• We present optical and near-infrared adaptive optics (AO) imaging and spectroscopy of 13 ultracool (>M6) companions to late-type stars (K7-M4.5), most of which have recently been identified as candidate members of nearby young moving groups (YMGs; 8-120 Myr) in the literature. The inferred masses of the companions (~10-100 Mjup) are highly sensitive to the ages of the primary stars so we critically examine the kinematic and spectroscopic properties of each system to distinguish bona fide YMG members from old field interlopers. 2MASS J02155892-0929121 C is a new M7 substellar companion (40-60 Mjup) with clear spectroscopic signs of low gravity and hence youth. The primary, possibly a member of the ~40 Myr Tuc-Hor moving group, is visually resolved into three components, making it a young low-mass quadruple system in a compact (<100 AU) configuration. In addition, Li 1 $\lambda$6708 absorption in the intermediate-gravity M7.5 companion 2MASS J15594729+4403595 B provides unambiguous evidence that it is young (<200 Myr) and resides below the hydrogen burning limit. Three new close-separation (<1") companions (2MASS J06475229-2523304 B, PYC J11519+0731 B, and GJ 4378 Ab) orbit stars previously reported as candidate YMG members, but instead are likely old (>1 Gyr) tidally-locked spectroscopic binaries without convincing kinematic associations with any known moving group. The high rate of false positives in the form of old active stars with YMG-like kinematics underscores the importance of radial velocity and parallax measurements to validate candidate young stars identified via proper motion and activity selection alone. Finally, we spectroscopically confirm the cool temperature and substellar nature of HD 23514 B, a recently discovered M8 benchmark brown dwarf orbiting the dustiest-known member of the Pleiades. [Abridged]
  • We present a new algorithm designed to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of point and extended source detections in direct imaging data. The novel part of our method is that it finds the linear combination of the science images that best match counterpart images with signal removed from suspected source regions. The algorithm, based on the Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI) method, is called Matched LOCI or MLOCI. We show using data obtained with the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) and Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) that the new algorithm can improve the SNR of point source detections by 30-400% over past methods. We also find no increase in false detections rates. No prior knowledge of candidate companion locations is required to use MLOCI. While non-blind applications may yield linear combinations of science images which seem to increase the SNR of true sources by a factor > 2, they can also yield false detections at high rates. This is a potential pitfall when trying to confirm marginal detections or to re-detect point sources found in previous epochs. Our findings are relevant to any method where the coefficients of the linear combination are considered tunable, e.g. LOCI and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Thus we recommend that false detection rates be analyzed when using these techniques.
  • We describe the astrometric calibration of the Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign. The Campaign requires a relative astrometric accuracy of $\approx$ 20 mas across multi-year timescales in order to distinguish true companions from background stars by verifying common proper motion and parallax with their parent stars. The calibration consists of a correction for instrumental optical image distortion, plus on-sky imaging of astrometric fields to determine the pixel scale and image orientation. We achieve an accuracy of $\lesssim 7$ mas between the center and edge of the 18$''$ NICI field, meeting the 20 mas requirement. Most of the Campaign data in the Gemini Science Archive are accurate to this level but we identify a number of anomalies and present methods to correct the errors.
  • We present J, H, CH_4 short (1.578 micron), CH_4 long (1.652 micron) and K_s-band images of the dust ring around the 10 Myr old star HR 4796 A obtained using the Near Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) on the Gemini-South 8.1 meter Telescope. Our images clearly show for the first time the position of the star relative to its circumstellar ring thanks to NICI's translucent focal plane occulting mask. We employ a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to constrain the offset vector between the two. The resulting probability distribution shows that the ring center is offset from the star by 16.7+/-1.3 milliarcseconds along a position angle of 26+/-3 degrees, along the PA of the ring, 26.47+/-0.04 degrees. We find that the size of this offset is not large enough to explain the brightness asymmetry of the ring. The ring is measured to have mostly red reflectivity across the JHK_s filters, which seems to indicate micron-sized grains. Just like Neptune's 3:2 and 2:1 mean-motion resonances delineate the inner and outer edges of the classical Kuiper Belt, we find that the radial extent of the HR 4796 A and Fomalhaut rings could correspond to the 3:2 and 2:1 mean-motion resonances of hypothetical planets at 54.7 AU and 97.7 AU in the two systems, respectively. A planet orbiting HR 4796 A at 54.7 AU would have to be less massive than 1.6 Mjup so as not to widen the ring too much by stirring.
