• We present the detection of very extended stellar populations around the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) out to R~21 degrees, or ~18.5 kpc at the LMC distance of 50 kpc, as detected in the Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) performed with the Dark Energy Camera on the NOAO Blanco 4m Telescope. The deep (g~24) SMASH color magnitude diagrams (CMDs) clearly reveal old (~9 Gyr), metal-poor ([Fe/H]=-0.8 dex) main-sequence stars at a distance of 50 kpc. The surface brightness of these detections is extremely low with our most distant detection having 34 mag per arcsec squared in g-band. The SMASH radial density profile breaks from the inner LMC exponential decline at ~13-15 degrees and a second component at larger radii has a shallower slope with power-law index of -2.2 that contributes ~0.4% of the LMC's total stellar mass. In addition, the SMASH densities exhibit large scatter around our best-fit model of ~70% indicating that the envelope of stellar material in the LMC periphery is highly disturbed. We also use data from the NOAO Source catalog to map the LMC main-sequence populations at intermediate radii and detect a steep dropoff in density on the eastern side of the LMC (at R~8 deg) as well as an extended structure to the far northeast. These combined results confirm the existence of a very extended, low-density envelope of stellar material with disturbed shape around the LMC. The exact origin of this structure remains unclear but the leading options include a classical accreted halo or tidally stripped outer disk material.
  • We explore the stellar structure of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) disk using data from the Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) and the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We detect a ring-like stellar overdensity in the red clump star count map at a radius of ~6 degrees (~5.2kpc at the LMC distance) that is continuous over ~270 degrees in position angle and is only limited by the current data coverage. The overdensity is clearly continuous in the southern disk, as covered by the SMASH survey, with an amplitude up to 2.5 times higher than that of the underlying smooth disk. This structure might be related to the multiple arms found by de Vaucouleurs (1955). We find that the overdensity shows spatial correlation with intermediate-age star clusters, but not with young (< 1Gyr) main sequence stars, indicating the stellar populations associated with the overdensity are intermediate in age or older. This suggests that either (1) the overdensity formed out of an asymmetric one-armed spiral wrapping around the LMC main body, which is induced by repeated encounters with the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) over the last Gyr, or (2) the overdensity formed very recently as a tidal response to a direct collision with the SMC. Both scenarios suggest that the ring-like overdensity is likely a product of tidal interaction with the SMC, but not with the Milky Way halo.
  • We present a study of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using ~2.2 million red clump (RC) stars selected from the Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH). To correct for line-of-sight dust extinction, the intrinsic RC color and magnitude and their radial dependence are carefully measured by using internal nearly dust-free regions. These are then used to construct an accurate 2D reddening map (165 square degrees with ~10 arcmin resolution) of the LMC disk and the 3D spatial distribution of RC stars. An inclined disk model is fit to the 2D distance map yielding a best-fit inclination angle i = 25.86(+0.73,-1.39) degrees with random errors of +\-0.19 degrees, line-of-nodes position angle theta = 149.23(+6.43,-8.35) degrees with random errors of +/-0.49 degrees. These angles vary with galactic radius, indicating that the LMC disk is warped and twisted likely due to the repeated tidal interactions with the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). For the first time, our data reveal a significant warp in the southwest of the outer disk starting at rho ~ 7 degrees that departs from the defined LMC plane up to ~4 kpc towards the SMC, suggesting that it originated from a strong interaction with the SMC. In addition, the inner disk encompassing the off-centered bar appears to be tilted up to 5-15 degrees relative to the rest of the LMC disk. These findings on the outer warp and the tilted bar are consistent with the predictions from the Besla et al. (2012) simulation of a recent direct collision with the SMC.
  • The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) are unique local laboratories for studying the formation and evolution of small galaxies in exquisite detail. The Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) is an NOAO community DECam survey of the Clouds mapping 480 square degrees (distributed over ~2400 square degrees at ~20% filling factor) to ~24th mag in ugriz with the goal of identifying broadly distributed, low surface brightness stellar populations associated with the stellar halos and tidal debris of the Clouds. SMASH will also derive spatially-resolved star formation histories covering all ages out to large radii from the MCs that will further complement our understanding of their formation. Here, we present a summary of the survey, its data reduction, and a description of the first public Data Release (DR1). The SMASH DECam data have been reduced with a combination of the NOAO Community Pipeline, PHOTRED, an automated PSF photometry pipeline based mainly on the DAOPHOT suite, and custom calibration software. The attained astrometric precision is ~15 mas and the accuracy is ~2 mas with respect to the Gaia DR1 astrometric reference frame. The photometric precision is ~0.5-0.7% in griz and ~1% in u with a calibration accuracy of ~1.3% in all bands. The median 5 sigma point source depths in ugriz bands are 23.9, 24.8, 24.5, 24.2, 23.5 mag. The SMASH data already have been used to discover the Hydra II Milky Way satellite, the SMASH 1 old globular cluster likely associated with the LMC, and very extended stellar populations around the LMC out to R~18.4 kpc. SMASH DR1 contains measurements of ~100 million objects distributed in 61 fields. A prototype version of the NOAO Data Lab provides data access, including a data discovery tool, SMASH database access, an image cutout service, and a Jupyter notebook server with example notebooks for exploratory analysis.
