• We derive stellar population parameters for a representative sample of ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs) and a large sample of massive globular clusters (GCs) with stellar masses $\gtrsim$ 10$^{6}$ $M_{\odot}$ in the central galaxy M87 of the Virgo galaxy cluster, based on model fitting to the Lick-index measurements from both the literature and new observations. After necessary spectral stacking of the relatively faint objects in our initial sample of 40 UCDs and 118 GCs, we obtain 30 sets of Lick-index measurements for UCDs and 80 for GCs. The M87 UCDs have ages $\gtrsim$ 8 Gyr and [$\alpha$/Fe] $\simeq$ 0.4 dex, in agreement with previous studies based on smaller samples. The literature UCDs, located in lower-density environments than M87, extend to younger ages and smaller [$\alpha$/Fe] (at given metallicities) than M87 UCDs, resembling the environmental dependence of the Virgo dE nuclei. The UCDs exhibit a positive mass-metallicity relation (MZR), which flattens and connects compact ellipticals at stellar masses $\gtrsim$ 10$^{8}$ $M_{\odot}$. The Virgo dE nuclei largely follow the average MZR of UCDs, whereas most of the M87 GCs are offset towards higher metallicities for given stellar masses. The difference between the mass-metallicity distributions of UCDs and GCs may be qualitatively understood as a result of their different physical sizes at birth in a self-enrichment scenario or of galactic nuclear cluster star formation efficiency being relatively low in a tidal stripping scenario for UCD formation. The existing observations provide the necessary but not sufficient evidence for tidally stripped dE nuclei being the dominant contributors to the M87 UCDs.
  • Models of the Solar System's dynamical evolution predict the dispersal of primitive planetesimals from their formative regions amongst the gas-giant planets due to the early phases of planetary migration. Consequently, carbonaceous objects were scattered both into the outer asteroid belt and out to the Kuiper Belt. These models predict that the Kuiper Belt should contain a small fraction of objects with carbonaceous surfaces, though to date, all reported visible reflectance spectra of small Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) are linear and featureless. We report the unusual reflectance spectrum of a small KBO, (120216) 2004 EW95, exhibiting a large drop in its near-UV reflectance and a broad shallow optical absorption feature centered at ~700 nm which is detected at greater than 4-sigma significance. These features, confirmed through multiple epochs of spectral photometry and spectroscopy, have respectively been associated with ferric oxides and phyllosilicates. The spectrum bears striking resemblance to those of some C-type asteroids, suggesting that 2004 EW95 may share a common origin with those objects. 2004 EW95 orbits the Sun in a stable mean motion resonance with Neptune, at relatively high eccentricity and inclination, suggesting it may have been emplaced there by some past dynamical instability. These results appear consistent with the aforementioned model predictions and are the first to show a reliably confirmed detection of silicate material on a small KBO.
  • Within scientific and real life problems, classification is a typical case of extremely complex tasks in data-driven scenarios, especially if approached with traditional techniques. Machine Learning supervised and unsupervised paradigms, providing self-adaptive and semi-automatic methods, are able to navigate into large volumes of data characterized by a multi-dimensional parameter space, thus representing an ideal method to disentangle classes of objects in a reliable and efficient way. In Astrophysics, the identification of candidate Globular Clusters through deep, wide-field, single band images, is one of such cases where self-adaptive methods demonstrated a high performance and reliability. Here we experimented some variants of the known Neural Gas model, exploring both supervised and unsupervised paradigms of Machine Learning for the classification of Globular Clusters. Main scope of this work was to verify the possibility to improve the computational efficiency of the methods to solve complex data-driven problems, by exploiting the parallel programming with GPU framework. By using the astrophysical playground, the goal was to scientifically validate such kind of models for further applications extended to other contexts.
