• We present a novel approach for creating science-ready catalogs through a software infrastructure developed for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We integrate the data products released by the DES Data Management and additional products created by the DES collaboration in an environment known as DES Science Portal. Each step involved in the creation of a science-ready catalog is recorded in a relational database and can be recovered at any time. We describe how the DES Science Portal automates the creation and characterization of lightweight catalogs for DES Year 1 Annual Release, and show its flexibility in creating multiple catalogs with different inputs and configurations. Finally, we discuss the advantages of this infrastructure for large surveys such as DES and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. The capability of creating science-ready catalogs efficiently and with full control of the inputs and configurations used is an important asset for supporting science analysis using data from large astronomical surveys.
  • [Abridged] Indirect detection of dark matter (DM) by multi-wavelength astronomical observations provides a promising avenue for probing the particle nature of DM. In the case of DM consisting of Weakly-Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), self-annihilation ultimately produces observable products including $e^{\pm}$ pairs and gamma rays. The gamma rays can be detected directly, while the $e^{\pm}$ pairs can be detected by radio emission from synchrotron radiation or X-rays and soft gamma rays from inverse Compton scattering. An intriguing region to search for astrophysical signs of DM is the Galactic center (GC) of the Milky Way, due in part to an observed excess of gamma-rays that could be DM. A recent observation by the Fermi-LAT collaboration of a similar excess in the central region of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) leads us to explore the possibility of a DM-induced signal there as well. We use the RX-DMFIT tool to perform a multi-frequency analysis of potential DM annihilation emissions in M31. We consider WIMP models consistent with the GC excess and calculate the expected emission across the electromagnetic spectrum in comparison with available observational data from M31. We find that the particle models that best fit the M31 excess favor lower masses than the GC excess. The best fitting models are for a $b\bar{b}$ final state with $M_{\chi}=11$ GeV and $\left<\sigma v\right>=2.26\times 10^{-26}$ cm$^3$s$^{-1}$, as well as an evenly mixed $b\bar{b}/\tau^+\tau^-$ final state with $M_{\chi}=5.8$ GeV and $\left<\sigma v\right>=2.03\times 10^{-26}$ cm$^3$s$^{-1}$. For conservative estimates of the diffusion and magnetic field models the expected radio emissions appear to be in tension with currently available data in the central region of M31, although this constraint has a fairly strong dependence on the values chosen for parameters describing the magnetic field strength and geometry.
  • Dark matter (DM) particles are predicted by several well motivated models to yield Standard Model particles through self-annihilation that can potentially be detected by astrophysical observations. In particular, the production of charged particles from DM annihilation in astrophysical systems that contain magnetic fields yields radio emission through synchrotron radiation and X-ray emission through inverse Compton scattering of ambient photons. We introduce RX-DMFIT, a tool used for calculating the expected secondary emission from DM annihilation. RX-DMFIT includes a wide range of customizable astrophysical and particle parameters and incorporates important astrophysics including the diffusion of charged particles, relevant radiative energy losses, and magnetic field modelling. We demonstrate the use and versatility of RX-DMFIT by analyzing the potential radio and X-ray signals for a variety of DM particle models and astrophysical environments including galaxy clusters, dwarf spheroidal galaxies and normal galaxies. We then apply RX-DMFIT to a concrete example using Segue I radio data to place constraints for a range of assumed DM annihilation channels. For WIMP models with $M_{\chi} \leq 100$ GeV and assuming weak diffusion, we find that the the leptonic $\mu^+\mu^-$ and $\tau^+\tau^-$ final states provide the strongest constraints, placing limits on the DM particle cross-section well below the thermal relic cross-section, while even for the $b\bar{b}$ channel we find limits close to the thermal relic cross-section. Our analysis shows that radio emission provides a highly competitive avenue for dark matter searches.
  • We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion--temperature ($\sigma_{\rm v}$--$T_{\rm X}$) relation up to $z = 1$ using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the \textit{XMM} Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 $z > 0.5$ clusters observed with the GMOS instruments on the Gemini telescopes. Using an orthogonal regression method, we find that the slope of the relation is steeper than that expected if clusters were self-similar, and that the evolution of the normalisation is slightly negative, but not significantly different from zero ($\sigma_{\rm v} \propto T^{0.86 \pm 0.14} E(z)^{-0.37 \pm 0.33}$). We verify our results by applying our methods to cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The lack of evolution seen in our data is consistent with simulations that include both feedback and radiative cooling.
  • Deep optical images are often crowded with overlapping objects. This is especially true in the cores of galaxy clusters, where images of dozens of galaxies may lie atop one another. Accurate measurements of cluster properties require deblending algorithms designed to automatically extract a list of individual objects and decide what fraction of the light in each pixel comes from each object. We present new software called the Gradient And INterpolation based deblender (GAIN) as a secondary deblender to improve deblending the images of cluster cores. This software relies on using image intensity gradient and using an image interpolation technique usually used to correct flawed terrestrial digital images. We test this software on Dark Energy Survey coadd images. GAIN helps extracting unbiased photometry measurement for blended sources. It also helps improving detection completeness while introducing only a modest amount of spurious detections. For example, when applied to deep images simulated with high level of deblending difficulties, this software improves detection completeness from 91% to 97% for sources above the 10? limiting magnitude at 25.3 mag. We expect this software to be a useful tool for cluster population measurements.
