• Intelligent systems for the annotation of media content are increasingly being used for the automation of parts of social science research. In this domain the problem of integrating various Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms into a single intelligent system arises spontaneously. As part of our ongoing effort in automating media content analysis for the social sciences, we have built a modular system by combining multiple AI modules into a flexible framework in which they can cooperate in complex tasks. Our system combines data gathering, machine translation, topic classification, extraction and annotation of entities and social networks, as well as many other tasks that have been perfected over the past years of AI research. Over the last few years, it has allowed us to realise a series of scientific studies over a vast range of applications including comparative studies between news outlets and media content in different countries, modelling of user preferences, and monitoring public mood. The framework is flexible and allows the design and implementation of modular agents, where simple modules cooperate in the annotation of a large dataset without central coordination.
  • Social Media offer a vast amount of geo-located and time-stamped textual content directly generated by people. This information can be analysed to obtain insights about the general state of a large population of users and to address scientific questions from a diversity of disciplines. In this work, we estimate temporal patterns of mood variation through the use of emotionally loaded words contained in Twitter messages, possibly reflecting underlying circadian and seasonal rhythms in the mood of the users. We present a method for computing mood scores from text using affective word taxonomies, and apply it to millions of tweets collected in the United Kingdom during the seasons of summer and winter. Our analysis results in the detection of strong and statistically significant circadian patterns for all the investigated mood types. Seasonal variation does not seem to register any important divergence in the signals, but a periodic oscillation within a 24-hour period is identified for each mood type. The main common characteristic for all emotions is their mid-morning peak, however their mood score patterns differ in the evenings.