  • Substructure in globular cluster (GC) populations around large galaxies is expected in galaxy formation scenarios that involve accretion or merger events, and it has been searched for using direct associations between GCs and structure in the diffuse galaxy light, or with GC kinematics. Here, we present a search for candidate substructures in the GC population around the Virgo cD galaxy M87 through the analysis of the spatial distribution of the GC colors.~The study is based on a sample of $\sim\!1800$ bright GCs with high-quality $u,g,r,i,z,K_s$ photometry, selected to ensure a low contamination by foreground stars or background galaxies.~The spectral energy distributions of the GCs are associated with formal estimates of age and metallicity, which are representative of its position in a 4-D color-space relative to standard single stellar population models.~Dividing the sample into broad bins based on the relative formal ages, we observe inhomogeneities which reveal signatures of GC substructures.~The most significant of these is a spatial overdensity of GCs with relatively young age labels, of diameter $\sim\!0.1$\,deg ($\sim\!30\,$kpc), located to the south of M87.~The significance of this detection is larger than about 5$\sigma$ after accounting for estimates of random and systematic errors.~Surprisingly, no large Virgo galaxy is present in this area, that could potentially host these GCs.~But candidate substructures in the M87 halo with equally elusive hosts have been described based on kinematic studies in the past.~The number of GC spectra available around M87 is currently insufficient to clarify the nature of the new candidate substructure.
  • We present a photometric study of the dwarf galaxy population in the core region ($< r_{\rm vir}/4$) of the Fornax galaxy cluster based on deep $u'g'i'$ photometry from the Next Generation Fornax Cluster Survey. All imaging data were obtained with the Dark Energy Camera mounted on the 4-meter Blanco telescope at the Cerro-Tololo Interamerican Observatory. We identify 258 dwarf galaxy candidates with luminosities $-17 < M_{g'} < -8$ mag, corresponding to typical stellar masses of $9.5\gtrsim \log{\cal M}_{\star}/M_\odot \gtrsim 5.5$, reaching $\sim\!3$ mag deeper in point-source luminosity and $\sim\!4$ mag deeper in surface-brightness sensitivity compared to the classic Fornax Cluster Catalog. Morphological analysis shows that surface-brightness profiles are well represented by single-component S\'ersic models with average S\'ersic indices of $\langle n\rangle_{u',g',i'}=(0.78-0.83) \pm 0.02$, and average effective radii of $\langle r_e\rangle_{u',g',i'}\!=(0.67-0.70) \pm 0.02$ kpc. Color-magnitude relations indicate a flattening of the galaxy red sequence at faint galaxy luminosities, similar to the one recently discovered in the Virgo cluster. A comparison with population synthesis models and the galaxy mass-metallicity relation reveals that the average faint dwarf galaxy is likely older than ~5 Gyr. We study galaxy scaling relations between stellar mass, effective radius, and stellar mass surface density over a stellar mass range covering six orders of magnitude. We find that over the sampled stellar mass range several distinct mechanisms of galaxy mass assembly can be identified: i) dwarf galaxies assemble mass inside the half-mass radius up to $\log{\cal M}_{\star}$ ~8.0, ii) isometric mass assembly in the range $8.0 < \log{\cal M}_{\star}/M_\odot < 10.5$, and iii) massive galaxies assemble stellar mass predominantly in their halos at $\log{\cal M}_{\star}$ ~10.5 and above.
  • In Astrophysics, the identification of candidate Globular Clusters through deep, wide-field, single band HST images, is a typical data analytics problem, where methods based on Machine Learning have revealed a high efficiency and reliability, demonstrating the capability to improve the traditional approaches. Here we experimented some variants of the known Neural Gas model, exploring both supervised and unsupervised paradigms of Machine Learning, on the classification of Globular Clusters, extracted from the NGC1399 HST data. Main focus of this work was to use a well-tested playground to scientifically validate such kind of models for further extended experiments in astrophysics and using other standard Machine Learning methods (for instance Random Forest and Multi Layer Perceptron neural network) for a comparison of performances in terms of purity and completeness.
  • The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will enable revolutionary studies of galaxies, dark matter, and black holes over cosmic time. The LSST Galaxies Science Collaboration has identified a host of preparatory research tasks required to leverage fully the LSST dataset for extragalactic science beyond the study of dark energy. This Galaxies Science Roadmap provides a brief introduction to critical extragalactic science to be conducted ahead of LSST operations, and a detailed list of preparatory science tasks including the motivation, activities, and deliverables associated with each. The Galaxies Science Roadmap will serve as a guiding document for researchers interested in conducting extragalactic science in anticipation of the forthcoming LSST era.