  • Using data from the All Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS) we statistically detect the extended X-ray emission in the interstellar medium (ISM)/intra-cluster medium (ICM) in both active and normal galaxies at 0.3 <= z <= 1.3. For both active galactic nuclei (AGN) host galaxy and normal galaxy samples that are matched in restframe color, luminosity, and redshift distribution, we tentatively detect excess X-ray emission at scales of 1--10 arcsec at a few sigma significance in the surface brightness profiles. The exact significance of this detection is sensitive to the true characterization of Chandra's point spread function. The observed excess in the surface brightness profiles is suggestive of lower extended emission in AGN hosts compared to normal galaxies. This is qualitatively similar to theoretical predictions of the X-ray surface brightness profile from AGN feedback models, where feedback from AGN is likely to evacuate the gas from the center of the galaxy/cluster. We propose that AGN that are intrinsically under-luminous in X-rays, but have equivalent bolometric luminosities to our sources will be the ideal sample to study more robustly the effect of AGN feedback on diffuse ISM/ICM gas.
  • Using data from the DEEP2 galaxy redshift survey and the All Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey we obtain stacked X-ray maps of galaxies at 0.7 < z < 1.0 as a function of stellar mass. We compute the total X-ray counts of these galaxies and show that in the soft band (0.5--2,kev) there exists a significant correlation between galaxy X-ray counts and stellar mass at these redshifts. The best-fit relation between X-ray counts and stellar mass can be characterized by a power law with a slope of 0.58 +/- 0.1. We do not find any correlation between stellar mass and X-ray luminosities in the hard (2--7,kev) and ultra-hard (4--7,kev) bands. The derived hardness ratios of our galaxies suggest that the X-ray emission is degenerate between two spectral models, namely point-like power-law emission and extended plasma emission in the interstellar medium. This is similar to what has been observed in low redshift galaxies. Using a simple spectral model where half of the emission comes from power-law sources and the other half from the extended hot halo we derive the X-ray luminosities of our galaxies. The soft X-ray luminosities of our galaxies lie in the range 10^39-8x10^40, ergs/s. Dividing our galaxy sample by the criteria U-B > 1, we find no evidence that our results for X-ray scaling relations depend on optical color.
  • We test the origin of the 3.5 keV line photons by analyzing the morphology of the emission at that energy from the Galactic Center and from the Perseus cluster of galaxies. We employ a variety of different templates to model the continuum emission and analyze the resulting radial and azimuthal distribution of the residual emission. We then perform a pixel-by-pixel binned likelihood analysis including line emission templates and dark matter templates and assess the correlation of the 3.5 keV emission with these templates. We conclude that the radial and azimuthal distribution of the residual emission is incompatible with a dark matter origin for both the Galactic center and Perseus; the Galactic center 3.5 keV line photons trace the morphology of lines at comparable energy, while the Perseus 3.5 keV photons are highly correlated with the cluster's cool core, and exhibit a morphology incompatible with dark matter decay. The template analysis additionally allows us to set the most stringent constraints to date on lines in the 3.5 keV range from dark matter decay.
  • We respond to two comments on our recent paper, Jeltema & Profumo (2014). The first comment by Boyarsky et al. confirms the absence of a line from M31 in the 3-4 keV energy range, but criticizes the energy range for spectral fitting on the basis that (i) the background model adopted between 3-4 keV is invalid outside that range and that (ii) extending the energy range multiple features appear, including a 3.5 keV line. Point (i) is manifestly irrelevant (the 3-4 keV background model was not meant to extend outside that range), while closer inspection of point (ii) shows that the detected features are inconsistent and likely unphysical. We demonstrate that the existence of an excess near 3.5 keV in the M31 data requires fitting a broad enough energy range such that the background modeling near 3.5 keV is poor to a level that multiple spurious residual features become significant. Bulbul et al. criticize our use of WebGuide instead of the full AtomDB package. While a technically correct remark, this is only a red herring: our predictions are based on line ratios, and not on absolute emissivities; line ratios, for atomic transitions with similar peak temperatures, are largely temperature-independent, thus the line ratios we employed to draw our conclusions are substantially correct. Bulbul et al. also present a new analysis of their data at lower energy, which excludes a significant Cl contamination to the 3.5 keV line. Cl emission was however predicted to be subdominant in our original study. Both of the Bulbul et al.'s criticisms are thus inconsequential to the conclusions of our original study. Finally, we demonstrate that the multi-temperature models employed in Bulbul et al. are, in fact, inconsistent, based on the Ca XX to Ca XIX line ratio: we show that the overestimated cluster plasma temperatures they employ lead to gross underestimates of the K XVIII line emissivity.