  • We present the first ground-based CCD ($\lambda < 1\mu$m) image of an extrasolar planet. Using MagAO's VisAO camera we detected the extrasolar giant planet (EGP) $\beta$ Pictoris b in $Y$-short ($Y_S$, 0.985 $\mu$m), at a separation of $0.470 \pm 0.010''$ and a contrast of $(1.63 \pm 0.49) \times 10^{-5}$. This detection has a signal-to-noise ratio of 4.1, with an empirically estimated upper-limit on false alarm probability of 1.0%. We also present new photometry from the NICI instrument on the Gemini-South telescope, in $CH_{4S,1\%}$ ($1.58$ $\mu m$), $K_S$ ($2.18\mu m$), and $K_{cont}$ (2.27 $\mu m$). A thorough analysis of our photometry combined with previous measurements yields an estimated near-IR spectral type of L$2.5\pm1.5$, consistent with previous estimates. We estimate log$(L_{bol}/L_{Sun})$ = $-3.86 \pm 0.04$, which is consistent with prior estimates for $\beta$ Pic b and with field early-L brown dwarfs. This yields a hot-start mass estimate of $11.9 \pm 0.7$ $M_{Jup}$ for an age of $21\pm4$ Myr, with an upper limit below the deuterium burning mass. Our $L_{bol}$ based hot-start estimate for temperature is $T_{eff}=1643\pm32$ K (not including model dependent uncertainty). Due to the large corresponding model-derived radius of $R=1.43\pm0.02$ $R_{Jup}$, this $T_{eff}$ is $\sim$$250$ K cooler than would be expected for a field L2.5 brown dwarf. Other young, low-gravity (large radius), ultracool dwarfs and directly-imaged EGPs also have lower effective temperatures than are implied by their spectral types. However, such objects tend to be anomalously red in the near-IR compared to field brown dwarfs. In contrast, $\beta$ Pic b has near-IR colors more typical of an early-L dwarf despite its lower inferred temperature.
  • We present the high-contrast image processing techniques used by the Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign to detect faint companions to bright stars. NICI (Near Infrared Coronagraphic Imager) is an adaptive optics instrument installed on the 8-m Gemini South telescope, capable of angular and spectral difference imaging and specifically designed to image exoplanets. The Campaign data pipeline achieves median contrasts of 12.6 magnitudes at 0.5" and 14.4 magnitudes at 1" separation, for a sample of 45 stars (V= 4.3-13.9 mag) from the early phase of the Campaign. We also present a novel approach to calculating contrast curves for companion detection based on 95% completeness in the recovery of artificial companions injected into the raw data, while accounting for the false-positive rate. We use this technique to select the image processing algorithms that are more successful at recovering faint simulated point sources. We compare our pipeline to the performance of the LOCI algorithm for NICI data and do not find significant improvement with LOCI.
  • We report results of a direct imaging survey for giant planets around 80 members of the Beta Pic, TW Hya, Tucana-Horologium, AB Dor, and Hercules-Lyra moving groups, observed as part of the Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign. For this sample, we obtained median contrasts of \Delta H=13.9 mag at 1" in combined CH4 narrowband ADI+SDI mode and median contrasts of \Delta H=15.1 mag at 2" in H-band ADI mode. We found numerous (>70) candidate companions in our survey images. Some of these candidates were rejected as common-proper motion companions using archival data; we reobserved with NICI all other candidates that lay within 400 AU of the star and were not in dense stellar fields. The vast majority of candidate companions were confirmed as background objects from archival observations and/or dedicated NICI campaign followup. Four co-moving companions of brown dwarf or stellar mass were discovered in this moving group sample: PZ Tel B (36+-6 MJup, 16.4+-1.0 AU, Biller et al. 2010), CD -35 2722B (31+-8 MJup, 67+-4 AU, Wahhaj et al. 2011), HD 12894B (0.46+-0.08 MSun, 15.7+-1.0 AU), and BD+07 1919C (0.20+-0.03 MSun, 12.5+-1.4 AU). From a Bayesian analysis of the achieved H band ADI and ASDI contrasts, using power-law models of planet distributions and hot-start evolutionary models, we restrict the frequency of 1--20 MJup companions at semi-major axes from 10--150 AU to <18% at a 95.4% confidence level using DUSTY models and to <6% at a 95.4% using COND models.
