• In this paper, we propose to use the mimetic Horndeski model as a model for the dark universe. Both cold dark matter (CDM) and dark energy (DE) phenomena are described by a single component, the mimetic field. In linear theory, we show that this component effectively behaves like a perfect fluid with zero sound speed and clusters on all scales. For the simpler mimetic cubic Horndeski model, if the background expansion history is chosen to be identical to a perfect fluid DE (PFDE) then the mimetic model predicts the same power spectrum of the Newtonian potential as the PFDE model with zero sound speed. In particular, if the background is chosen to be the same as that of LCDM, then also in this case the power spectrum of the Newtonian potential in the mimetic model becomes indistinguishable from the power spectrum in LCDM on linear scales. A different conclusion may be found in the case of non-adiabatic perturbations. We also discuss the distinguishability, using power spectrum measurements from LCDM N-body simulations as a proxy for future observations, between these mimetic models and other popular models of DE. For instance, we find that if the background has an equation of state equal to -0.95 then we will be able to distinguish the mimetic model from the PFDE model with unity sound speed. On the other hand, it will be hard to do this distinction with respect to the LCDM model.
  • We reconstruct the two-dimensional (2D) matter distributions in 20 high-mass galaxy clusters selected from the CLASH survey, by using the new approach of performing a joint weak lensing analysis of 2D shear and azimuthally averaged magnification measurements. This combination allows for a complete analysis of the field, effectively breaking the mass-sheet degeneracy. In a Bayesian framework, we simultaneously constrain the mass profile and morphology of each individual cluster assuming an elliptical Navarro-Frenk-White halo characterized by the mass, concentration, projected axis ratio, and position angle of the projected major axis.. We find that spherical mass estimates of the clusters from azimuthally averaged weak-lensing measurements in previous work are in excellent agreement with our results from a full 2D analysis. Combining all 20 clusters in our sample, we detect the elliptical shape of weak-lensing halos at the $5\sigma$ significance level within a scale of 2Mpc$/h$. The median projected axis ratio is $0.67\pm 0.07$ at a virial mass of $M_\mathrm{vir}=(15.2\pm 2.8) \times 10^{14} M_\odot$, which is in agreement with theoretical predictions of the standard collisionless cold dark matter model. We also study misalignment statistics of brightest cluster galaxy, X-ray, thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, and strong-lensing morphologies with respect to the weak-lensing signal. Among the three baryonic tracers studied here, we find that the X-ray morphology is best aligned with the weak-lensing mass distribution, with a median misalignment angle of $21\pm 7$ degrees. We also conduct a stacked quadrupole shear analysis assuming that the X-ray major axis is aligned with that of the projected mass distribution. This yields a consistent axis ratio of $0.67\pm 0.10$, suggesting again a tight alignment between the intracluster gas and dark matter.
  • Intrinsic alignments (IA), the coherent alignment of intrinsic galaxy orientations, can be a source of a systematic error of weak lensing surveys. The redshift evolution of IA also contains information about the physics of galaxy formation and evolution. This paper presents the first measurement of IA at high redshift, $z\sim 1.4$, using the spectroscopic catalog of blue star-forming galaxies of the FastSound redshift survey, with the galaxy shape information from the Canada-Hawaii-France telescope lensing survey. The IA signal is consistent with zero with power-law amplitudes fitted to the projected correlation functions for density-shape and shape-shape correlation components, $A_{\delta+}=-0.0071\pm 0.1340$ and $A_{++}=-0.0505\pm 0.0848$, respectively. These results are consistent with those obtained from blue galaxies at lower redshifts (e.g., $A_{\delta+}=0.0035_{-0.0389}^{+0.0387}$ and $A_{++}=0.0045_{-0.0168}^{+0.0166}$ at $z=0.51$ from the WiggleZ survey). The upper limit of the constrained IA amplitude corresponds to a few percent contamination to the weak-lensing shear power spectrum, resulting in systematic uncertainties on the cosmological parameter estimations by $-0.052<\Delta \sigma_8<0.039$ and $-0.039<\Delta \Omega_m<0.030$.