  • We present a novel approach to draw the synthetic color-magnitude diagram of galaxies, which can provide - in principle - a deeper insight in the interpretation and understanding of current observations. In particular, we `light up' the stars of chemical evolution models, according to their initial mass, metallicity and age, to eventually understand how the assumed underlying galaxy formation and evolution scenario affects the final configuration of the synthetic CMD. In this way, we obtain a new set of observational constraints for chemical evolution models beyond the usual photospheric chemical abundances. The strength of our method resides in the very fine grid of metallicities and ages of the assumed database of stellar isochrones. In this work, we apply our photo-chemical model to reproduce the observed CMD of the Sculptor dSph and find that we can reproduce the main features of the observed CMD. The main discrepancies are found at fainter magnitudes in the main sequence turn-off and sub-giant branch, where the observed CMD extends towards bluer colors than the synthetic one; we suggest that this is a signature of metal-poor stellar populations in the data, which cannot be captured by our assumed one-zone chemical evolution model.
  • We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Hydra II, found serendipitously within the data from the ongoing Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) conducted with the Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4m Telescope. The new satellite is compact (r_h = 68 +/- 11 pc) and faint (M_V = -4.8 +/- 0.3), but well within the realm of dwarf galaxies. The stellar distribution of HydraII in the color-magnitude diagram is well-described by a metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -2.2) and old (13 Gyr) isochrone and shows a distinct blue horizontal branch, some possible red clump stars, and faint stars that are suggestive of blue stragglers. At a heliocentric distance of 134 +/- 10 kpc, Hydra II is located in a region of the Galactic halo that models have suggested may host material from the leading arm of the Magellanic Stream. A comparison with N-body simulations hints that the new dwarf galaxy could be or could have been a satellite of the Magellanic Clouds.
  • We combine the detailed Star Formation Histories of the Fornax and Sculptor dwarf Spheroidals with the Mass Assembly History of their dark matter (DM) halo progenitors to estimate if the energy deposited by Supernova type II (SNeII) is sufficient to create a substantial DM core. Assuming the efficiency of energy injection of the SNeII into DM particles is $\epsilon_{\rm gc}=0.05$, we find that a single early episode, $z \gtrsim z_{\rm infall}$, that combines the energy of all SNeII due to explode over 0.5 Gyr, is sufficient to create a core of several hundred parsecs in both Sculptor and Fornax. Therefore, our results suggest that it is energetically plausible to form cores in Cold Dark Matter (CDM) halos via early episodic gas outflows triggered by SNeII. Furthermore, based on CDM merger rates and phase-space density considerations, we argue that the probability of a subsequent complete regeneration of the cusp is small for a substantial fraction of dwarf-size haloes.
  • We present abundances for seven stars in the (extremely) low-metallicity tail of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, from spectra taken with X-shooter on the ESO VLT. Targets were selected from the Ca II triplet (CaT) survey of the Dwarf Abundances and Radial Velocities Team (DART) using the latest calibration. Of the seven extremely metal-poor candidates, five stars are confirmed to be extremely metal-poor (i.e., [Fe/H]<-3 dex), with [Fe/H]=-3.47 +/- 0.07 for our most metal-poor star. All are around or below [Fe/H]=-2.5 dex from the measurement of individual Fe lines. These values are in agreement with the CaT predictions to within error bars. None of the seven stars is found to be carbon-rich. We estimate a 2-13% possibility of this being a pure chance effect, which could indicate a lower fraction of carbon-rich extremely metal-poor stars in Sculptor compared to the Milky Way halo. The [alpha/Fe] ratios show a range from +0.5 to -0.5, a larger variation than seen in Galactic samples although typically consistent within 1-2sigma. One star seems mildly iron-enhanced. Our program stars show no deviations from the Galactic abundance trends in chromium and the heavy elements barium and strontium. Sodium abundances are, however, below the Galactic values for several stars. Overall, we conclude that the CaT lines are a successful metallicity indicator down to the extremely metal-poor regime and that the extremely metal-poor stars in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy are chemically more similar to their Milky Way halo equivalents than the more metal-rich population of stars.