• Sparse sensor placement is a central challenge in the efficient characterization of complex systems when the cost of acquiring and processing data is high. Leading sparse sensing methods typically exploit either spatial or temporal correlations, but rarely both. This work introduces a new sparse sensor optimization that is designed to leverage the rich spatiotemporal coherence exhibited by many systems. Our approach is inspired by the remarkable performance of flying insects, which use a few embedded strain-sensitive neurons to achieve rapid and robust flight control despite large gust disturbances. Specifically, we draw on nature to identify targeted neural-inspired sensors on a flapping wing to detect body rotation. This task is particularly challenging as the rotational twisting mode is three orders-of-magnitude smaller than the flapping modes. We show that nonlinear filtering in time, built to mimic strain-sensitive neurons, is essential to detect rotation, whereas instantaneous measurements fail. Optimized sparse sensor placement results in efficient classification with approximately ten sensors, achieving the same accuracy and noise robustness as full measurements consisting of hundreds of sensors. Sparse sensing with neural inspired encoding establishes a new paradigm in hyper-efficient, embodied sensing of spatiotemporal data and sheds light on principles of biological sensing for agile flight control.
  • Control theory arose from a need to control synthetic systems. From regulating steam engines to tuning radios to devices capable of autonomous movement, it provided a formal mathematical basis for understanding the role of feedback in the stability (or change) of dynamical systems. It provides a framework for understanding any system with feedback regulation, including biological ones such as regulatory gene networks, cellular metabolic systems, sensorimotor dynamics of moving animals, and even ecological or evolutionary dynamics of organisms and populations. Here we focus on four case studies of the sensorimotor dynamics of animals, each of which involves the application of principles from control theory to probe stability and feedback in an organism's response to perturbations. We use examples from aquatic (electric fish station keeping and jamming avoidance), terrestrial (cockroach wall following) and aerial environments (flight control in moths) to highlight how one can use control theory to understand how feedback mechanisms interact with the physical dynamics of animals to determine their stability and response to sensory inputs and perturbations. Each case study is cast as a control problem with sensory input, neural processing, and motor dynamics, the output of which feeds back to the sensory inputs. Collectively, the interaction of these systems in a closed loop determines the behavior of the entire system.