  • We study the dependence of surface mass density profiles, which can be directly measured by weak gravitational lensing, on the orientation of haloes with respect to the line-of-sight direction, using a suite of $N$-body simulations. We find that, when major axes of haloes are aligned with the line-of-sight direction, surface mass density profiles have higher amplitudes than those averaged over all halo orientations, over all scales from $0.1$ to $100\,\mathrm{Mpc}/h$ we studied. While the orientation dependence at small scales is ascribed to the halo triaxiality, our results indicate even stronger orientation dependence in the so-called two-halo regime, up to $100\,\mathrm{Mpc}/h$. The orientation dependence for the two-halo term is well approximated by a multiplicative shift of the amplitude and therefore a shift in the halo bias parameter value. The halo bias from the two-halo term can be overestimated or underestimated by up to $\sim 30 \%$ depending on the viewing angle, which translates into the bias in estimated halo masses by up to a factor of two from halo bias measurements. The orientation dependence at large scales originates from the anisotropic halo-matter correlation function, which has an elliptical shape with the axis ratio of $\sim 0.55$ up to $100\, \mathrm{Mpc}/h$. We discuss potential impacts of halo orientation bias on other observables such as optically selected cluster samples and a clustering analysis of large-scale structure tracers such as quasars.
  • We present the measurement of the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect in Fourier space, rather than in real space. We measure the density-weighted pairwise kSZ power spectrum, the first use of this promising approach, by cross-correlating a cleaned Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature map, which jointly uses both Planck Release 2 and Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe nine-year data, with the two galaxy samples, CMASS and LOWZ, derived fr om the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 12. With the current data, we constrain the average optical depth $\tau$ multiplied by the ratio of the Hubble parameter at redshift $z$ and the present day, $E=H/H_0$; we find $\tau E = (3.95\pm1.62)\times10^{-5}$ for LOWZ and $\tau E = ( 1.25\pm 1.06)\times10^{-5}$ for CMASS, with the optimal angular radius of an aperture photometry filter to estimate the CMB temperature distortion associ ated with each galaxy. By repeating the pairwise kSZ power analysis for various aperture radii, we measure the optical depth as a function of aperture ra dii. While this analysis results in the kSZ signals with only evidence for a detection, ${\rm S/N}=2.54$ for LOWZ and $1.24$ for CMASS, the combination of future CMB and spectroscopic galaxy surveys should enable precision measurements. We estimate that the combination of CMB-S4 and data from DESI shoul d yield detections of the kSZ signal with ${\rm S/N}=70-100$, depending on the resolution of CMB-S4.
  • We review three distance measurement techniques beyond the local universe: (1) gravitational lens time delays, (2) baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO), and (3) HI intensity mapping. We describe the principles and theory behind each method, the ingredients needed for measuring such distances, the current observational results, and future prospects. Time delays from strongly lensed quasars currently provide constraints on $H_0$ with < 4% uncertainty, and with 1% within reach from ongoing surveys and efforts. Recent exciting discoveries of strongly lensed supernovae hold great promise for time-delay cosmography. BAO features have been detected in redshift surveys up to z <~ 0.8 with galaxies and z ~ 2 with Ly-$\alpha$ forest, providing precise distance measurements and $H_0$ with < 2% uncertainty in flat $\Lambda$CDM. Future BAO surveys will probe the distance scale with percent-level precision. HI intensity mapping has great potential to map BAO distances at z ~ 0.8 and beyond with precisions of a few percent. The next years ahead will be exciting as various cosmological probes reach 1% uncertainty in determining $H_0$, to assess the current tension in $H_0$ measurements that could indicate new physics.
  • We investigate the effects of intrinsic alignments (IA) of dark-matter halo shapes on cosmic density and velocity fields from cluster to cosmic scales beyond 100 Mpc/h. Besides the density correlation function binned by the halo orientation angle which was used in the literature, we introduce, for the first time, the corresponding two velocity statistics, the angle-binned pairwise infall momentum and momentum correlation function. Using large-volume, high-resolution N-body simulations, we measure the alignment statistics of density and velocity, both in real and redshift space. We find that the alignment signal is not amplified by redshift-space distortions at linear scales. Behaviors of IA in the velocity statistics are similar to those in the density statistics, except that the halo orientations are aligned with the velocity field up to a scale larger than those with the density field, x>100 Mpc/h. On halo scales, x~ R_{200m} ~ 1 Mpc/h, we detect a sharp steepening in the momentum correlation associated with the physical halo boundary, or the splashback feature, which is found more prominent than in the density correlation. Our results indicate that observations of IA with the velocity field can provide additional information on cosmological models from large scales and on physical sizes of halos from small scales.
