, planet mass $M_{p}$, disk aspect ratio $h_p$, and viscosity $\alpha$ has been found recently, and the gap depth can be written in terms of a single parameter $K= (M_{p}/M_{\ast})^2 h_p^{-5} \alpha^{-1}$. We discuss how observed gap features can be used to constrain the disk and/or planet parameters based on the analytic formula for the gap depth. The constraint on the disk aspect ratio is critical in determining the planet mass so the combination of the observations of the temperature and the image can provide a constraint on the planet mass. We apply the formula for the gap depth to observations of HL~Tau and HD~169142. In the case of HL~Tau, we propose that a planet with $\gtrsim 0.3$ is responsible for the observed gap at $30$~AU from the central star based on the estimate that the gap depth is $\lesssim 1/3$. In the case of HD~169142, the planet mass that causes the gap structure recently found by VLA is $\gtrsim 0.4 M_J$. We also argue that the spiral structure, if observed, can be used to estimate the lower limit of the disk aspect ratio and the planet mass.
  • The gap formation induced by a giant planet is important in the evolution of the planet and the protoplanetary disc. We examine the gap formation by a planet with a new formulation of one-dimensional viscous discs which takes into account the deviation from Keplerian disc rotation due to the steep gradient of the surface density. This formulation enables us to naturally include the Rayleigh stable condition for the disc rotation. It is found that the derivation from Keplerian disc rotation promotes the radial angular momentum transfer and makes the gap shallower than in the Keplerian case. For deep gaps, this shallowing effect becomes significant due to the Rayleigh condition. In our model, we also take into account the propagation of the density waves excited by the planet, which widens the range of the angular momentum deposition to the disc. The effect of the wave propagation makes the gap wider and shallower than the case with instantaneous wave damping. With these shallowing effects, our one-dimensional gap model is consistent with the recent hydrodynamic simulations.
  • We study the time evolution of a large-scale magnetic flux threading an accretion disk. Induction equation of the mean poloidal field is solved under the standard viscous disk model. Magnetic flux evolution is controlled by the two timescales: One is the timescale of the inward advection of the magnetic flux, tau_{adv}. This is induced by the dragging of the flux by the accreting gas. The other is the outward diffusion timescale of the magnetic flux tau_{dif}. We consider diffusion due to the Ohmic resistivity. These timescales can be significantly different from the disk viscous timescale tau_{disk}. The behaviors of the magnetic flux evolution is quite different depending on the magnitude relationship of the timescales tau_{adv}, \tau_{dif}, and tau_{disk}. The most interesting phenomena occurs when tau_{adv} << tau_{dif}, tau_{disk}. In such a case, the magnetic flux distribution approaches a quasi-steady profile much faster than the viscous evolution of the gas disk, and also the magnetic flux has been tightly bundled to the inner part of the disk. In the inner part, although the poloidal magnetic field becomes much stronger than the interstellar magnetic field, the field strength is limited to the maximum value that is analytically given by our previous work (Okuzumi et al. 2014, ApJ, 785, 127). We also find a condition for that the initial large magnetic flux, which is a fossil of the magnetic field dragging during the early phase of star formation, survives for a duration in which significant gas disk evolution proceeds.
  • We analytically calculate the marginally stable surface density profile for rotational instability of protoplanetary disks. The derived profile can be utilized for considering the region in a rotating disk where radial pressure gradient force is comparable to the gravitational force, such as an inner edge, steep gaps or bumps and an outer region of the disk. In this paper we especially focus on the rotational instability in the outer region of disks. We find an protoplanetary disk with a surface density profile of similarity solution becomes rotationally unstable at a certain radius, depending on its temperature profile and a mass of the central star. If the temperature is relatively low and the mass of the central star is high, disks have rotationally stable similarity profiles. Otherwise, deviation from the similarity profiles of surface density could be observable, using facilities with high sensitivity, such as ALMA.