  • We build a background cluster candidate catalog from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey, using our detection algorithm RedGOLD. The NGVS covers 104$deg^2$ of the Virgo cluster in the $u^*,g,r,i,z$-bandpasses to a depth of $ g \sim 25.7$~mag (5$\sigma$). Part of the survey was not covered or has shallow observations in the $r$--band. We build two cluster catalogs: one using all bandpasses, for the fields with deep $r$--band observations ($\sim 20 \ deg^2$), and the other using four bandpasses ($u^*,g,i,z$) for the entire NGVS area. Based on our previous CFHT-LS W1 studies, we estimate that both of our catalogs are $\sim100\%$($\sim70\%$) complete and $\sim80\%$ pure, at $z\le 0.6$($z\lesssim1$), for galaxy clusters with masses of $M\gtrsim10^{14}\ M_{\odot}$. We show that when using four bandpasses, though the photometric redshift accuracy is lower, RedGOLD detects massive galaxy clusters up to $z\sim 1$ with completeness and purity similar to the five-band case. This is achieved when taking into account the bias in the richness estimation, which is $\sim40\%$ lower at $0.5\le z<0.6$ and $\sim20\%$ higher at $0.6<z< 0.8$, with respect to the five-band case. RedGOLD recovers all the X-ray clusters in the area with mass $M_{500} > 1.4 \times 10^{14} \rm M_{\odot}$ and $0.08<z<0.5$. Because of our different cluster richness limits and the NGVS depth, our catalogs reach to lower masses than the published redMaPPer cluster catalog over the area, and we recover $\sim 90-100\%$ of its detections.
  • Large samples of globular clusters (GC) with precise multi-wavelength photometry are becoming increasingly available and can be used to constrain the formation history of galaxies. We present the results of an analysis of Milky Way (MW) and Virgo core GCs based on five optical-near-infrared colors and ten synthetic stellar population models. For the MW GCs, the models tend to agree on photometric ages and metallicities, with values similar to those obtained with previous studies. When used with Virgo core GCs, for which photometry is provided by the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS), the same models generically return younger ages. This is a consequence of the systematic differences observed between the locus occupied by Virgo core GCs and models in panchromatic color space. Only extreme fine-tuning of the adjustable parameters available to us can make the majority of the best-fit ages old. Although we cannot exclude that the formation history of the Virgo core may lead to more conspicuous populations of relatively young GCs than in other environments, we emphasize that the intrinsic properties of the Virgo GCs are likely to differ systematically from those assumed in the models. Thus, the large wavelength coverage and photometric quality of modern GC samples, such as used here, is not by itself sufficient to better constrain the GC formation histories. Models matching the environment-dependent characteristics of GCs in multi-dimensional color space are needed to improve the situation.
  • We compare the existent methods including the minimum spanning tree based method and the local stellar density based method, in measuring mass segregation of star clusters. We find that the minimum spanning tree method reflects more the compactness, which represents the global spatial distribution of massive stars, while the local stellar density method reflects more the crowdedness, which provides the local gravitational potential information. It is suggested to measure the local and the global mass segregation simultaneously. We also develop a hybrid method that takes both aspects into account. This hybrid method balances the local and the global mass segregation in the sense that the predominant one is either caused either by dynamical evolution or purely accidental, especially when such information is unknown a priori. In addition, we test our prescriptions with numerical models and show the impact of binaries in estimating the mass segregation value. As an application, we use these methods on the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) observations and the Taurus cluster. We find that the ONC is significantly mass segregated down to the 20th most massive stars. In contrast, the massive stars of the Taurus cluster are sparsely distributed in many different subclusters, showing a low degree of compactness. The massive stars of Taurus are also found to be distributed in the high-density region of the subclusters, showing significant mass segregation at subcluster scales. Meanwhile, we also apply these methods to discuss the possible mechanisms of the dynamical evolution of the simulated substructured star clusters.
