• We consider the frequency domain form of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) called spectral proper orthogonal decomposition (SPOD). Spectral POD is derived from a space-time POD problem for statistically stationary flows and leads to modes that each oscillate at a single frequency. This form of POD goes back to the original work of Lumley (Stochastic tools in turbulence, Academic Press, 1970), but has been overshadowed by a space-only form of POD since the 1990s. We clarify the relationship between these two forms of POD and show that SPOD modes represent structures that evolve coherently in space and time while space-only POD modes in general do not. We also establish a relationship between SPOD and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD); we show that SPOD modes are in fact optimally averaged DMD modes obtained from an ensemble DMD problem for stationary flows. Accordingly, SPOD modes represent structures that are dynamic in the same sense as DMD modes but also optimally account for the statistical variability of turbulent flows. Finally, we establish a connection between SPOD and resolvent analysis. The key observation is that the resolvent-mode expansion coefficients must be regarded as statistical quantities to ensure convergent approximations of the flow statistics. When the expansion coefficients are uncorrelated, we show that SPOD and resolvent modes are identical. Our theoretical results and the overall utility of SPOD are demonstrated using two example problems: the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation and a turbulent jet.
  • The dynamics of bubble clouds induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound are investigated in a regime where the cloud size is similar to the ultrasound wavelength. High-speed images show that the cloud is asymmetrical; the bubbles nearest the source grow to a larger radius than the distal ones. Similar structures of bubble clouds are observed in numerical simulations that mimic the laboratory experiment. To elucidate the structure, a parametric study is conducted for plane ultrasound waves with various amplitudes and diffuse clouds with different initial void fractions. Based on an analysis of the kinetic energy of liquid induced by bubble oscillations, a new scaling parameter is introduced to characterize the dynamics. The new parameter generalizes the cloud interaction parameter originally introduced by d'Agostino and Brennen (1989). The dynamic interaction parameter controls the energy localization and consequent anisoptropy of the cloud. Moreover, the amplitude of the far-field, bubble-scattered acoustics is likewise correlated with the proposed parameter. Findings of the present study not only shed light on the physics of cloud cavitation, but may also be of use to quantification of the effects of cavitation on outcomes of ultrasound therapies including HIFU-based lithotripsy.
  • Motivated by the problem of jet-flap interaction noise, we study the tonal dynamics that occur when a sharp edge is placed in the hydrodynamic nearfield of an isothermal turbulent jet. We perform hydrodynamic and acoustic pressure measurements in order to characterise the tones as a function of Mach number and streamwise edge position. The distribution of spectral peaks observed, as a function of Mach number, cannot be explained using the usual edge-tone scenario, in which resonance is underpinned by coupling between downstream-travelling Kelvin-Helmholtz wavepackets and upstream-travelling sound waves. We show, rather, that the strongest tones are due to coupling between the former and upstream-travelling jet modes recently studied by Towne et al. (2017) and Schmidt et al. (2017). We also study the band-limited nature of the resonance, showing a high-frequency cut-off to be due to the frequency dependence of the upstream-travelling waves. At high Mach number these become evanescent above a certain frequency, whereas at low Mach number they become progressively trapped with increasing frequency, a consequence of which is their not being reflected in the nozzle plane. Additionally, a weaker, low-frequency, forced-resonance regime is identified that involves the same upstream travelling jet modes but that couple, in this instance, with downstream-travelling sound waves. It is suggested that the existence of two resonance regimes may be due to the non-modal nature of wavepacket dynamics at low-frequency.