  • We measure statistically anisotropic signatures imprinted in three-dimensional galaxy clustering using bipolar spherical harmonics (BipoSHs) in both Fourier space and configuration space. We then constrain a well-known quadrupolar anisotropy parameter $g_{2M}$ in the primordial power spectrum, parametrized by $P(\vec{k}) = \bar{P}(k) [ 1 + \sum_{M} g_{2M} Y_{2M}(\hat{k}) ]$, with $M$ determining the direction of the anisotropy. Such an anisotropic signal is easily contaminated by artificial asymmetries due to specific survey geometry. We precisely estimate the contaminated signal and finally subtract it from the data. Using the galaxy samples obtained by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12, we find no evidence for violation of statistical isotropy, $g_{2M}$ for all $M$ to be of zero within the $2\sigma$ level. The $g_{2M}$-type anisotropy can originate from the primordial curvature power spectrum involving a directional-dependent modulation $g_* (\hat{k} \cdot \hat{p})^2$. The bound on $g_{2M}$ is translated into $g_*$ as $-0.09 < g_* < 0.08$ with a $95\%$ confidence level when $\hat{p}$ is marginalized over.
  • The peculiar velocity field measured by redshift-space distortions (RSD) in galaxy surveys provides a unique probe of the growth of large-scale structure. However, systematic effects arise when including satellite galaxies in the clustering analysis. Since satellite galaxies tend to reside in massive halos with a greater halo bias, the inclusion boosts the clustering power. In addition, virial motions of the satellite galaxies cause a significant suppression of the clustering power due to nonlinear RSD effects. We develop a novel method to recover the redshift-space power spectrum of halos from the observed galaxy distribution by minimizing the contamination of satellite galaxies. The cylinder grouping method (CGM) we study effectively excludes satellite galaxies from a galaxy sample. However, we find that this technique produces apparent anisotropies in the reconstructed halo distribution over all the scales which mimic RSD. On small scales, the apparent anisotropic clustering is caused by exclusion of halos within the anisotropic cylinder used by the CGM. On large scales, the misidentification of different halos in the large-scale structures, aligned along the line-of-sight, into the same CGM group, causes the apparent anisotropic clustering via their cross-correlation with the CGM halos. We construct an empirical model for the CGM halo power spectrum, which includes correction terms derived using the CGM window function at small scales as well as the linear matter power spectrum multiplied by a simple anisotropic function at large scales. We apply this model to a mock galaxy catalog at z=0.5, designed to resemble SDSS-III BOSS CMASS galaxies, and find that our model can predict both the monopole and quadrupole power spectra of the host halos up to k<0.5 h/Mpc to within 5%.
  • We propose an efficient way to test rotational invariance in the cosmological perturbations by use of galaxy correlation functions. In symmetry-breaking cases, the galaxy power spectrum can have extra angular dependence in addition to the usual one due to the redshift-space distortion, $ \hat{k} \cdot \hat{n}$. We confirm that, via the decomposition into not the usual Legendre basis ${\cal L}_\ell(\hat{k} \cdot \hat{n})$ but the bipolar spherical harmonic one $\{Y_{\ell}(\hat{k}) \otimes Y_{\ell'}(\hat{n})\}_{LM}$, the symmetry-breaking signal can be completely distinguished from the usual isotropic one since the former yields nonvanishing $L \geq 1$ modes but the latter is confined to the $L = 0$ one. As a demonstration, we analyze the signatures due to primordial-origin symmetry breakings such as the well-known quadrupolar-type and dipolar-type power asymmetries and find nonzero $L = 2$ and $1$ modes, respectively. Fisher matrix forecasts of their constraints indicate that the $Planck$-level sensitivity could be achieved by the SDSS or BOSS-CMASS data, and an order-of-magnitude improvement is expected in a near future survey as PFS or Euclid by virtue of an increase in accessible Fourier mode. Our methodology is model-independent and hence applicable to the searches for various types of statistically anisotropic fluctuations.