  • A particular population of galaxies have drawn much interest recently, which are as faint as typical dwarf galaxies but have the sizes as large as $L^*$ galaxies, the so called "ultra-diffuse galaxie" (UDGs). The lack of tidal features of UDGs in dense environments suggests that their host halos are perhaps as massive as that of the Milky Way. On the other hand, galaxy formation efficiency should be much higher in the halos of such masses. Here we use the model galaxy catalog generated by populating two large simulations: the Millennium-II cosmological simulation and Phoenix simulations of 9 big clusters with the semi-analytic galaxy formation model. This model reproduces remarkably well the observed properties of UDGs in the nearby clusters, including the abundance, profile, color, and morphology, etc. We search for UDG candidates using the public data and find 2 UDG candidates in our Local Group and 23 in our Local Volume, in excellent agreement with the model predictions. We demonstrate that UDGs are genuine dwarf galaxies, formed in the halos of $\sim 10^{10}M_{\odot}$. It is the combination of the late formation time and high-spins of the host halos that results in the spatially extended feature of this particular population. The lack of tidal disruption features of UDGs in clusters can also be explained by their late infall-time.
  • We measured stacked weak lensing cluster masses for a sample of 1325 galaxy clusters detected by the RedGOLD algorithm in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey W1 and the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey at $0.2<z<0.5$, in the optical richness range $10<\lambda<70$. After a selection of our best richness subsample ($20<\lambda<50$), this is the most comprehensive lensing study of a $\sim 100\%$ complete and $\sim 90\%$ pure optical cluster catalogue in this redshift range, with a total of 346 clusters in $\sim164~deg^2$. We test three different mass models, and our best model includes a basic halo model, with a Navarro Frenk and White profile, and correction terms that take into account cluster miscentering, non-weak shear, the two-halo term, the contribution of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy, and an a posteriori correction for the intrinsic scatter in the mass-richness relation. With this model, we obtain a mass-richness relation of $\log{M_{\rm 200}/M_{\odot}}=(14.48\pm0.04)+(1.14\pm0.23)\log{(\lambda/40)}$ (statistical uncertainties). This result is consistent with other published lensing mass-richness relations. When compared to X-ray masses and mass proxies, we find that on average weak lensing masses are $\sim 10\%$ higher than those derived in the X-ray in the range $2\times10^{13}M_{\rm \odot}<E(z) M^{X}_{\rm 200}<2\times10^{14}M_{\rm \odot}$, in agreement with most previous results and simulations. We also give the coefficients of the scaling relations between the lensing mass and X-ray mass proxies, $L_X$ and $T_X$, and compare them with previous results.
  • Wide-field $u'g'r'i'z'$ Dark Energy Camera observations centred on the giant elliptical galaxy NGC5128 covering $\sim21deg^2$ are used to compile a new catalogue of $\sim3200$ globular clusters (GCs). We report 2404 new candidates, including the vast majority within $\sim140$kpc of NGC5128. We find evidence for a transition at a galactocentric radius of $R_{\rm gc}\approx55$kpc from GCs intrinsic to NGC5128 to those likely to have been accreted from dwarf galaxies or that may transition to the intra-group medium of the Centaurus A galaxy group. We fit power-law surface number density profiles of the form $\Sigma_{N, R_{\rm gc}}\propto R_{\rm gc}^\Gamma$ and find that inside the transition radius, the red GCs are more centrally concentrated than the blue, with $\Gamma_{\rm inner,red}\approx-1.78$ and $\Gamma_{\rm inner,blue}\approx-1.40$. Outside this region both profiles flatten, more dramatically for the red GCs ($\Gamma_{\rm outer,red}\approx-0.33$) compared to the blue ($\Gamma_{\rm outer,blue}\approx-0.61$), although the former is more likely to suffer contamination by background sources. The median $(g'\!-\!z')_0\!=\!1.27$mag colour of the inner red population is consistent with arising from the amalgamation of two giant galaxies each less luminous than present-day NGC5128. Both in- and out-ward of the transition radius, we find the fraction of blue GCs to dominate over the red GCs, indicating a lively history of minor-mergers. Assuming the blue GCs to originate primarily in dwarf galaxies, we model the population required to explain them, while remaining consistent with NGC5128's present-day spheroid luminosity. We find that several dozen dwarfs of luminosities $L_{dw,V}\simeq10^{6-9.3}L_{V,\odot}$, following a Schechter luminosity function with a faint-end slope of $-1.50\leq\alpha\leq-1.25$ is favoured, many of which may have already been disrupted in NGC5128's tidal field.
