• We report on observations made with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) using background QSOs to probe the circum-galactic medium (CGM) around 17 low-redshift galaxies that are undergoing or have recently undergone a strong starburst (the COS-Burst program). The sightlines extend out to roughly the virial radius of the galaxy halo. We construct control samples of normal star-forming low-redshift galaxies from the COS/HST archive that match the starbursts in terms of galaxy stellar mass and impact parameter. We find clear evidence that the CGM around the starbursts differs systematically compared to the control galaxies. The Ly$\alpha$, Si III, C IV, and possibly O VI absorption-lines are stronger as a function of impact parameter, and the ratios of the equivalent widths of C IV/Ly$\alpha$ and Si III/Ly$\alpha$ are both larger than in normal star-forming galaxies. We also find that the widths and the velocity offsets (relative to $v_{sys}$) of the Ly$\alpha$ absorption-lines are significantly larger in the CGM of the starbursts, implying velocities of the absorbing material that are roughly twice the halo virial velocity. We show that these properties can be understood as a consequence of the interaction between a starburst-driven wind and the pre-existing CGM. These results underscore the importance of winds driven from intensely star-forming galaxies in helping drive the evolution of galaxies and the intergalactic medium. They also offer a new probe of the properties of starburst-driven winds and of the CGM itself.
  • We use the combined data from the COS-GASS and COS-Halos surveys to characterize the Circum-Galactic Medium (CGM) surrounding typical low-redshift galaxies in the mass range $\rm~M_*\sim~10^{9.5-11.5}~M_{\odot} $, and over a range of impact parameters extending to just beyond the halo virial radius ($\rm~R_{vir}$). We find the radial scale length of the distributions of the equivalent widths of the Lyman~$\alpha$ and Si III absorbers to be 0.9 and 0.4 $\rm~R_{vir}$, respectively. The radial distribution of equivalent widths is relatively uniform for the blue galaxies, but highly patchy (low covering fraction) for the red galaxies. We also find that the Lyman~$\alpha$ and Si III equivalent widths show significant positive correlations with the specific star-formation rate (sSFR) of the galaxy. We find a surprising lack of correlations between the halo mass (virial velocity) and either the velocity dispersions or velocity offsets of the Lyman~$\alpha$ lines. The ratio of the velocity offset to the velocity dispersion for the Lyman~$\alpha$ absorbers has a mean value of $\sim$ 4, suggesting that a given the line-of-sight is intersecting a dynamically coherent structure in the CGM rather than a sea of orbiting clouds. The kinematic properties of the CGM are similar in the blue and red galaxies, although we find that a significantly larger fraction of the blue galaxies have large Lyman~$\alpha$ velocity offsets (>200 km s$^{-1}$). We show that - if the CGM clouds represent future fuel for star-formation - our new results could imply a large drop in the specific star-formation rate across the galaxy mass-range we probe.
  • We present a systematic analysis of the rotation curves of 187 galaxies with masses greater than 10^10 M_sol, with atomic gas masses from the GALEX Arecibo Sloan Survey (GASS), and with follow-up long-slit spectroscopy from the MMT. Our analysis focuses on stellar rotation curves derived by fitting stellar template spectra to the galaxy spectra binned along the slit. In this way, we are able to obtain accurate rotation velocity measurements for a factor of 2 more galaxies than possible with the Halpha line. Galaxies with high atomic gas mass fractions are the most dark-matter dominated galaxies in our sample and have dark matter halo density profiles that are well fit by Navarro, Frenk & White profiles with an average concentration parameter of 10. The inner slopes and of the rotation curves correlate more strongly with stellar population age than with galaxy mass or structural parameters. At fixed stellar mass, the rotation curves of more actively star-forming galaxies have steeper inner slopes than less actively star-forming galaxies. The ratio between the galaxy specific angular momentum and the total specific angular momentum of its dark matter halo, R_j, correlates strongly with galaxy mass, structure and gas content. Low mass, disk-dominated galaxies with atomic gas mass fractions greater than 20% have median values of R_j of around 1, but massive, bulge-dominated galaxies have R_j=0.2-0.3. We argue that these trends can be understood in a picture where gas inflows triggered by disk instabilities lead to the formation of passive, bulge-dominated galaxies with low specific angular momentum.