  • Yes. Future CMB experiments such as Advanced ACTPol and CMB-S4 should achieve measurements with S/N of $> 0.1$ for the typical galaxies in redshift surveys. These measurements will provide complementary measurements of the growth rate of large scale structure $f$ and the expansion rate of the Universe $H$ to galaxy clustering measurements. This paper emphasizes that there is significant information in the anisotropy of the relative pairwise kSZ measurements. We expand the relative pairwise kSZ power spectrum in Legendre polynomials and consider up to its octopole. Assuming that the noise in the filtered maps is uncorrelated between the positions of galaxies in the survey, we derive a simple analytic form for the power spectrum covariance of the relative pairwise kSZ temperature in redshift space. While many previous studies have assumed optimistically that the optical depth of the galaxies $\tau_{\rm T}$ in the survey is known, we marginalize over $\tau_{\rm T}$, to compute constraints on the growth rate $f$ and the expansion rate $H$. For realistic sure parameters, we find that combining kSZ and galaxy redshift survey data reduces the marginalized $1$-$\sigma$ errors on $H$ and $f$ by $\sim50$-$70\%$ compared to the galaxy-only analysis.
  • We present basic properties of $\sim$3,300 emission line galaxies detected by the FastSound survey, which are mostly H$\alpha$ emitters at $z \sim$ 1.2-1.5 in the total area of about 20 deg$^2$, with the H$\alpha$ flux sensitivity limit of $\sim 1.6 \times 10^{-16} \rm erg \ cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ at 4.5 sigma. This paper presents the catalogs of the FastSound emission lines and galaxies, which will be open to the public in the near future. We also present basic properties of typical FastSound H$\alpha$ emitters, which have H$\alpha$ luminosities of $10^{41.8}$-$10^{43.3}$ erg/s, SFRs of 20--500 $M_\odot$/yr, and stellar masses of $10^{10.0}$--$10^{11.3}$ $M_\odot$. The 3D distribution maps for the four fields of CFHTLS W1--4 are presented, clearly showing large scale clustering of galaxies at the scale of $\sim$ 100--600 comoving Mpc. Based on 1,105 galaxies with detections of multiple emission lines, we estimate that contamination of non-H$\alpha$ lines is about 4% in the single-line emission galaxies, which are mostly [OIII]$\lambda$5007. This contamination fraction is also confirmed by the stacked spectrum of all the FastSound spectra, in which H$\alpha$, [NII]$\lambda \lambda$6548,6583, [SII]$\lambda \lambda$6717, 6731, and [OI]$\lambda \lambda$6300,6364 are seen.
  • We measure the redshift-space correlation function from a spectroscopic sample of 2783 emission line galaxies from the FastSound survey. The survey, which uses the Subaru Telescope and covers the redshift ranges of $1.19<z<1.55$, is the first cosmological study at such high redshifts. We detect clear anisotropy due to redshift-space distortions (RSD) both in the correlation function as a function of separations parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight and its quadrupole moment. RSD has been extensively used to test general relativity on cosmological scales at $z<1$. Adopting a LCDM cosmology with the fixed expansion history and no velocity dispersion $\sigma_{\rm v}=0$, and using the RSD measurements on scales above 8Mpc/h, we obtain the first constraint on the growth rate at the redshift, $f(z)\sigma_8(z)=0.482\pm 0.116$ at $z\sim 1.4$ after marginalizing over the galaxy bias parameter $b(z)\sigma_8(z)$. This corresponds to $4.2\sigma$ detection of RSD. Our constraint is consistent with the prediction of general relativity $f\sigma_8\sim 0.392$ within the $1-\sigma$ confidence level. When we allow $\sigma_{\rm v}$ to vary and marginalize it over, the growth rate constraint becomes $f\sigma_8=0.494^{+0.126}_{-0.120}$. We also demonstrate that by combining with the low-z constraints on $f\sigma_8$, high-z galaxy surveys like the FastSound can be useful to distinguish modified gravity models without relying on CMB anisotropy experiments.