  • We use deep optical photometry from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey [NGVS] to investigate the color-magnitude diagram for the galaxies inhabiting the core of this cluster. The sensitivity of the NGVS imaging allows us to continuously probe galaxy colors over a factor of $\sim 2 \times 10^5$ in luminosity, from brightest cluster galaxies to scales overlapping classical satellites of the Milky Way [$M_{g^{\prime}}$ $\sim$ $-$9; $M_{*}$ $\sim 10^6$ M$_{\odot}$], within a single environment. Remarkably, we find the first evidence that the RS flattens in all colors at the faint-magnitude end [starting between $-$14 $\le$ $M_{g^{\prime}}$ $\le$ $-$13, around $M_{*}$ $\sim 4 \times 10^7$ M$_{\odot}$], with the slope decreasing to $\sim$60% or less of its value at brighter magnitudes. This could indicate that the stellar populations of faint dwarfs in Virgo's core share similar characteristics [e.g. constant mean age] over $\sim$3 mags in luminosity, suggesting that these galaxies were quenched coevally, likely via pre-processing in smaller hosts. We also compare our results to galaxy formation models, finding that the RS in model clusters have slopes at intermediate magnitudes that are too shallow, and in the case of semi-analytic models, do not reproduce the flattening seen at both extremes [bright/faint] of the Virgo RS. Deficiencies in the chemical evolution of model galaxies likely contribute to the model-data discrepancies at all masses, while overly efficient quenching may also be a factor at dwarf scales. Deep UV and near-IR photometry are required to unambiguously diagnose the cause of the faint-end flattening.
  • We present an analysis of high-quality photometry for globular clusters (GCs) in the Virgo cluster core region, based on data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) pilot field, and in the Milky Way (MW) based on VLT/X-Shooter spectrophotometry. We find significant discrepancies in color-color diagrams between sub-samples from different environments, confirming that the environment has a strong influence on the integrated colors of GCs. GC color distributions along a single color are not sufficient to capture the differences we observe in color-color space. While the average photometric colors become bluer with increasing radial distance to the cD galaxy M87, we also find a relation between the environment and the slope and intercept of the color-color relations. A denser environment seems to produce a larger dynamic range in certain color indices. We argue that these results are not due solely to differential extinction, IMF variations, calibration uncertainties, or overall age/metallicity variations. We therefore suggest that the relation between the environment and GC colors is, at least in part, due to chemical abundance variations, which affect stellar spectra and stellar evolution tracks. Our results demonstrate that stellar population diagnostics derived from model predictions which are calibrated on one particular sample of GCs may not be appropriate for all extragalactic GCs. These results advocate a more complex model of the assembly history of GC systems in massive galaxies that goes beyond the simple bimodality found in previous decades.
  • We present new, wide-field, optical ($u'g'r'i'z'$) Dark Energy Camera observations covering $\sim21\,{\rm deg}^2$ centred on the nearby giant elliptical galaxy NGC5128 called "The Survey of Centaurus A's Baryonic Structures" (SCABS). The data reduction and analysis procedures are described including initial source detection, photometric and astrometric calibration, image stacking, and point-spread function modelling. We estimate 50 and 90 percent, field-dependent, point-source completeness limits of at least $u'=24.08$ and $23.62$ mag (AB), $g'=22.67$ and $22.27$ mag, $r'=22.46$ and $22.00$ mag, $i'=22.05$ and $21.63$ mag, and $z'=21.71$ and $21.34$ mag. Deeper imaging in the $u'$-, $i'$- and $z'$-bands provide the fainter limits for the inner $\sim3\,{\rm deg}^2$ of the survey, and we find very stable photometric sensitivity across the entire field of view. Source catalogues are released in all filters including spatial, photometric, and morphological information for a total of $\sim5\times10^5-1.5\times10^6$ detected sources (filter-dependent). We finish with a brief discussion of potential science applications for the data including, but not limited to, upcoming works by the SCABS team.