  • Large-scale magnetic fields are key ingredients of magnetically driven disk accretion. We study how large-scale poloidal fields evolve in accretion disks, with the primary aim of quantifying the viability of magnetic accretion mechanisms in protoplanetary disks. We employ a kinematic mean-field model for poloidal field transport and focus on steady states where inward advection of a field balances with outward diffusion due to effective resistivities. We analytically derive the steady-state radial distribution of poloidal fields in highly conducting accretion disks. The analytic solution reveals an upper limit on the strength of large-scale vertical fields attainable in steady states. Any excess poloidal field will be diffused away within a finite time, and we demonstrate this with time-dependent numerical calculations of the mean-field equations. We apply this upper limit to large-scale vertical fields threading protoplanetary disks. We find that the maximum attainable strength is about 0.1 G at 1 AU, and about 1 mG at 10 AU from the central star. When combined with recent magnetic accretion models, the maximum field strength translates into the maximum steady-state accretion rate of $\sim 10^{-7} M_\odot {\rm yr}^{-1}$, in agreement with observations. We also find that the maximum field strength is ~ 1 kG at the surface of the central star provided that the disk extends down to the stellar surface. This implies that any excess stellar poloidal field of strength >~ kG can be transported to the surrounding disk. This might in part resolve the magnetic flux problem in star formation.
  • We report ALMA observations of dust continuum, 13CO J=3--2, and C18O J=3--2 line emission toward a gapped protoplanetary disk around HD 142527. The outer horseshoe-shaped disk shows the strong azimuthal asymmetry in dust continuum with the contrast of about 30 at 336 GHz between the northern peak and the southwestern minimum. In addition, the maximum brightness temperature of 24 K at its northern area is exceptionally high at 160 AU from a star. To evaluate the surface density in this region, the grain temperature needs to be constrained and was estimated from the optically thick 13CO J=3--2 emission. The lower limit of the peak surface density was then calculated to be 28 g cm-2 by assuming a canonical gas-to-dust mass ratio of 100. This finding implies that the region is locally too massive to withstand self-gravity since Toomre's Q <~1--2, and thus, it may collapse into a gaseous protoplanet. Another possibility is that the gas mass is low enough to be gravitationally stable and only dust grains are accumulated. In this case, lower gas-to-dust ratio by at least 1 order of magnitude is required, implying possible formation of a rocky planetary core.
  • We estimate minimum dust abundances required for secular gravitational instability (SGI) to operate at the midplane dust layer of protoplanetary disks. For SGI to be a viable process, the growth time of the instability T_grow must be shorter than the radial drift time of the dust T_drift. The growth time depends on the turbulent diffusion parameter alpha, because the modes with short wavelengths are stabilized by turbulent diffusion. Assuming that turbulence is excited via the Kelvin-Helmholtz or streaming instabilities in the dust layer, and that its strength is controlled by the energy supply rate from dust accretion, we estimate the diffusion parameter and the growth time of the instability. The condition T_grow < T_drift requires that the dust abundance must be greater than a critical abundance Z_min, which is a function of the Toomre parameter Q_g and aspect ratio h_g / r of the gas disk. For a wide range of parameter space, the required dust abundance is less than 0.1. A slight increase in dust abundance opens a possible route for the dust to directly collapse to planetesimals.
  • We study the turbulence induced in the dust layer of a protoplanetary disk based on the energetics of dust accretion due to gas drag. We estimate turbulence strength from the energy supplied by dust accretion, using the radial drift velocity of the dust particles in a laminar disk. Our estimate of the turbulence strength agrees with previous analytical and numerical research on the turbulence induced by Kelvin-Helmholtz and/or streaming instabilities for particles whose stopping time is less than the Keplerian time. For such small particles, the strongest turbulence is expected to occur when the dust-to-gas ratio of the disk is ~C_eff^(1/2) (h_g / r) ~ 10^(-2), where C_eff ~ 0.2 represents the energy supply efficiency to turbulence and h_g / r ~ 5 x 10^(-2) is the aspect ratio of the gas disk. The maximum viscosity parameter is alpha_max ~ C_eff T_s (h_g / r)^2 ~ 10^(-4) T_s, where T_s (<1) is the non-dimensional stopping time of the dust particles. Modification in the dust-to-gas ratio from the standard value, 10^(-2), by any process, results in weaker turbulence and a thinner dust layer, and consequently may accelerate the growth process of the dust particles.
