• We have performed a set of simulations of expanding, spherically symmetric nebulae inflated by winds from accreting black holes in ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). We implemented a realistic cooling function to account for free-free and bound-free cooling. For all model parameters we considered, the forward shock in the interstellar medium becomes radiative at a radius $\sim $ 100 pc. The emission is primarily in the optical and UV, and the radiative luminosity is about 50% of the total kinetic luminosity of the wind. In contrast, the reverse shock in the wind is adiabatic so long as the terminal outflow velocity of the wind $v_{\rm w} \sim 0.003c$. The shocked wind in these models radiates in X-rays, but with a luminosity of only $\sim 10^{35} \rm\,erg\,s^{-1}$. For wind velocities $v_{\rm w} \sim 0.001c$, the shocked wind becomes radiative, but it is no longer hot enough to produce X-rays. Instead it emits in optical and UV, and the radiative luminosity is comparable to 100% of the wind kinetic luminosity. We suggest that measuring the optical luminosities and putting limits on the X-ray and radio emission from shock-ionized ULX bubbles may help in estimating the mass outflow rate of the central accretion disk and the velocity of the outflow.
  • We review observations of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). X-ray spectroscopic and timing studies of ULXs suggest a new accretion state distinct from those seen in Galactic stellar-mass black hole binaries. The detection of coherent pulsations indicates the presence of neutron-star accretors in three ULXs and therefore apparently super-Eddington luminosities. Optical and X-ray line profiles of ULXs and the properties of associated radio and optical nebulae suggest that ULXs produce powerful outflows, also indicative of super-Eddington accretion. We discuss models of super-Eddington accretion and their relation to the observed behaviors of ULXs. We review the evidence for intermediate mass black holes in ULXs. We consider the implications of ULXs for super-Eddington accretion in active galactic nuclei, heating of the early universe, and the origin of the black hole binary recently detected via gravitational waves.
  • The luminosity range at and just below the 10^39 erg/s cut-off for defining ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) is a little-explored regime. It none-the-less hosts a large number of X-ray sources, and has great potential for improving our understanding of sources with ~Eddington accretion rates. We select a sample of four sources in this Eddington Threshold regime with good data for further study; these objects possess a variety of soft spectral shapes. We perform X-ray spectral and timing analysis on the XMM-Newton and Chandra data for these objects to gain insight into their accretion mechanisms, and also examine their optical counterparts using HST images. NGC 300 X-1 is a highly luminous and well-known example of the canonical steep power-law accretion state. M51 ULS exhibits a cool blackbody-like spectrum and is consistent with being an ultraluminous supersoft source (ULS), possibly a super-Eddington accreting object viewed at a high inclination through an optically thick outflowing wind. NGC 4395 ULX-1 and NGC 6946 ULX-1 have unusually steep power-law tails, for which we discuss a variety of possible physical mechanisms and links to similar features in Galactic microquasars, and we conclude that these sources are likely intermediate objects between the soft ultraluminous regime of ULXs and classic ULSs.
  • The faintest ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), those with 0.3-10 keV luminosities 1 < L_X/10^39 < 3 erg s^-1, tend to have X-ray spectra that are disk-like but broader than expected for thin accretion disks. These `broadened disk' spectra are thought to indicate near- or mildly super-Eddington accretion onto stellar remnant black holes. Here we report that a sample of bright thermal-dominant black hole binaries, which have Eddington ratios constrained to moderate values, also show broadened disk spectra in the 0.3-10 keV band at an order of magnitude lower luminosities. This broadening would be missed in studies that only look above ~2 keV. While this may suggest that broadened disk ULXs could be powered by accretion onto massive stellar remnant black holes with close to maximal spin, we argue in favor of a scenario where they are at close to the Eddington luminosity, such that radiation pressure would be expected to result in geometrically slim, advective accretion disks. However, this implies that an additional physical mechanism is required to produce the observed broad spectra at low Eddington ratios.
