• We present the first decentralized multi-copter flock that performs stable autonomous outdoor flight with up to 10 flying agents. By decentralized and autonomous we mean that all members navigate themselves based on the dynamic information received from other robots in the vicinity. We do not use central data processing or control; instead, all the necessary computations are carried out by miniature on-board computers. The only global information the system exploits is from GPS receivers, while the units use wireless modules to share this positional information with other flock members locally. Collective behavior is based on a decentralized control framework with bio-inspiration from statistical physical modelling of animal swarms. In addition, the model is optimized for stable group flight even in a noisy, windy, delayed and error-prone environment. Using this framework we successfully implemented several fundamental collective flight tasks with up to 10 units: i) we achieved self-propelled flocking in a bounded area with self-organized object avoidance capabilities and ii) performed collective target tracking with stable formation flights (grid, rotating ring, straight line). With realistic numerical simulations we demonstrated that the local broadcast-type communication and the decentralized autonomous control method allows for the scalability of the model for much larger flocks.
  • Animal swarms displaying a variety of typical flocking patterns would not exist without underlying safe, optimal and stable dynamics of the individuals. The emergence of these universal patterns can be efficiently reconstructed with agent-based models. If we want to reproduce these patterns with artificial systems, such as autonomous aerial robots, agent-based models can also be used in the control algorithm of the robots. However, finding the proper algorithms and thus understanding the essential characteristics of the emergent collective behaviour of robots requires the thorough and realistic modeling of the robot and the environment as well. In this paper, first, we present an abstract mathematical model of an autonomous flying robot. The model takes into account several realistic features, such as time delay and locality of the communication, inaccuracy of the on-board sensors and inertial effects. We present two decentralized control algorithms. One is based on a simple self-propelled flocking model of animal collective motion, the other is a collective target tracking algorithm. Both algorithms contain a viscous friction-like term, which aligns the velocities of neighbouring agents parallel to each other. We show that this term can be essential for reducing the inherent instabilities of such a noisy and delayed realistic system. We discuss simulation results about the stability of the control algorithms, and perform real experiments to show the applicability of the algorithms on a group of autonomous quadcopters.