  • We present a new analytic approach to the disk-planet interaction that is especially useful for planets with eccentricity larger than the disk aspect ratio. We make use of the dynamical friction formula to calculate the force exerted on the planet by the disk, and the force is averaged over the period of the planet. The resulting migration and eccentricity damping timescale agrees very well with the previous works in which the planet eccentricity is moderately larger than the disk aspect ratio. The advantage of this approach is that it is possible to apply this formulation to arbitrary large eccentricity. We have found that the timescale of the orbital evolution depends largely on the adopted disk model in the case of highly eccentric planets. We discuss the possible implication of our results to the theory of planet formation.
  • Coagulation of submicron-sized dust grains into porous aggregates is the initial step of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. Recently, it has been pointed out that negative charging of dust in the weakly ionized disks could significantly slow down the coagulation process. In this paper, we apply the growth criteria obtained in Paper I to finding out a location ("frozen" zone) where the charging stalls dust growth at the fractal growth stage. For low-turbulence disks, we find that the frozen zone can cover the major part of the disks at a few to 100 AU from the central star. The maximum mass of the aggregates is approximately 10^{-7} g at 1 AU and as small as a few monomer masses at 100 AU. Strong turbulence can significantly reduce the size of the frozen zone, but such turbulence will cause the fragmentation of macroscopic aggregates at later stages. We examine a possibility that complete freezeout of dust evolution in low-turbulence disks could be prevented by global transport of dust in the disks. Our simple estimation shows that global dust transport can lead to the supply of macroscopic aggregates and the removal of frozen aggregates on a timescale of 10^6 yr. This overturns the usual understanding that tiny dust particles get depleted on much shorter timescales unless collisional fragmentation is effective. The frozen zone together with global dust transport might explain "slow" (\sim 10^6 yr) dust evolution suggested by infrared observation of T Tauri stars and by radioactive dating of chondrites.
  • Collisional growth of submicron-sized dust grains into macroscopic aggregates is the first step of planet formation in protoplanetary disks. These grains are expected to carry nonzero negative charges in the weakly ionized disks, but its effect on their collisional growth has not been fully understood so far. In this paper, we investigate how the charging affects the evolution of the dust size distribution properly taking into account the charging mechanism in a weakly ionized gas as well as porosity evolution through low-energy collisions. To clarify the role of the size distribution, we divide our analysis into two steps. First, we analyze the collisional growth of charged aggregates assuming a monodisperse (i.e., narrow) size distribution. We show that the monodisperse growth stalls due to the electrostatic repulsion when a certain condition is met, as is already expected in the previous work. Second, we numerically simulate dust coagulation using Smoluchowski's method to see how the outcome changes when the size distribution is allowed to freely evolve. We find that, under certain conditions, the dust undergoes bimodal growth where only a limited number of aggregates continue to grow carrying the major part of the dust mass in the system. This occurs because remaining small aggregates efficiently sweep up free electrons to prevent the larger aggregates from being strongly charged. We obtain a set of simple criteria that allows us to predict how the size distribution evolves for a given condition. In Paper II (arXiv:1009.3101), we apply these criteria to dust growth in protoplanetary disks.