  • We report the discovery of a very diverse set of five low-surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxy candidates in Hickson Compact Group 90 (HCG 90) detected in deep U- and I-band images obtained with VLT/VIMOS. These are the first LSB dwarf galaxy candidates found in a compact group of galaxies. We measure spheroid half-light radii in the range $0.7\!\lesssim\! r_{\rm eff}/{\rm kpc}\! \lesssim\! 1.5$ with luminosities of $-11.65\!\lesssim\! M_U\! \lesssim\! -9.42$ and $-12.79\!\lesssim\! M_I\! \lesssim\! -10.58$ mag, corresponding to a color range of $(U\!-\!I)_0\!\simeq\!1.1\!-\!2.2$ mag and surface brightness levels of $\mu_U\!\simeq\!28.1\,{\rm mag/arcsec^2}$ and $\mu_I\!\simeq\!27.4\,{\rm mag/arcsec^2}$. Their colours and luminosities are consistent with a diverse set of stellar population properties. Assuming solar and 0.02 Z$_\odot$ metallicities we obtain stellar masses in the range $M_*|_{Z_\odot} \simeq 10^{5.7-6.3} M_{\odot}$ and $M_*|_{0.02\,Z_\odot}\!\simeq\!10^{6.3-8}\,M_{\odot}$. Three dwarfs are older than 1 Gyr, while the other two significantly bluer dwarfs are younger than $\sim 2$ Gyr at any mass/metallicity combination. Altogether, the new LSB dwarf galaxy candidates share properties with dwarf galaxies found throughout the Local Volume and in nearby galaxy clusters such as Fornax. We find a pair of candidates with $\sim\!2$ kpc projected separation, which may represent one of the closest dwarf galaxy pairs found. We also find a nucleated dwarf candidate, with a nucleus size of $r_{\rm eff}\!\simeq\!46\!-\!63$ pc and magnitude M$_{U,0}=-7.42$ mag and $(U\!-\!I)_0\!=\!1.51$ mag, which is consistent with a nuclear stellar disc with a stellar mass in the range $10^{4.9-6.5}\,M_\odot$.
  • The central region of the Virgo cluster of galaxies contains thousands of globular clusters (GCs), an order of magnitude more than the numbers found in the Local Group. Relics of early star formation epochs in the universe, these GCs also provide ideal targets to test our understanding of the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of old stellar populations. Based on photometric data from the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS) and its near-infrared counterpart NGVS-IR, we select a robust sample of 1846 GCs with excellent photometry and spanning the full range of colors present in the Virgo core. The selection exploits the well defined locus of GCs in the uiK diagram and the fact that the globular clusters are marginally resolved in the images. We show that the GCs define a narrow sequence in 5-dimensional color space, with limited but real dispersion around the mean sequence. The comparison of these SEDs with the predictions of eleven widely used population synthesis models highlights differences between models, and also shows that no single model adequately matches the data in all colors. We discuss possible causes for some of these discrepancies. Forthcoming papers of this series will examine how best to estimate photometric metallicities in this context, and compare the Virgo globular cluster colors with those in other environments.
  • We investigate the shallow increase in globular cluster half-light radii with projected galactocentric distance $R_{gc}$ observed in the giant galaxies M87, NGC 1399, and NGC 5128. To model the trend in each galaxy, we explore the effects of orbital anisotropy and tidally under-filling clusters. While a strong degeneracy exists between the two parameters, we use kinematic studies to help constrain the distance $R_\beta$ beyond which cluster orbits become anisotropic, as well as the distance $R_{f\alpha}$ beyond which clusters are tidally under-filling. For M87 we find $R_\beta > 27$ kpc and $20 < R_{f\alpha} < 40$ kpc and for NGC 1399 $R_\beta > 13$ kpc and $10 < R_{f\alpha} < 30$ kpc. The connection of $R_{f\alpha}$ with each galaxy's mass profile indicates the relationship between size and $R_{gc}$ may be imposed at formation, with only inner clusters being tidally affected. The best fitted models suggest the dynamical histories of brightest cluster galaxies yield similar present-day distributions of cluster properties. For NGC 5128, the central giant in a small galaxy group, we find $R_\beta > 5$ kpc and $R_{f\alpha} > 30$ kpc. While we cannot rule out a dependence on $R_{gc}$, NGC 5128 is well fitted by a tidally filling cluster population with an isotropic distribution of orbits, suggesting it may have formed via an initial fast accretion phase. Perturbations from the surrounding environment may also affect a galaxy's orbital anisotropy profile, as outer clusters in M87 and NGC 1399 have primarily radial orbits while outer NGC 5128 clusters remain isotropic.