  • An inverted flag has its trailing edge clamped and exhibits dynamics distinct from that of a conventional flag, whose leading edge is restrained. We perform nonlinear simulations and a global stability analysis of the inverted-flag system for a range of Reynolds numbers, flag masses and stiffnesses. Our global stability analysis is based on a linearisation of the fully-coupled fluid-structure system of equations. The calculated equilibria are steady-state solutions of the fully-coupled nonlinear equations. By implementing this approach, we (i) explore the mechanisms that initiate flapping, (ii) study the role of vortex shedding and vortex-induced vibration (VIV) in large-amplitude flapping, and (iii) characterise the chaotic flapping regime. For point (i), we identify a deformed-equilibrium state and show through a global stability analysis that the onset of flapping is due to a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. For large-amplitude flapping, point (ii), we confirm the arguments of Sader et al. (2016) that for a range of parameters this regime is a VIV. We also show that there are other flow regimes for which large-amplitude flapping persists and is not a VIV. Specifically, flapping can occur at low Reynolds numbers ($<50$), albeit via a previously unexplored mechanism. Finally, with respect to point (iii), chaotic flapping has been observed experimentally for Reynolds numbers of $O(10^4)$, and here we show that chaos also persists at a moderate Reynolds number of 200. We characterise this chaotic regime and calculate its strange attractor, whose structure is controlled by the above-mentioned deformed equilibria and is similar to a Lorenz attractor. These results are contextualised with bifurcation diagrams that depict the different equilibria and various flapping regimes.
  • Simple aerodynamic configurations under even modest conditions can exhibit complex flows with a wide range of temporal and spatial features. It has become common practice in the analysis of these flows to look for and extract physically important features, or modes, as a first step in the analysis. This step typically starts with a modal decomposition of an experimental or numerical dataset of the flow field, or of an operator relevant to the system. We describe herein some of the dominant techniques for accomplishing these modal decompositions and analyses that have seen a surge of activity in recent decades. For a non-expert, keeping track of recent developments can be daunting, and the intent of this document is to provide an introduction to modal analysis that is accessible to the larger fluid dynamics community. In particular, we present a brief overview of several of the well-established techniques and clearly lay the framework of these methods using familiar linear algebra. The modal analysis techniques covered in this paper include the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), balanced proper orthogonal decomposition (Balanced POD), dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), Koopman analysis, global linear stability analysis, and resolvent analysis.
  • We present a strongly-coupled immersed-boundary method for flow-structure interaction problems involving thin deforming bodies. The method is stable for arbitrary choices of solid-to-fluid mass ratios and for large body motions. As with many strongly-coupled immersed-boundary methods, our method requires the solution of a nonlinear algebraic system at each time step. The system is solved through iteration, where the iterates are obtained by linearizing the system and performing a block LU factorization. This restricts all iterations to small-dimensional subsystems that scale with the number of discretization points on the immersed surface, rather than on the entire flow domain. Moreover, the iteration procedure we propose does not involve heuristic regularization parameters, and has converged in a small number of iterations for all problems we have considered. We derive our method for general deforming surfaces, and verify the method with two-dimensional test problems of geometrically nonlinear beams undergoing large amplitude flapping behavior.
  • A computationally efficient method for solving three-dimensional, viscous, incompressible flows on unbounded domains is presented. The method formally discretizes the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on an unbounded staggered Cartesian grid. Operations are limited to a finite computational domain through a lattice Green's function technique. This technique obtains solutions to inhomogeneous difference equations through the discrete convolution of source terms with the fundamental solutions of the discrete operators. The differential algebraic equations describing the temporal evolution of the discrete momentum equation and incompressibility constraint are numerically solved by combining an integrating factor technique for the viscous term and a half-explicit Runge-Kutta scheme for the convective term. A projection method that exploits the mimetic and commutativity properties of the discrete operators is used to efficiently solve the system of equations that arises in each stage of the time integration scheme. Linear complexity, fast computation rates, and parallel scalability are achieved using recently developed fast multipole methods for difference equations. The accuracy and physical fidelity of solutions is verified through numerical simulations of vortex rings.
