• The presence of a weak second-harmonic field in an intense-laser ionization experiment affects the momentum-resolved electron yield, depending on the relative phase between the $\omega$ and the $2\omega$ component. The proposed two-color 'phase-of-the-phase spectroscopy' quantifies for each final electron momentum a relative-phase contrast (RPC) and a 'phase of the phase' (PP), describing how much and with which phase lag, respectively, the yield changes as function of relative phase. Experimental results for RPC and PP spectra for rare gas atoms and CO$_2$ are presented. The spectra demonstrate a rather universal structure that is analyzed with the help of a simple model based on electron trajectories, wave-packet spreading, and (multiple) rescattering. Details in the PP and RPC spectra are target sensitive and thus may be used to extract structural (or even dynamical) information with high accuracy.
  • Two-component nanoplasmas generated by strong-field ionization of doped helium nanodroplets are studied in a pump-probe experiment using few-cycle laser pulses in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. High yields of helium ions and a pronounced, droplet size-dependent resonance structure in the pump-probe transients reveal the evolution of the dopant-induced helium nanoplasma. The pump-probe dynamics is interpreted in terms of strong inner ionization by the pump pulse and resonant heating by the probe pulse which controls the final charge states detected via the frustration of electron-ion recombination.
  • Laser excitation of nanometer-sized atomic and molecular clusters offers various opportunities to explore and control ultrafast many-particle dynamics. Whereas weak laser fields allow the analysis of photoionization, excited-state relaxation, and structural modifications on these finite quantum systems, large-amplitude collective electron motion and Coulomb explosion can be induced with intense laser pulses. This review provides an overview of key phenomena arising from laser-cluster interactions with focus on nonlinear optical excitations and discusses the underlying processes according to the current understanding. A brief general survey covers basic cluster properties and excitation mechanisms relevant for laser-driven cluster dynamics. Then, after an excursion in theoretical and experimental methods, results for single- and multiphoton excitations are reviewed with emphasis on signatures from time- and angular resolved photoemission. A key issue of this review is the broad spectrum of phenomena arising from clusters exposed to strong fields, where the interaction with the laser pulse creates short-lived and dense nanoplasmas. The implications for technical developments include the controlled generation of ion, electron, and radiation pulses, as will be addressed along with corresponding examples. Finally, future prospects of laser-cluster research as well as experimental and theoretical challenges are discussed.
  • Optimal control techniques combined with femtosecond laser pulse shaping are applied to steer and enhance the strong-field induced emission of highly charged atomic ions from silver clusters embedded in helium nanodroplets. With light fields shaped in amplitude and phase we observe a substantial increase of the Ag$^{q+}$ yield for $q>10$ when compared to bandwidth-limited and optimally stretched pulses. A remarkably simple double-pulse structure, containing a low-intensity prepulse and a stronger main pulse, turns out to produce the highest atomic charge states up to Ag$^{20+}$. A negative chirp during the main pulse hints at dynamic frequency locking to the cluster plasmon. A numerical optimal control study on pure silver clusters with a nanoplasma model converges to a similar pulse structure and corroborates, that the optimal light field adapts to the resonant excitation of cluster surface plasmons for efficient ionization.