  • We present measurements of the galaxy luminosity and stellar mass function in a 3.71 deg$^2$ (0.3 Mpc$^2$) area in the core of the Virgo cluster, based on $ugriz$ data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). The galaxy sample consists of 352 objects brighter than $M_g=-9.13$ mag, the 50% completeness limit of the survey. Using a Bayesian analysis, we find a best-fit faint end slope of $\alpha=-1.33 \pm 0.02$ for the g-band luminosity function; consistent results are found for the stellar mass function as well as the luminosity function in the other four NGVS bandpasses. We discuss the implications for the faint-end slope of adding 92 ultra compact dwarfs galaxies (UCDs) -- previously compiled by the NGVS in this region -- to the galaxy sample, assuming that UCDs are the stripped remnants of nucleated dwarf galaxies. Under this assumption, the slope of the luminosity function (down to the UCD faint magnitude limit, $M_g = -9.6$ mag) increases dramatically, up to $\alpha = -1.60 \pm 0.06$ when correcting for the expected number of disrupted non-nucleated galaxies. We also calculate the total number of UCDs and globular clusters that may have been deposited in the core of Virgo due to the disruption of satellites, both nucleated and non-nucleated. We estimate that ~150 objects with $M_g\lesssim-9.6$ mag and that are currently classified as globular clusters, might, in fact, be the nuclei of disrupted galaxies. We further estimate that as many as 40% of the (mostly blue) globular clusters in the core of Virgo might once have belonged to such satellites; these same disrupted satellites might have contributed ~40% of the total luminosity in galaxies observed in the core region today. Finally, we use an updated Local Group galaxy catalog to provide a new measurement of the luminosity function of Local Group satellites, $\alpha=-1.21\pm0.05$.
  • Polar ring galaxies (PRGs) are composed of two kinematically distinct and nearly orthogonal components, a host galaxy (HG) and a polar ring/disk (PR). The HG usually contains an older stellar population than the PR. The suggested formation channel of PRGs is still poorly constrained. Suggested options are merger, gas accretion, tidal interaction, or a combination of both. To constrain the formation scenario of PRGs, we study the compact stellar systems (CSSs) in two PRGs at different evolutionary stages: NGC 4650A with well-defined PR, and NGC 3808B, which is in the process of PR formation. We use archival HST/WFPC2 imaging. PSF-fitting techniques, and color selection criteria are used to select cluster candidates. Photometric analysis of the CSSs was performed to determine their ages and masses using stellar population models at a fixed metallicity. Both PRGs contain young CSSs ($< 1$ Gyr) with masses of up to 5$\times$10$^6$M$_\odot$, mostly located in the PR and along the tidal debris. The most massive CSSs may be progenitors of metal-rich globular clusters or ultra compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies. We identify one such young UCD candidate, NGC 3808 B-8, and measure its size of $r_{\rm eff}=25.23^{+1.43}_{-2.01}$ pc. We reconstruct the star formation history of the two PRGs and find strong peaks in the star formation rate (SFR $\simeq$ 200M$_\odot$/yr) in NGC 3808B, while NGC 4650A shows milder (declining) star formation (SFR $<$ 10M$_\odot$/yr). This difference may support different evolutionary paths between these PRGs. The spatial distribution, masses, and peak star formation epoch of the clusters in NGC 3808 suggest for a tidally triggered star formation. Incompleteness at old ages prevents us from probing the SFR at earlier epochs of NGC 4650A, where we observe the fading tail of CSS formation. This also impedes us from testing the formation scenarios of this PRG.
  • We present early results from a detailed analysis of the BSS population in Galactic GCs based on HST data.Using proper motion cleaning of the color-magnitude diagrams we construct a large catalog of BSSs and study some population properties.Stellar evolutionary models are used to find stellar mass and age estimates for the BSS populations in order to establish constraints related to the dynamical interactions in which they may have formed.