  • We have completed a high-contrast direct imaging survey for giant planets around 57 debris disk stars as part of the Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign. We achieved median H-band contrasts of 12.4 mag at 0.5" and 14.1 mag at 1" separation. Follow-up observations of the 66 candidates with projected separation < 500 AU show that all of them are background objects. To establish statistical constraints on the underlying giant planet population based on our imaging data, we have developed a new Bayesian formalism that incorporates (1) non-detections, (2) single-epoch candidates, (3) astrometric and (4) photometric information, and (5) the possibility of multiple planets per star to constrain the planet population. Our formalism allows us to include in our analysis the previously known Beta Pictoris and the HR 8799 planets. Our results show at 95% confidence that <13% of debris disk stars have a >5MJup planet beyond 80 AU, and <21% of debris disk stars have a >3MJup planet outside of 40 AU, based on hot-start evolutionary models. We model the population of directly-imaged planets as d^2N/dMda ~ m^alpha a^beta, where m is planet mass and a is orbital semi-major axis (with a maximum value of amax). We find that beta < -0.8 and/or alpha > 1.7. Likewise, we find that beta < -0.8 and/or amax < 200 AU. If we ignore the Beta Pic and HR 8799 planets (should they belong to a rare and distinct group), we find that < 20% of debris disk stars have a > 3MJup planet beyond 10 AU, and beta < -0.8 and/or alpha < -1.5. Our Bayesian constraints are not strong enough to reveal any dependence of the planet frequency on stellar host mass. Studies of transition disks have suggested that about 20% of stars are undergoing planet formation; our non-detections at large separations show that planets with orbital separation > 40 AU and planet masses > 3 MJup do not carve the central holes in these disks.
  • We have carried out high contrast imaging of 70 young, nearby B and A stars to search for brown dwarf and planetary companions as part of the Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign. Our survey represents the largest, deepest survey for planets around high-mass stars (~1.5-2.5 M_sun) conducted to date and includes the planet hosts beta Pic and Fomalhaut. We obtained follow-up astrometry of all candidate companions within 400 AU projected separation for stars in uncrowded fields and identified new low-mass companions to HD 1160 and HIP 79797. We have found that the previously known young brown dwarf companion to HIP 79797 is itself a tight (3 AU) binary, composed of brown dwarfs with masses 58 (+21, -20) M_Jup and 55 (+20, -19) M_Jup, making this system one of the rare substellar binaries in orbit around a star. Considering the contrast limits of our NICI data and the fact that we did not detect any planets, we use high-fidelity Monte Carlo simulations to show that fewer than 20% of 2 M_sun stars can have giant planets greater than 4 M_Jup between 59 and 460 AU at 95% confidence, and fewer than 10% of these stars can have a planet more massive than 10 M_Jup between 38 and 650 AU. Overall, we find that large-separation giant planets are not common around B and A stars: fewer than 10% of B and A stars can have an analog to the HR 8799 b (7 M_Jup, 68 AU) planet at 95% confidence. We also describe a new Bayesian technique for determining the ages of field B and A stars from photometry and theoretical isochrones. Our method produces more plausible ages for high-mass stars than previous age-dating techniques, which tend to underestimate stellar ages and their uncertainties.
  • Hipparcos astrometric binaries were observed with the NICI adaptive optics system at Gemini-S, completing the work of Paper I (Tokovinin et al. 2012). Among the 65 F, G, K dwarfs within 67pc of the Sun studied here, we resolve 18 new sub-arcsecond companions, re-measure 7 known astrometric pairs, and establish the physical nature of yet another three wider companions. The 107 astrometric binaries targeted at Gemini so far have 38 resolved companions with separations under 3". Modeling shows that bright enough companions with separations on the order of an arcsecond can perturb the Hipparcos astrometry when they are not accounted for in the data reduction. However, the resulting bias of parallax and proper motion is generally below formal errors and such companions cannot produce fake acceleration. This work contributes to the multiplicity statistics of nearby dwarfs by bridging the gap between spectroscopic and visual binaries and by providing estimates of periods and mass ratios for many astrometric binaries.