  • We summarize what large surveys of the contemporary universe have taught us about the physics and phenomenology of the processes that link the formation and evolution of galaxies and their central supermassive black holes. We present a picture in which the population of AGN can be divided into two distinct populations. The Radiative-Mode AGN are associated with black holes that produce radiant energy powered by accretion at rates in excess of ~1% of the Eddington Limit. They are primarily associated with less massive black holes growing in high-density pseudo-bulges at a rate sufficient to produce the total mass budget in these black holes in ~10 Gyr. The circum-nuclear environment contains high density cold gas and associated star-formation. Major mergers are not the primary mechanism for transporting this gas inward; secular processes appear dominant. Stellar feedback will be generic in these objects and strong AGN feedback is seen only in the most powerful AGN. In Jet-Mode AGN the bulk of energetic output takes the form of collimated outflows (jets). These AGN are associated with the more massive black holes in more massive (classical) bulges and elliptical galaxies. Neither the accretion onto these black holes nor star-formation in their host bulge is significant today. These AGN are probably fueled by the accretion of slowly cooling hot gas that is limited by the feedback/heating provided by AGN radio sources. Surveys of the high-redshift universe are painting a similar picture. (Abridged).
  • The Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is a massively-multiplexed fiber-fed optical and near-infrared 3-arm spectrograph (N_fiber=2400, 380<lambda<1260nm, 1.3 degree diameter FoV), offering unique opportunities in survey astronomy. Here we summarize the science case feasible for a survey of Subaru 300 nights. We describe plans to constrain the nature of dark energy via a survey of emission line galaxies spanning a comoving volume of 9.3 (Gpc/h)^3 in the redshift range 0.8<z<2.4. In each of 6 redshift bins, the cosmological distances will be measured to 3% precision via BAO, and redshift-space distortions will be used to constrain structure growth to 6% precision. In the GA program, radial velocities and chemical abundances of stars in the Milky Way and M31 will be used to infer the past assembly histories of spiral galaxies and the structure of their dark matter halos. Data will be secured for 10^6 stars in the Galactic thick-disk, halo and tidal streams as faint as V~22, including stars with V < 20 to complement the goals of the Gaia mission. A medium-resolution mode with R = 5000 to be implemented in the red arm will allow the measurement of multiple alpha-element abundances and more precise velocities for Galactic stars, elucidating the detailed chemo-dynamical structure and evolution of each of the main stellar components of the Milky Way Galaxy and of its dwarf spheroidal galaxies. For the extragalactic program, our simulations suggest the wide avelength range will be powerful in probing the galaxy population and its clustering over a wide redshift range. We propose to conduct a color-selected survey of 1<z<2 galaxies and AGN over 16 deg^2 to J~23.4, yielding a fair sample of galaxies with stellar masses above ~10^{10}Ms at z~2. A two-tiered survey of higher redshift LBGs and LAEs will quantify the properties of early systems close to the reionization epoch.
  • We develop a model for the distribution of the ISM and star formation in galaxies based on recent studies that indicate that galactic disks stabilise to a constant stability parameter, which we combine with prescriptions of how the phases of the ISM are determined and for the Star Formation Law (SFL). The model predicts the gas surface mass density and star formation intensity of a galaxy given its rotation curve, stellar surface mass density and the gas velocity dispersion. This model is tested on radial profiles of neutral and molecular ISM surface mass density and star formation intensity of 12 galaxies selected from the THINGS sample. Our tests focus on intermediate radii. Nevertheless, the model produces reasonable agreement with ISM mass and star formation rate integrated over the central region in all but one case. To optimise the model, we evaluate four recipes for the stability parameter, three recipes for apportioning the ISM into molecular and neutral components, and eight versions of the SFL. We find no clear-cut best prescription for the two-fluid (gas and stars) stability parameter Q_2f and therefore for simplicity, we use the Wang&Silk(1994) approximation (Q_WS). We found that an empirical scaling between the molecular to neutral ISM ratio (R_mol) and the stellar surface mass density proposed by Leroy et al. (2008) works marginally better than the other two prescriptions for this ratio in predicting the ISM profiles, and noticeably better in predicting star formation intensity from the ISM profiles produced by our model with the SFLs we tested. Thus in the context of our modeled ISM profiles, the linear molecular SFL and the two-component SFL (Krumholz et al. 2009) work better than the other prescriptions we tested. We incorporate these relations into our `Constant Q disk' (CQ-disk) model.