  • Observations of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect measure the density-weighted velocity field, a potentially powerful cosmological probe. This paper presents an analytical method to predict the power spectrum and two-point correlation function of the density-weighted velocity in redshift space, the direct observables in kSZ surveys. We show a simple relation between the density power spectrum and the density-weighted velocity power spectrum that holds for both dark matter and halos. Using this relation, we can then extend familiar perturbation expansion techniques to the kSZ power spectrum. One of the most important features of density-weighted velocity statistics in redshift space is the change in sign of the cross-correlation between the density and density-weighted velocity at mildly small scales due to nonlinear redshift space distortions. Our model can explain this characteristic feature without any free parameters. As a result, our results can precisely predict the non-linear behavior of the density-weighted velocity field in redshift space up to $\sim30\ h^{-1} {\rm Mpc}$ for dark matter particles at the redshifts of $z=0.0$, $0.5$, and $1.0$.
  • Theoretical modeling of the redshift-space power spectrum of galaxies is crucially important to correctly extract cosmological information from redshift surveys. The task is complicated by the nonlinear biasing and redshift space distortion effects, which change with halo mass, and by the wide distribution of halo masses and their occupations by galaxies. One of the main modeling challenges is the existence of satellite galaxies that have both radial distribution and large virial velocities inside halos, a phenomenon known as the Finger-of-God effect. We present a model for the galaxy power spectrum of in which we decompose a given galaxy sample into central and satellite galaxies and relate different contributions to 1- and 2-halo terms in a halo model. Our primary goal is to ensure that any parameters that we introduce have physically meaningful values, and are not just fitting parameters. For the 2-halo terms we use the previously developed RSD modeling of halos in the context of distribution function and perturbation theory approach. This term needs to be multiplied by the effect of radial distances and velocities of satellites inside the halo. To this one needs to add the 1-halo terms, which are non-perturbative. We show that the real space 1-halo terms can be modeled as almost constant, with the finite extent of the satellites inside the halo inducing a small k^2R^2 term, where R is related to the size of the halo. We adopt a similar model for FoG in redshift space, ensuring that FoG velocity dispersion is related to the halo mass. For FoG k^2 type expansions do not work and FoG resummation must be used instead. We test several damping functions to model the velocity dispersion FoG effect. Applying the formalism to mock galaxies modeled after the "CMASS" sample of the BOSS survey, we find that our predictions for the redshift-space power spectra are accurate up to k~0.4Mpc/h.
  • We analyse the clustering of cosmic large scale structure using a consistent modified gravity perturbation theory, accounting for anisotropic effects along and transverse to the line of sight. The growth factor has a particular scale dependence in f(R) gravity and we fit for the shape parameter f_{R0} simultaneously with the distance and the large scale (general relativity) limit of the growth function. Using more than 690,000 galaxies in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopy Survey Data Release 11, we find no evidence for extra scale dependence, with the 95\% confidence upper limit |f_{R0}| <8 \times 10^{-4}. Future clustering data, such as from the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, can use this consistent methodology to impose tighter constraints.
  • FastSound is a galaxy redshift survey using the near-infrared Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph (FMOS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope, targeting H$\alpha$ emitters at $z \sim 1.18$--$1.54$ down to the sensitivity limit of H$\alpha$ flux $\sim 2 \times 10^{-16} \ \rm erg \ cm^{-2} s^{-1}$. The primary goal of the survey is to detect redshift space distortions (RSD), to test General Relativity by measuring the growth rate of large scale structure and to constrain modified gravity models for the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. The target galaxies were selected based on photometric redshifts and H$\alpha$ flux estimates calculated by fitting spectral energy distribution (SED) models to the five optical magnitudes of the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) Wide catalog. The survey started in March 2012, and all the observations were completed in July 2014. In total, we achieved $121$ pointings of FMOS (each pointing has a $30$ arcmin diameter circular footprint) covering $20.6$ deg$^2$ by tiling the four fields of the CFHTLS Wide in a hexagonal pattern. Emission lines were detected from $\sim 4,000$ star forming galaxies by an automatic line detection algorithm applied to 2D spectral images. This is the first in a series of papers based on FastSound data, and we describe the details of the survey design, target selection, observations, data reduction, and emission line detections.
