• Deep autoregressive models have shown state-of-the-art performance in density estimation for natural images on large-scale datasets such as ImageNet. However, such models require many thousands of gradient-based weight updates and unique image examples for training. Ideally, the models would rapidly learn visual concepts from only a handful of examples, similar to the manner in which humans learns across many vision tasks. In this paper, we show how 1) neural attention and 2) meta learning techniques can be used in combination with autoregressive models to enable effective few-shot density estimation. Our proposed modifications to PixelCNN result in state-of-the art few-shot density estimation on the Omniglot dataset. Furthermore, we visualize the learned attention policy and find that it learns intuitive algorithms for simple tasks such as image mirroring on ImageNet and handwriting on Omniglot without supervision. Finally, we extend the model to natural images and demonstrate few-shot image generation on the Stanford Online Products dataset.
  • The ability to train large-scale neural networks has resulted in state-of-the-art performance in many areas of computer vision. These results have largely come from computational break throughs of two forms: model parallelism, e.g. GPU accelerated training, which has seen quick adoption in computer vision circles, and data parallelism, e.g. A-SGD, whose large scale has been used mostly in industry. We report early experiments with a system that makes use of both model parallelism and data parallelism, we call GPU A-SGD. We show using GPU A-SGD it is possible to speed up training of large convolutional neural networks useful for computer vision. We believe GPU A-SGD will make it possible to train larger networks on larger training sets in a reasonable amount of time.