  • We present the design and performance of the multi-object fiber spectrographs for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and their upgrade for the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Originally commissioned in Fall 1999 on the 2.5-m aperture Sloan Telescope at Apache Point Observatory, the spectrographs produced more than 1.5 million spectra for the SDSS and SDSS-II surveys, enabling a wide variety of Galactic and extra-galactic science including the first observation of baryon acoustic oscillations in 2005. The spectrographs were upgraded in 2009 and are currently in use for BOSS, the flagship survey of the third-generation SDSS-III project. BOSS will measure redshifts of 1.35 million massive galaxies to redshift 0.7 and Lyman-alpha absorption of 160,000 high redshift quasars over 10,000 square degrees of sky, making percent level measurements of the absolute cosmic distance scale of the Universe and placing tight constraints on the equation of state of dark energy. The twin multi-object fiber spectrographs utilize a simple optical layout with reflective collimators, gratings, all-refractive cameras, and state-of-the-art CCD detectors to produce hundreds of spectra simultaneously in two channels over a bandpass covering the near ultraviolet to the near infrared, with a resolving power R = \lambda/FWHM ~ 2000. Building on proven heritage, the spectrographs were upgraded for BOSS with volume-phase holographic gratings and modern CCD detectors, improving the peak throughput by nearly a factor of two, extending the bandpass to cover 360 < \lambda < 1000 nm, and increasing the number of fibers from 640 to 1000 per exposure. In this paper we describe the original SDSS spectrograph design and the upgrades implemented for BOSS, and document the predicted and measured performances.
  • We present a study exploring the impact of a starburst on the properties of the surrounding circum-galactic medium (CGM): gas located beyond the galaxy's stellar body and extending out to the virial radius (200 kpc). We obtained ultraviolet spectroscopic data from the Cosmic Origin Spectrograph (COS) probing the CGM of 20 low-redshift foreground galaxies using background QSOs. Our sample consists of starburst and control galaxies. The latter comprises normal star-forming and passive galaxies with similar stellar masses and impact parameters as the starbursts. We used optical spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey(SDSS) to estimate the properties of the starbursts, inferring average ages of 200 Myrs and burst fractions involving ~10% of their stellar mass. The COS data reveal highly ionized gas traced by CIV in 80%(4/5) of the starburst and in 17%(2/12) of the control sample. The two control galaxies with CIV absorbers differed from the four starbursts in showing multiple low-ionization transitions and strong saturated Lyman-alpha lines. They therefore appear to be physically different systems. We show that the CIV absorbers in the starburst CGM represent a significant baryon repository. The high detection rate of this highly ionized material in the starbursts suggests that starburst-driven winds can affect the CGM out to radii as large as 200 kpc. This is plausible given the inferred properties of the starbursts and the known properties of starburst-driven winds. This would represent the first direct observational evidence of local starbursts impacting the bulk of their gaseous halos, and as such provides new evidence of the importance of this kind of feedback in the evolution of galaxies.