  • We analyze the clustering of large scale structure in the Universe in a model independent method, accounting for anisotropic effects along and transverse to the line of sight. The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopy Survey Data Release 11 provides a large sample of 690,000 galaxies, allowing determination of the Hubble expansion H, angular distance D_A, and growth rate G_T at an effective redshift of z=0.57. After careful bias and convergence studies of the effects from small scale clustering, we find that cutting transverse separations below 40 Mpc/h delivers robust results while smaller scale data leads to a bias due to unmodelled nonlinear and velocity effects. The converged results are in agreement with concordance LCDM cosmology, general relativity, and minimal neutrino mass, all within the 68% confidence level. We also present results separately for the northern and southern hemisphere sky, finding a slight tension in the growth rate -- potentially a signature of anisotropic stress, or just covariance with small scale velocities -- but within 68% CL.
  • Direct measurements of peculiar velocities of galaxies and clusters of galaxies can in principle provide explicit information on the three dimensional mass distribution, but this information is modulated by the fact that velocity field is sampled at galaxy positions, and is thus probing galaxy momentum. We derive expressions for the cross power spectrum between the density and momentum field and the auto spectrum of the momentum field in redshift space, by extending the distribution function method to these statistics. The resulting momentum cross and auto power spectra in redshift space are expressed as infinite sums over velocity moment correlators in real space, as is the case for the density power spectrum in redshift space. We compute each correlator using Eulerian perturbation theory (PT) and halo biasing model and compare the resulting redshift-space velocity statistics to those measured from N-body simulations for both dark matter and halos. We find that in redshift space linear theory predictions for the density-momentum cross power spectrum as well as for the momentum auto spectrum fail to predict the N-body results at very large scales. On the other hand, our nonlinear PT prediction for these velocity statistics, together with real-space power spectrum for dark matter from simulations, improves the accuracy for both dark matter and halos. We also present the same analysis in configuration space, computing the redshift-space pairwise mean infall velocities and velocity correlation function and compare to nonlinear PT.
  • We examine the signature of dynamic (redshift-space) distortions and geometric distortions (including the Alcock-Paczynski effect) in the context of the galaxy power spectrum measured in upcoming galaxy redshift surveys. Information comes from both the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature and the broadband power spectrum shape. Accurate modeling is required to extract this information without introducing systematic biases in the result. We consider an analytic model for the power spectrum of dark matter halos in redshift space, based on the distribution function expansion, and compare with halo clustering measured in N-body simulations. We forecast that the distribution function model is sufficiently accurate to allow the inclusion of broadband information on scales down to k~0.2 h/Mpc, with somewhat better accuracy for higher bias halos. Compared with a BAO-only analysis with reconstruction, including broadband shape information can improve unbiased constraints on distance measures H(z) and D_A(z) by ~30% and 20%, respectively, for a galaxy sample similar to the DESI luminous red galaxies. The gains in precision are larger in the absence of BAO reconstruction. Furthermore, including broadband shape information allows the measurement of structure growth, through redshift-space distortions. For the same galaxy sample, the distribution function model is able to constrain f*sigma_8 to ~2%, when simultaneously fitting for H(z) and D_A(z). We discuss techniques to optimize the analysis of the power spectrum, including removing modes near the line-of-sight that are particularly challenging to model, and whether these approaches can improve parameter constraints. We find that such techniques are unlikely to significantly improve constraints on geometry, although they may allow higher precision measurements of redshift-space distortions.
  • Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), known as one of the largest cosmological objects, is now recognized as standard cosmological tool to measure geometric distances via the Alcock-Paczynski effect, by which the observed BAO exhibits characteristic anisotropies in addition to the redshift distortions. This implies that once we know the correct distances to the observed BAO, the tip points of baryon acoustic peaks in the anisotropic correlation function of galaxies, $\xi(\sigma,\pi)$, can form a great circle (hereafter 2D BAO circle) in the $\sigma$ and $\pi$ plane, where $\sigma$ and $\pi$ are the separation of galaxy pair parallel and perpendicular to the line-of-sight, respectively. This 2D BAO circle remains unchanged under the variations of the unknown galaxy bias and/or coherent motion, while it varies transversely and radially with respect to the variations of $D_A$ and $H^{-1}$, respectively. Hereby the ratio between transverse distance $D_A$ and the radial distance $H^{-1}$ reproduces the intrinsic shape of 2D BAO circle, which is {\it a priori} given by the known broadband shape of spectra. All BAO peaks of $\xi(\sigma,\pi)$ are precisely calculated with the improved theoretical model of redshift distortion. We test this broadband Alcock--Paczynski method using BOSS--like mock catalogues. The transverse and radial distances are probed in precision of several percentage fractional errors, and the coherent motion is observed to match with the fiducial values accurately.