  • We study dust accumulation by photophoresis in optically thin gas disks. Using formulae of the photophoretic force that are applicable for the free molecular regime and for the slip-flow regime, we calculate dust accumulation distances as a function of the particle size. It is found that photophoresis pushes particles (smaller than 10 cm) outward. For a Sun-like star, these particles are transported to 0.1-100 AU, depending on the particle size, and forms an inner disk. Radiation pressure pushes out small particles (< 1 mm) further and forms an extended outer disk. Consequently, an inner hole opens inside ~0.1 AU. The radius of the inner hole is determined by the condition that the mean free path of the gas molecules equals the maximum size of the particles that photophoresis effectively works on (100 micron - 10 cm, depending on the dust property). The dust disk structure formed by photophoresis can be distinguished from the structure of gas-free dust disk models, because the particle sizes of the outer disks are larger, and the inner hole radius depends on the gas density.
  • We construct a protostellar disk model that takes into account the combined effect of viscous evolution, photoevaporation and the differential radial motion of dust grains and gas. For T Tauri disks, the lifetimes of dust disks that are mainly composed of millimeter sized grains are always shorter than the gas disks' lifetimes, and become similar only when the grains are fluffy (density < 0.1 g cm^{-3}). If grain growth during the classical T Tauri phase produces plenty of millimeter sized grains, such grains completely accrete onto the star in 10^7 yr, before photoevaporation begins to drain the inner gas disk and the star evolves to the weak line T Tauri phase. In the weak line phase, only dust-poor gas disks remain at large radii (> 10 AU), without strong signs of gas accretion nor of millimeter thermal emission from the dust. For Herbig AeBe stars, the strong photoevaporation clears the inner disks in 10^6 yr, before the dust grains in the outer disk migrate to the inner region. In this case, the grains left behind in the outer gas disk accumulate at the disk inner edge (at 10-100 AU from the star). The dust grains remain there even after the entire gas disk has been photoevaporated, and form a gas-poor dust ring similar to that observed around HR 4796A. Hence, depending on the strength of the stellar ionizing flux, our model predicts opposite types of products around young stars. For low mass stars with a low photoevaporation rate, dust-poor gas disks with an inner hole would form, whereas for high mass stars with a high photoevaporation rate, gas-poor dust rings would form. This prediction should be examined by observations of gas and dust around weak line T Tauri stars and evolved Herbig AeBe stars.
  • From millimeter observations of classical T Tauri stars, it is suggested that dust grains in circumstellar disks have grown to millimeter size or larger. However, gas drag on such large grains induces rapid accretion of the dust. We examine the evolution of dust disks composed of millimeter sized grains, and show that rapid accretion of the dust disk causes attenuation of millimeter continuum emission. If a dust disk is composed mainly of grains of 1 cm to 1 m, its millimeter emission goes off within 10^6 yr. Hence, grains in this size range cannot be a main population of the dust. Considering our results together with grain growth suggested by the millimeter continuum observations, we expect that the millimeter continuum emission of disks comes mainly from grains in a narrow size range of [1 mm -1 cm]. This suggests either that growth of millimeter sized grains to centimeter size takes more than 10^6 yr, or that millimeter sized grains are continuously replenished. In the former case, planet formation is probably difficult, especially in the outer disks. In the latter case, reservoirs of millimeter grains are possibly large (> 10 m) bodies, which can reside in the disk more than 10^6 yr. Constraints on the grain growth time-scale are discussed for the above two cases.
  • Astrometric detection of a stellar wobble on the plane of the sky will provide us a next breakthrough in searching extrasolar planets. The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is expected to achieve a high-precision astrometry as accurate as 1 micro-as, which is precise enough to discover a new-born Jupiter mass planet around a pre-main-sequence (PMS) star in the Taurus-Auriga star forming region. PMS stars, however, have circum-stellar disks that may be obstacles to the precise measurement of the stellar position. We present results on disk influences to the stellar wobble. The density waves excited by a planet move both of the disk's mass center and the photo-center. The motion of the disk mass center induces an additional wobble of the stellar position, and the motion of the disk photo-center causes a contamination in the measurement of the stellar position. We show that the additional stellar motion dynamically caused by the disk's gravity is always negligible, but that the contamination of the disk light can interfere with the precise measurement of the stellar position, if the planet's mass is smaller than ~10 Jupiter mass. The motion of the disk photo-center is sensitive to a slight change in the wave pattern and the disk properties. Measurements by interferometers are generally insensitive to extended sources such as disks. Because of this property SIM will not suffer significant contaminations of the disk light, even if the planet's mass is as small as 1 Jupiter mass.