  • A search for emission lines in foreground galaxies in quasar spectra (z(gal) < z(QSO)) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 5 (DR5) reveals 23 examples of quasars shining through low redshift, foreground galaxies at small impact parameters (< 10 kpc). About 74,000 quasar spectra were examined by searching for narrow H{\alpha} emission lines at z < 0.38, at a flux level greater than 5 \times 10^-17 ergs cm^-2 s^-1, then confirming that other expected emission lines of the H II regions in the galaxy are detected. The galaxies were deblended from the quasar images to get colors and morphologies. For cases that allow the galaxy and the quasar to be deblended, the galaxies are blue (0.95 <(u-r)< 1.95). Extinction and reddening through the galaxies is determined from the (g-i) color excesses of the quasars. These reddening values are compared with the flux ratio of H{\alpha} to H{\beta}, which reflect the extinction for an undetermined fraction of the sightline through each galaxy. No trends were found relating E(B-V)_(g-i), impact parameter (b), and (u-r) for the galaxies or between E(B-V) derived from (g-i) and that derived from H{\alpha}/H{\beta}. Comparison with previous studies of quasar absorption systems indicate our sample is more reddened, suggesting disk-dominated absorber galaxies. Measurement or limits on galactic, interstellar Ca II and Na I absorption lines are given from the quasar spectrum. No trends were found relating Ca II equivalent width (W (Ca II)) or Na I equivalent width (W (Na I)) to b, but a correlation of r_s = -0.77 ({\alpha} = 0.05) was found relating W (Ca II) and E(B-V)(g-i) .
  • Large optical surveys provide an unprecedented census of galaxies in the local Universe, forming an invaluable framework into which more detailed studies of objects can be placed. But how useful are optical surveys for understanding the co-evolution of black holes and galaxies, given their limited wavelength coverage, selection criteria, and depth? In this conference paper I present work-in-progress comparing optical and mid-IR diagnostics of three "unusual" low redshift populations (luminous Seyferts, dusty Balmer-strong AGN, ULIRGs) with a set of ordinary star-forming galaxies from the SDSS. I address the questions: How well do the mid-infrared and optical diagnostics of star formation and AGN strength agree? To what extent do optical surveys allow us to include extreme, dusty, morphologically disturbed galaxies in our "complete" census of black hole-galaxy co-evolution?
  • We investigate the clustering properties of a complete sample of 10^5 star-forming galaxies drawn from the SDSS DR4. On scales less than 100 kpc, the amplitude of the correlation function exhibits a strong dependence on the specific star formation rate of the galaxy. We interpret this as the signature of enhanced star formation induced by tidal interactions. We then explore how the average star formation rate in a galaxy is enhanced as the projected separation r_p between the galaxy and its companions decreases. We find that the enhancement depends strongly on r_p, but very weakly on the relative luminosity of the companions. The enhancement is also stronger in low mass galaxies than in high mass galaxies. In order to explore whether a tidal interaction is not only sufficient, but also necessary to trigger enhanced star formation in a galaxy, we compute background subtracted neighbour counts for the galaxies in our sample. The average number of close neighbours around galaxies with low to average values of SFR/M* is close to zero. At the highest specific star formation rates, however, more than 40% of the galaxies in our sample have a companion within a projected radius of 100 kpc. Visual inspection of the highest SFR/M* galaxies without companions reveals that more than 50% of these are clear interacting or merging systems. We conclude that tidal interactions are the dominant trigger of enhanced star formation in the most strongly star-forming systems. Finally, we find clear evidence that tidal interactions not only lead to enhanced star formation in galaxies, but also cause structural changes such as an increase in concentration.
  • We investigate the production of nitrogen in star forming galaxies with ultraviolet (UV) radiation detected by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer Satellite (GALEX). We use a sample of 8,745 GALEX emission line galaxies matched to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic sample. We derive both gas-phase oxygen and nitrogen abundances for the sample, and apply stellar population synthesis models to derive stellar masses and star formation histories of the galaxies. We compare oxygen abundances derived using three different diagnostics. We derive the specific star formation rates of the galaxies by modeling the 7-band GALEX+SDSS photometry. We find that galaxies that have log SFR/M$_*$ > -10.0 typically have values of log N/O ~0.05 dex less than galaxies with log SFR/M$_*$ < -10.0 and similar oxygen abundances.