  • Our observations of the Universe are fundamentally anisotropic, with data from galaxies separated transverse to the line of sight coming from the same epoch while that from galaxies separated parallel to the line of sight coming from different times. Moreover, galaxy velocities along the line of sight change their redshift, giving redshift space distortions. We perform a full two-dimensional anisotropy analysis of galaxy clustering data, fitting in a substantially model independent manner the angular diameter distance D_A, Hubble parameter H, and growth rate ddelta/dln a without assuming a dark energy model. The results demonstrate consistency with LCDM expansion and growth, hence also testing general relativity. We also point out the interpretation dependence of the effective redshift z_eff, and its cosmological impact for next generation surveys.
  • Numerical simulations show that redshift space distortions (RSD) introduce strong scale dependence in the power spectra of halos, with ten percent deviations relative to linear theory predictions even on relatively large scales (k<0.1h/Mpc) and even in the absence of satellites (which induce Fingers-of-God, FoG, effects). If unmodeled these effects prevent one from extracting cosmological information from RSD surveys. In this paper we use perturbation theory (PT) and halo biasing model and apply it to the distribution function approach to RSD, in which RSD is decomposed into several correlators of density weighted velocity moments. We model each of these correlators using PT and compare the results to simulations over a wide range of halo masses and redshifts. We find that with an introduction of a physically motivated halo biasing, and using dark matter power spectra from simulations, we can reproduce the simulation results at a percent level on scales up to k~0.15h/Mpc at z=0, without the need to have free FoG parameters in the model.
  • We develop a perturbative approach to redshift space distortions (RSD) using the phase space distribution function approach and apply it to the dark matter redshift space power spectrum and its moments. RSD can be written as a sum over density weighted velocity moments correlators, with the lowest order being density, momentum density and stress energy density. We use standard and extended perturbation theory (PT) to determine their auto and cross correlators, comparing them to N-body simulations. We show which of the terms can be modeled well with the standard PT and which need additional terms that include higher order corrections which cannot be modeled in PT. Most of these additional terms are related to the small scale velocity dispersion effects, the so called finger of god (FoG) effects, which affect some, but not all, of the terms in this expansion, and which can be approximately modeled using a simple physically motivated ansatz such as the halo model. We point out that there are several velocity dispersions that enter into the detailed RSD analysis with very different amplitudes, which can be approximately predicted by the halo model. In contrast to previous models our approach systematically includes all of the terms at a given order in PT and provides a physical interpretation for the small scale dispersion values. We investigate RSD power spectrum as a function of \mu, the cosine of the angle between the Fourier mode and line of sight, focusing on the lowest order powers of \mu and multipole moments which dominate the observable RSD power spectrum. Overall we find considerable success in modeling many, but not all, of the terms in this expansion.
  • It was recently shown that the power spectrum in redshift space can be written as a sum of cross-power spectra between number weighted velocity moments. We investigate the properties of these power spectra for simulated galaxies and dark matter halos and compare them to the dark matter power spectra, generalizing the concept of the bias. Because all of the quantities are number weighted this approach is well defined even for sparse systems such as massive halos, in contrasts to the previous approaches to RSD where velocity correlations have been explored. We find that the number density weighting leads to a strong scale dependence of the bias terms for momentum density auto-correlation and cross-correlation with density. This trend becomes more significant for the more biased halos and leads to an enhancement of RSD power relative to the linear theory. Fingers-of-god effects, which in this formalism come from the correlations of the higher order moments beyond the momentum density, lead to smoothing of the power spectrum and can reduce this enhancement of power, but are relatively small for halos with no small-scale velocity dispersion. In comparison, for a more realistic galaxy sample with satellites the velocity dispersion generated by satellite motions inside the halos leads to a larger power suppression on small scales, but this depends on the satellite fraction. We investigate several statistics such as the two-dimensional power spectrum, its multipole moments, its powers of mu^2, and configuration space statistics. Overall we find that the nonlinear effects in realistic galaxy samples such as luminous red galaxies affect the redshift space clustering on very large scales: for example, the quadrupole moment is affected by 10% for k<0.1h/mpc, which means that these effects need to be understood if we want to extract cosmological information from the redshift space distortions.