  • A new parallel, computationally efficient immersed boundary method for solving three-dimensional, viscous, incompressible flows on unbounded domains is presented. Immersed surfaces with prescribed motions are generated using the interpolation and regularization operators obtained from the discrete delta function approach of the original (Peskin's) immersed boundary method. Unlike Peskin's method, boundary forces are regarded as Lagrange multipliers that are used to satisfy the no-slip condition. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are discretized on an unbounded staggered Cartesian grid and are solved in a finite number of operations using lattice Green's function techniques. These techniques are used to automatically enforce the natural free-space boundary conditions and to implement a novel block-wise adaptive grid that significantly reduces the run-time cost of solutions by limiting operations to grid cells in the immediate vicinity and near-wake region of the immersed surface. These techniques also enable the construction of practical discrete viscous integrating factors that are used in combination with specialized half-explicit Runge-Kutta schemes to accurately and efficiently solve the differential algebraic equations describing the discrete momentum equation, incompressibility constraint, and no-slip constraint. Linear systems of equations resulting from the time integration scheme are efficiently solved using an approximation-free nested projection technique. The algebraic properties of the discrete operators are used to reduce projection steps to simple discrete elliptic problems, e.g. discrete Poisson problems, that are compatible with recent parallel fast multipole methods for difference equations. Numerical experiments on low-aspect-ratio flat plates and spheres at Reynolds numbers up to 3,700 are used to verify the accuracy and physical fidelity of the formulation.
  • A new fast multipole formulation for solving elliptic difference equations on unbounded domains and its parallel implementation are presented. These difference equations can arise directly in the description of physical systems, e.g. crystal structures, or indirectly through the discretization of PDEs. In the analog to solving continuous inhomogeneous differential equations using Green's functions, the proposed method uses the fundamental solution of the discrete operator on an infinite grid, or lattice Green's function. Fast solutions $\mathcal{O}(N)$ are achieved by using a kernel-independent interpolation-based fast multipole method. Unlike other fast multipole algorithms, our approach exploits the regularity of the underlying Cartesian grid and the efficiency of FFTs to reduce the computation time. Our parallel implementation allows communications and computations to be overlapped and requires minimal global synchronization. The accuracy, efficiency, and parallel performance of the method are demonstrated through numerical experiments on the discrete 3D Poisson equation.
  • Many immersed boundary methods solve for surface stresses that impose the velocity boundary conditions on an immersed body. These surface stresses may contain spurious oscillations that make them ill-suited for representing the physical surface stresses on the body. Moreover, these inaccurate stresses often lead to unphysical oscillations in the history of integrated surface forces such as the coefficient of lift. While the errors in the surface stresses and forces do not necessarily affect the convergence of the velocity field, it is desirable, especially in fluid-structure interaction problems, to obtain smooth and convergent stress distributions on the surface. To this end, we show that the equation for the surface stresses is an integral equation of the first kind whose ill-posedness is the source of spurious oscillations in the stresses. We also demonstrate that for sufficiently smooth delta functions, the oscillations may be filtered out to obtain physically accurate surface stresses. The filtering is applied as a post-processing procedure, so that the convergence of the velocity field is unaffected. We demonstrate the efficacy of the method by computing stresses and forces that converge to the physical stresses and forces for several test problems.
  • The classical problem of suppressing vortex shedding in the wake of a circular cylinder by using body rotation is revisited in an adjoint-based optimal control framework. The cylinder's unsteady and fully unconstrained rotation rate is optimized at Reynolds numbers between 75 and 200 and over horizons that are longer than in previous studies, where they are typically of the order of a vortex shedding period or shorter. In the best configuration, the drag is reduced by 19%, the vortex shedding is effectively suppressed, and this low drag state is maintained with minimal cylinder rotation after transients. Unlike open-loop control, the optimal control is shown to maintain a specific phase relationship between the actuation and the shedding in order to stabilize the wake. A comparison is also given between the performance of optimizations for different Reynolds numbers, cost functions, and horizon lengths. It is shown that the long horizons used are necessary in order to stabilize the vortex shedding efficiently.