  • A subset of 51 Hipparcos astrometric binaries among FG dwarfs within 67pc has been surveyed with the NICI adaptive optics system at Gemini-S, directly resolving for the first time 17 sub-arcsecond companions and 7 wider ones. Using these data together with published speckle interferometry of 57 stars, we compare the statistics of resolved astrometric companions with those of a simulated binary population. The fraction of resolved companions is slightly lower than expected from binary statistics. About 10% of astrometric companions could be "dark" (white dwarfs and close pairs of late M-dwarfs). To our surprise, several binaries are found with companions too wide to explain the acceleration. Re-analysis of selected intermediate astrometric data shows that some acceleration solutions in the original Hipparcos catalog are spurious.
  • We report the discovery by the Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign of two low-mass companions to the young A0V star HD 1160 at projected separations of 81 +/- 5 AU (HD 1160 B) and 533 +/- 25 AU (HD 1160 C). VLT images of the system taken over a decade for the purpose of using HD 1160 A as a photometric calibrator confirm that both companions are physically associated. By comparing the system to members of young moving groups and open clusters with well-established ages, we estimate an age of 50 (+50,-40) Myr for HD 1160 ABC. While the UVW motion of the system does not match any known moving group, the small magnitude of the space velocity is consistent with youth. Near-IR spectroscopy shows HD 1160 C to be an M3.5 +/- 0.5 star with an estimated mass of 0.22 (+0.03,-0.04) M_Sun, while NIR photometry of HD 1160 B suggests a brown dwarf with a mass of 33 (+12,-9) M_Jup. The very small mass ratio (0.014) between the A and B components of the system is rare for A star binaries, and would represent a planetary-mass companion were HD 1160 A to be slightly less massive than the Sun.
  • We present the discovery of a wide (67 AU) substellar companion to the nearby (21 pc) young solar-metallicity M1 dwarf CD-35 2722, a member of the ~100 Myr AB Doradus association. Two epochs of astrometry from the NICI Planet-Finding Campaign confirm that CD-35 2722 B is physically associated with the primary star. Near-IR spectra indicate a spectral type of L4\pm1 with a moderately low surface gravity, making it one of the coolest young companions found to date. The absorption lines and near-IR continuum shape of CD-35 2722 B agree especially well the dusty field L4.5 dwarf 2MASS J22244381-0158521, while the near-IR colors and absolute magnitudes match those of the 5 Myr old L4 planetary-mass companion, 1RXS J160929.1-210524 b. Overall, CD-35 2722 B appears to be an intermediate-age benchmark for L-dwarfs, with a less peaked H-band continuum than the youngest objects and near-IR absorption lines comparable to field objects. We fit Ames-Dusty model atmospheres to the near-IR spectra and find T=1700-1900 K and log(g) =4.5\pm0.5. The spectra also show that the radial velocities of components A and B agree to within \pm10 km/s, further confirming their physical association. Using the age and bolometric luminosity of CD-35 2722 B, we derive a mass of 31\pm8 Mjup from the Lyon/Dusty evolutionary models. Altogether, young late-M to mid-L type companions appear to be over-luminous for their near-IR spectral type compared to field objects, in contrast to the under-luminosity of young late-L and early-T dwarfs.