  • We examine the relationship between galaxies, supermassive black holes and AGN using a sample of 22,000 narrow-emission-line AGN drawn from a a sample of 122,000 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We have studied how AGN host properties compare with those of normal galaxies and how they depend on the luminosity of the active nucleus. We find that AGN reside in massive galaxies and have distributions of sizes and concentrations that are similar to those of the early-type galaxies in our sample. The host galaxies of low-luminosity AGN have stellar populations similar to normal early-types. The hosts of high-luminosity AGN have much younger mean stellar ages and a significant fraction have experienced recent starbursts. High-luminosity AGN are also found in lower density environments. We use the stellar velocity dispersions of the AGN hosts to estimate black hole masses and their [OIII]$\lambda$5007 emission line luminosities to estimate black hole accretion rates. We find that the volume averaged ratio of star formation to black hole accretion is ~1000, in remarkable agreement with the observed ratio of stellar mass to black hole mass in nearby bulges. Our estimated accretion rates imply that low mass black holes are growing on a timescale that is comparable to the age of the Universe. The growth timescale increases by more than an order of magnitude for the most massive black holes in our sample. We conclude that the evolution of the AGN luminosity function is driven by a decrease in the characteristic mass scale of actively accreting black holes.
  • We present a study of the stellar population in Low Luminosity AGN (LLAGN). Our goal is to search for spectroscopic signatures of young and intermediate age stars, and to investigate their relationship with the ionization mechanism in LLAGN. The method used is based on the stellar population synthesis of the optical continuum of the innermost (20-100 pc) regions in these galaxies. For this purpose, we have collected high spatial resolution optical (2900-5700 A) STIS spectra of 28 nearby LLAGN that are available in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. The analysis of these data is compared with a similar analysis also presented here for 51 ground-based spectra of LLAGN. Our main findings are: (1) No features due to Wolf-Rayet stars were convincingly detected in the STIS spectra. (2) Young stars contribute very little to the optical continuum in the ground-based aperture. However, the fraction of light provided by these stars is higher than 10% in most of the weak-[OI] LLAGN STIS spectra. (3) Intermediate age stars contribute significantly to the optical continuum of these nuclei. This population is more frequent in objects with weak than with strong [OI]. Weak-[OI] LLAGN that have young stars stand out for their intermediate age population. (4) Most of the strong-[OI] LLAGN have predominantly old stellar population. A few of these objects also show a feature-less continuum that contributes significantly to the optical continuum. These results suggest that young and intermediate age stars do not play a significant role in the ionization of LLAGN with strong [OI]. However, the ionization in weak-[OI] LLAGN with young and/or intermediate age population could be due to stellar processes.
  • (Abridge): We present a spectroscopic study of the stellar populations of Low Luminosity AGN (LLAGN). Our main goal is to determine whether the stars who live in the innermost (100 pc-scale) regions of these galaxies are in some way related to the emission line properties, which would imply a link between the stellar population and the ionization mechanism. High signal to noise, ground based long-slit spectra in the 3500--5500 A interval were collected for 60 galaxies.Our main findings are: (1) Few LLAGN have a detectable young (< 10 Myr) starburst component, indicating that very massive stars do not contribute significantly to the optical continuum. In particular, no features due to Wolf-Rayet stars were convincingly detected. (2) High Order Balmer absorption lines of HI (HOBLs), on the other hand, are detected in 40% of LLAGN. These features, which are strongest in 100 Myr--1 Gyr intermediate age stellar populations, are accompanied by diluted metal absorption lines and bluer colors than other objects in the sample. (3) These intermediate age populations are very common (50 %) in LLAGN with relatively weak [OI] emission, but rare (10 %) in LLAGN with stronger [OI]. This is intriguing since LLAGN with weak [OI] have been previously hypothesized to be ``transition objects'' in which both an AGN and young stars contribute to the emission-line excitation. Massive stars, if present, are completely outshone by intermediate age and old stars in the optical. This happens in at least a couple of objects where independent UV spectroscopy detects young starbursts not seen in the optical. (4) Objects with predominantly old stars span the whole range of [OI]/Halpha values, but (5) sources with significant young and/or intermediate age populations are nearly all (90%) weak [OI] emitters.
