• Quantum samplers are believed capable of sampling efficiently from distributions that are classically hard to sample from. We consider a sampler inspired by the classical Ising model. It is nonadaptive and therefore experimentally amenable. Under a plausible conjecture, classical sampling upto additive errors from this model is known to be hard. We present a trap-based verification scheme for quantum supremacy that only requires the verifier to prepare single-qubit states. The verification is done on the same model as the original sampler, a square lattice, with only a constant overhead. We next revamp our verification scheme in two distinct ways using fault tolerance that preserves the nonadaptivity. The first has a lower overhead based on error correction with the same threshold as universal quantum computation. The second has a higher overhead but an improved threshold (1.97\%) based on error detection. We show that classically sampling upto additive errors is likely hard in both these schemes. Our results are applicable to other sampling problems such as the Instantaneous Quantum Polynomial-time (IQP) computation model. They should also assist near-term attempts at experimentally demonstrating quantum supremacy and guide long-term ones.
  • We present two verification protocols where the correctness of a "target" computation is checked by means of "trap" computations that can be efficiently simulated on a classical computer. Our protocols rely on a minimal set of noise-free operations (preparation of eight single-qubit states or measurement of four observables, both on a single plane of the Bloch sphere) and achieve linear overhead. To the best of our knowledge, our protocols are the least demanding techniques able to achieve linear overhead. They represent a step towards further reducing the quantum requirements for verification.
  • Quantum computers promise to efficiently solve not only problems believed to be intractable for classical computers, but also problems for which verifying the solution is also considered intractable. This raises the question of how one can check whether quantum computers are indeed producing correct results. This task, known as quantum verification, has been highlighted as a significant challenge on the road to scalable quantum computing technology. We review the most significant approaches to quantum verification and compare them in terms of structure, complexity and required resources. We also comment on the use of cryptographic techniques which, for many of the presented protocols, has proven extremely useful in performing verification. Finally, we discuss issues related to fault tolerance, experimental implementations and the outlook for future protocols.
  • The efficient certification of classically intractable quantum devices has been a central research question for some time. However, to observe a "quantum advantage", it is believed that one does not need to build a large scale universal quantum computer, a task which has proven extremely challenging. Intermediate quantum models that are easier to implement, but which also exhibit this quantum advantage over classical computers, have been proposed. In this work, we present a certification technique for such a sub-universal quantum server which only performs commuting gates and requires very limited quantum memory. By allowing a verifying client to manipulate single qubits, we exploit properties of measurement based blind quantum computing to give them the tools to test the "quantum superiority" of the server.
  • We propose a new composable and information-theoretically secure protocol to verify that a server has the power to sample from a sub-universal quantum machine implementing only commuting gates. By allowing the client to manipulate single qubits, we exploit properties of Measurement based Blind Quantum Computing to prove security against a malicious Server and therefore certify quantum supremacy without the need for a universal quantum computer.
  • In the absence of any efficient classical schemes for verifying a universal quantum computer, the importance of limiting the required quantum resources for this task has been highlighted recently. Currently, most of efficient quantum verification protocols are based on cryptographic techniques where an almost classical verifier executes her desired encrypted quantum computation remotely on an untrusted quantum prover. In this work we present a new protocol for quantum verification by incorporating existing techniques in a non-standard composition to reduce the required quantum communications between the verifier and the prover.
  • We present a quantumly-enhanced protocol to achieve unconditionally secure delegated classical computation where the client and the server have both limited classical and quantum computing capacity. We prove the same task cannot be achieved using only classical protocols. This extends the work of Anders and Browne on the computational power of correlations to a security setting. Concretely, we present how a client with access to a non-universal classical gate such as a parity gate could achieve unconditionally secure delegated universal classical computation by exploiting minimal quantum gadgets. In particular, unlike the universal blind quantum computing protocols, the restriction of the task to classical computing removes the need for a full universal quantum machine on the side of the server and makes these new protocols readily implementable with the currently available quantum technology in the lab.
  • While building a universal quantum computer remains challenging, devices of restricted power such as the so-called one pure qubit model have attracted considerable attention. An important step in the construction of these limited quantum computational devices is the understanding of whether the verification of the computation within these models could be also performed in the restricted scheme. Encoding via blindness (a cryptographic protocol for delegated computing) has proven successful for the verification of universal quantum computation with a restricted verifier. In this paper, we present the adaptation of this approach to the one pure qubit model, and present the first feasible scheme for the verification of delegated one pure qubit model of quantum computing.