  • Our team is carrying out a multi-year observing program to directly image and characterize young extrasolar planets using the Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) on the Gemini-South 8.1-meter telescope. NICI is the first instrument on a large telescope designed from the outset for high-contrast imaging, comprising a high-performance curvature adaptive optics system with a simultaneous dual-channel coronagraphic imager. Combined with state-of-the-art observing methods and data processing, NICI typically achieves ~2 magnitudes better contrast compared to previous ground-based or space-based programs, at separations inside of ~2 arcsec. In preparation for the Campaign, we carried out efforts to identify previously unrecognized young stars, to rigorously construct our observing strategy, and to optimize the combination of angular and spectral differential imaging. The Planet-Finding Campaign is in its second year, with first-epoch imaging of 174 stars already obtained out of a total sample of 300 stars. We describe the Campaign's goals, design, implementation, performance, and preliminary results. The NICI Campaign represents the largest and most sensitive imaging survey to date for massive (~1 Mjup) planets around other stars. Upon completion, the Campaign will establish the best measurements to date on the properties of young gas-giant planets at ~5-10 AU separations. Finally, Campaign discoveries will be well-suited to long-term orbital monitoring and detailed spectrophotometric followup with next-generation planet-finding instruments.
  • We report the discovery of a tight substellar companion to the young solar analog PZ Tel, a member of the Beta Pictoris moving group observed with high contrast adaptive optics imaging as part of the Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign. The companion was detected at a projected separation of 16.4 +/- 1.0 AU (0.33 +/- 0.01") in April 2009. Second-epoch observations in May 2010 demonstrate that the companion is physically associated and shows significant orbital motion. Monte Carlo modeling constrains the orbit of PZ Tel B to eccentricities > 0.6. The near-IR colors of PZ Tel B indicate a spectral type of M7+/-2 and thus this object will be a new benchmark companion for studies of ultracool, low-gravity photospheres. Adopting an age of 12 +8 -4 Myr for the system, we estimate a mass of 36 +/- 6 Mjup based on the Lyon/DUSTY evolutionary models. PZ Tel B is one of few young substellar companions directly imaged at orbital separations similar to those of giant planets in our own solar system. Additionally, the primary star PZ Tel A shows a 70 um emission excess, evidence for a significant quantity of circumstellar dust that has not been disrupted by the orbital motion of the companion.
  • The Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) is a high-contrast AO imager at the Gemini South telescope. The camera includes a coronagraphic mask and dual channel imaging for Spectral Differential Imaging (SDI). The instrument can also be used in a fixed Cassegrain Rotator mode for Angular Differential Imaging (ADI). While coronagraphy, SDI, and ADI have been applied before in direct imaging searches for exoplanets. NICI represents the first time that these 3 techniques can be combined. We present preliminary NICI commissioning data using these techniques and show that combining SDI and ADI results in significant gains.
  • We present ground-based SpectroCam-10 mid-infrared, MMT optical, and Spitzer Space Telescope IRS mid-infrared spectra taken 7.62, 18.75, and 19.38 years respectively after the outburst of the old classical nova QU Vulpeculae (Nova Vul 1984 #2). The spectra of the ejecta are dominated by forbidden line emission from neon and oxygen. Our analysis shows that neon was, at the first and last epochs respectively, more than 76 and 168 times overabundant by number with respect to hydrogen compared to the solar value. These high lower limits to the neon abundance confirm that QU Vul involved a thermonuclear runaway on an ONeMg white dwarf and approach the yields predicted by models of the nucleosynthesis in such events.
  • We present the first thermal-infrared imaging photometry for several embedded sources in the OMC1 South cloud core in the Orion nebula, and propose that some of these drive optical Herbig-Haro jets emerging from the region. Thermal-infrared images at 8.8 and 11.7 micron obtained at Gemini South show a handful of sources in OMC1-S with no visual-wavelength counterparts, although a few can be seen in recent near-infrared data. For the three brightest mid-infrared sources, we also present 18.75 micron photometry obtained with the Keck telescope. The most prominent blueshifted outflows in the Orion nebula at visual wavelengths such as HH202, HH203/204, HH529, and HH269 all originate from OMC1-S. The brightest infrared source in OMC1-S at 11.7 micron is located at the base of the prominent jet that powers HH202 and is likely to be the sought-after driver of this outflow. The second brightest infrared source is located at the base of the HH529 jet. We consider the possibility that HH203/204 and HH269 trace parts of a single bent outflow from the third-brightest infrared source. While there may be some lingering ambiguity about which infrared stars drive specific jets, there is now a sufficient number of embedded sources to plausibly account for the multiple outflows from OMC1-S.