  • We conduct a comprehensive numerical study of the orbital dependence of harassment on early-type dwarfs consisting of 168 different orbits within a realistic, Virgo-like cluster, varying in eccentricity and pericentre distance. We find harassment is only effective at stripping stars or truncating their stellar disks for orbits that enter deep into the cluster core. Comparing to the orbital distribution in cosmological simulations, we find that the majority of the orbits (more than three quarters) result in no stellar mass loss. We also study the effects on the radial profiles of the globular cluster systems of early-type dwarfs. We find these are significantly altered only if harassment is very strong. This suggests that perhaps most early-type dwarfs in clusters such as Virgo have not suffered any tidal stripping of stars or globular clusters due to harassment, as these components are safely embedded deep within their dark matter halo. We demonstrate that this result is actually consistent with an earlier study of harassment of dwarf galaxies, despite the apparent contradiction. Those few dwarf models that do suffer stellar stripping are found out to the virial radius of the cluster at redshift=0, which mixes them in with less strongly harassed galaxies. However when placed on phase-space diagrams, strongly harassed galaxies are found offset to lower velocities compared to weakly harassed galaxies. This remains true in a cosmological simulation, even when halos have a wide range of masses and concentrations. Thus phase-space diagrams may be a useful tool for determining the relative likelihood that galaxies have been strongly or weakly harassed.
  • Gas-rich galaxies in dense environments such as galaxy clusters and massive groups are affected by a number of possible types of interactions with the cluster environment, which make their evolution radically different than that of field galaxies. The dIrr galaxy NGC 1427A, presently infalling towards the core of the Fornax galaxy cluster, offers a unique opportunity to study those processes in a level of detail not possible to achieve for galaxies at higher redshifts. Using HST/ACS and auxiliary VLT/FORS ground-based observations, we study the properties of the most recent episodes of star formation in this gas-rich galaxy, the only one of its type near the core of the Fornax cluster. We study the structural and photometric properties of young star cluster complexes in NGC 1427A, identifying 12 bright such complexes with exceptionally blue colors. The comparison of our broadband near-UV/optical photometry with simple stellar population models yields ages below ~4x10^6 yr and stellar masses from a few thousand up to ~3x10^4 Msun, slightly dependent on the assumption of cluster metallicity and IMF. Their grouping is consistent with hierarchical and fractal star cluster formation. We use deep Ha imaging data to determine the current Star Formation Rate (SFR) in NGC 1427A and estimate the ratio, Gamma, of star formation occurring in these star cluster complexes to that in the entire galaxy. We find Gamma to be among the largest such values available in the literature, consistent with starburst galaxies. Thus a large fraction of the current star formation in NGC 1427A is occurring in star clusters, with the peculiar spatial arrangement of such complexes strongly hinting at the possibility that the starburst is being triggered by the passage of the galaxy through the cluster environment.
  • We use imaging from the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS) to present a comparative study of ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies associated with three prominent Virgo sub-clusters: those centered on the massive, red-sequence galaxies M87, M49 and M60. We show how UCDs can be selected with high completeness using a combination of half-light radius and location in color-color diagrams ($u^*iK_s$ or $u^*gz$). Although the central galaxies in each of these sub-clusters have nearly identical luminosities and stellar masses, we find large differences in the sizes of their UCD populations, with M87 containing ~3.5 and 7.8 times more UCDs than M49 and M60, respectively. The relative abundance of UCDs in the three regions scales in proportion to sub-cluster mass, as traced by X-ray gas mass, total gravitating mass, number of globular clusters, and number of nearby galaxies. We find that the UCDs are predominantly blue in color, with ~85% of the UCDs having colors similar to blue GCs and stellar nuclei of dwarf galaxies. We present evidence that UCDs surrounding M87 and M49 may follow a morphological sequence ordered by the prominence of their outer, low surface brightness envelope, ultimately merging with the sequence of nucleated low-mass galaxies, and that envelope prominence correlates with distance from either galaxy. Our analysis provides evidence that tidal stripping of nucleated galaxies is an important process in the formation of UCDs.