  • We have obtained high-spatial resolution ultraviolet and optical STIS spectroscopy and imaging of the metal-rich nuclear starburst in NGC3049. The stellar continuum and the absorption line spectrum in the ultraviolet are used to constrain the massive stellar population. The strong, blueshifted stellar lines of CIV and SiIV detected in the UV spectra indicate a metal-rich, compact, massive (1E6 Msol) cluster of age 3--4 Myr emitting the UV-optical continuum. We find strong evidence against a depletion of massive stars in this metal-rich cluster. The derived age and the upper mass-limit cut-off of the initial mass function are also consistent with the detection of Wolf-Rayet (WR) features at optical wavelengths. As a second independentconstraint on the massive stellar content, the nebular emission-line spectrum is modeled with photoionization codes using stellar spectra from evolutionary synthesis models. However, the nebular lines are badly reproduced by 3--4 Myr instantaneous bursts, as required by the UV line spectrum, when unblanketed WR and/or Kurucz stellar atmospheres are used. The corresponding number of photons above 24 and 54 eV in the synthetic models is too high in comparison with values suggested by the observed line ratios. Since the ionizing spectrum in this regime is dominated by emission from WR stars, this discrepancy between observations and models is most likely the result of incorrect assumptions about the WR stars. Thus we conclude that the nebular spectrum of high-metallicity starbursts is poorly reproduced by models for WR dominated populations. However, the new model set of Smith et al. (2002) with blanketed WR and O atmospheres and adjusted WR temperatures predicts a softer far-UV radiation field, providing a better match to the data.
  • (Abridged) We present deep, Chandra spectral imaging of the dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 1569. The unprecedented spatial resolution allows us to spatially identify the components of the integrated \x spectrum. Fitted spectral models require an intrinsic absorption component and higher metal abundances than previous studies indicated. Our results provide the first direct evidence for metal-enriched winds from dwarf starburst galaxies.
  • Deep H$\alpha$ images of a sample of nearby late-type spiral galaxies have been analyzed to characterize the morphology and energetic significance of the ``Diffuse Ionized Medium'' (DIM). We find that the DIM properties can be reasonably unified as a function of relative surface brightness, by using a new method to quantify the DIM importance in galaxies. This new approach is more consistent with the fundamentally morphological definition of the DIM as being `Diffuse', compared to the traditional way adopted in previous studies that could only isolate the DIM based on an absolute surface brightness criterion. Our results suggest that the variation of the DIM's significance among the galaxies is small enough so that the fractional contribution of the DIM to the global H$\alpha$ luminosity in the galaxies is fairly constant, as has been observed. We found a smooth structural transition from HII regions to the DIM, suggesting that the ionizing energy for the DIM mainly comes from HII regions.
  • We present and discuss HST (WFPC2 and FOC) images and UV GHRS spectra plus ground-based near UV through to near IR spectra of three Seyfert 2 nuclei (NGC 7130, NGC 5135 and IC 3639). These galaxies, together to Mrk 477, were selected from a bigger sample that comprises the 20 brightest Seyfert 2 nuclei, with the goal to study the origin of the UV-optical-near IR featureless continuum in Seyfert 2 nuclei. These four galaxies have bolometric luminosities, as computed with the four IRAS bands, of 10^11 Lsol. They are close enough to be resolved with HST the nuclear zone. This makes these Seyfert 2 galaxies benchmarks to study the Starburst-AGN connection in more distant galaxies. The data provide direct evidence of the existence of a central nuclear starburst that dominates the UV light, and that seem to be responsible for the origin of the so called featureless continuum. These starbursts are dusty and compact. They have sizes (from less than 100 pc to a few hundred pc) much smaller and closer to the nucleus than that seen in the prototype Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. The bolometric luminosity of these starbursts is similar to the estimated bolometric luminosities of their obscured Seyfert 1 nuclei, and thus they contribute in the same amount to the overall energetics of these galaxies.