  • We study the outflow of dust particles on the surface layers of optically thick disks. At the surface of disks around young stars, small dust particles (size < 10 micron) experience stellar radiation pressure support and orbit more slowly than the surrounding gas. The resulting tail-wind imparts energy and angular momentum to the dust particles, moving them outward. This outflow occurs in the thin surface layer of the disk that is exposed to starlight, and the outward mass flux is carried primarily by particles of size ~0.1 micron. Beneath the irradiated surface layer, dust particles experience a head-wind, which drives them inward. For the specific case of a minimum-mass-solar-nebula, less than a thousandth of the dust mass experiences outward flow. If the stellar luminosity is 15 times brighter than the sun, however, or if the gas disk mass is as small as ~100 M_earth, then the surface outflow can dominate the inward flux in certain radial ranges, leading to the formation of rings or gaps in the dust disks.
  • We study the radial migration of dust particles in accreting protostellar disks analogous to the primordial solar nebula. This study takes account of the two dimensional (radial and normal) structure of the disk gas, including the effects of the variation in the gas velocity as a function of distance from the midplane. It is shown that the dust component of disks accretes slower than the gas component. At high altitude from the disk midplane, the gas rotates faster than particles because of the inward pressure gradient force, and its drag force causes particles to move outward in the radial direction. Viscous torque induces the gas within a scale height from the disk midplane to flow outward, carrying small (size < 100 micron at 10 AU) particles with it. Only particles at intermediate altitude or with sufficiently large sizes (> 1 mm at 10 AU) move inward. When the particles' radial velocities are averaged over the entire vertical direction, particles have a net inward flux. At large distances from the central star, particles migrate inward with a velocity much faster than the gas accretion velocity. However, their inward velocity is reduced below that of the gas in the inner regions of the disk. The rate of velocity decrease is a function of the particles' size. While larger particles retain fast accretion velocity until they approach closer to the star, 10 micron particles have slower velocity than the gas in the most part of the disk (r < 100 AU). This differential migration of particles causes the size fractionation. Dust disks composed mostly of small particles (size < 10 micron) accrete slower than gas disks, resulting in the increase in the dust-gas ratio during the gas accretion phase.
  • We analyze the dynamics of gas-dust coupling in the presence of stellar radiation pressure in circumstellar gas disks, which are in a transitional stage between the gas-dominated, optically thick, primordial nebulae, and the dust-dominated, optically thin Vega-type disks. Dust undergo radial migration, seeking a stable equilibrium orbit in corotation with gas. The migration of dust gives rise to radial fractionation of dust and creates a variety of possible observed disk morphologies, which we compute by considering the equilibrium between the dust production and the dust-dust collisions removing particles from their equilibrium orbits. Sand-sized and larger grains are distributed throughout most of the gas disk, with concentration near the gas pressure maximum in the inner disk. Smaller grains (typically in the range of 10 to 200 micron) concentrate in a prominent ring structure in the outer region of the gas disk (presumably at radius 100 AU), where gas density is rapidly declining with radius. The width and density, as well as density contrast of the dust ring with respect to the inner dust disk depend on the distribution of gas. Our results open the prospect for deducing the distribution of gas in circumstellar disks by observing their dust. We have qualitatively compared our models with two observed transitional disks around HR 4796A and HD 141569A. Dust migration can result in observation of a ring or a bimodal radial dust distribution, possibly very similar to the ones produced by gap-opening planet(s) embedded in the disk, or shepherding it from inside or outside. We conclude that a convincing planet detection via dust imaging should include specific non-axisymmetric structure following from the dynamical simulations of perturbed disks.