  • ULX-7, in the northern spiral arm of M51, demonstrates unusual behaviour for an ultraluminous X-ray source, with a hard X-ray spectrum but very high short-term variability. This suggests that it is not in a typical ultraluminous state. We analyse the source using archival data from XMM-Newton, Chandra and NuSTAR, and by examining optical and radio data from HST and VLA. Our X-ray spectral analysis shows that the source has a hard power-law spectral shape with a photon index Gamma~1.5, which persists despite the source's X-ray luminosity varying by over an order of magnitude. The power spectrum of the source features a break at 6.5^{+0.5}_{-1.1}x10^-3 Hz, from a low-frequency spectral index of alpha_1=-0.1^{+0.5}_{-0.2} to a high-frequency spectral index of alpha_2=0.65^{+0.05}_{-0.14}, making it analogous to the low-frequency break found in the power spectra of low/hard state black holes (BHs). We can take a lower frequency limit for a corresponding high-frequency break to calculate a BH mass upper limit of 1.6x10^3 solar masses. Using the X-ray/radio fundamental plane we calculate another upper limit to the BH mass of 3.5x10^4 solar masses for a BH in the low/hard state. The hard spectrum, high rms variability and mass limits are consistent with ULX-7 being an intermediate-mass BH; however we cannot exclude other interpretations of this source's interesting behaviour, most notably a neutron star with an extreme accretion rate.
  • If ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are powered by accretion onto stellar remnant black holes, then many must be accreting at super-Eddington rates. It is predicted that such high accretion rates should give rise to massive, radiatively-driven winds. However, observational evidence of a wind, in the form of absorption or emission features, has remained elusive. As such, the reported detection of X-ray spectral residuals in XMM-Newton spectra of NGC 5408 X-1, which could be related to absorption in a wind is potentially very exciting. However, it has previously been assumed by several authors that these features simply originate from background diffuse plasma emission related to star-formation in the ULX's host galaxy. In this work we utilise the spatial resolving power of Chandra to test whether we can rule out this latter interpretation. We demonstrate that the majority of the luminosity in these spectral features is emitted from a highly localised region close to the ULX, and appears point-like even with Chandra. It is therefore highly likely that the spectral features are associated with the ULX itself, and little of the flux in this spectral component originates from spatially extended emission in the host galaxy. This may be consistent with the suggestion of absorption in an optically thin phase of a super-Eddington wind. Alternatively, we could be seeing emission from collisionally ionised material close to the black hole, but critically this would be difficult to reconcile with models where the source inclination largely determines the observed X-ray spectral and timing properties.
  • The lack of unambiguous detections of atomic features in the X-ray spectra of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) has proven a hindrance in diagnosing the nature of the accretion flow. The possible association of spectral residuals at soft energies with atomic features seen in absorption and/or emission and potentially broadened by velocity dispersion could therefore hold the key to understanding much about these enigmatic sources. Here we show for the first time that such residuals are seen in several sources and appear extremely similar in shape, implying a common origin. Via simple arguments we assert that emission from extreme colliding winds, absorption in a shell of material associated with the ULX nebula and thermal plasma emission associated with star formation are all highly unlikely to provide an origin. Whilst CCD spectra lack the energy resolution necessary to directly determine the nature of the features (i.e. formed of a complex of narrow lines or intrinsically broad), studying the evolution of the residuals with underlying spectral shape allows for an important, indirect test for their origin. The ULX NGC 1313 X-1 provides the best opportunity to perform such a test due to the dynamic range in spectral hardness provided by archival observations. We show through highly simplified spectral modelling that the strength of the features (in either absorption or emission) appears to anti-correlate with spectral hardness, which would rule out an origin via reflection of a primary continuum and instead supports a picture of atomic transitions in a wind or nearby material associated with such an outflow.
  • The luminosities of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) require an exotic solution with either super-critical accretion modes onto stellar mass black holes or sub-critical accretion onto intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs) being invoked. Discriminating between the two is non-trivial due to the present lack of a direct mass measurement. A key expectation of the super-critical mode of accretion is the presence of powerful radiatively-driven winds. Here we analyse XMM-Newton data from NGC 5408 X-1 and NGC 6946 X-1 and find that strong soft residuals present in the X-ray spectra can be reconciled with broadened, blue-shifted absorption by a partially ionised, optically thin phase of this wind. We derive initial values for the physical parameters of the wind; we also discuss other possible origins for the observed features.
  • We present a photometric survey of the optical counterparts of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) observed with the Hubble Space Telescope in nearby (< 5 Mpc) galaxies. Of the 33 ULXs with Hubble & Chandra data, 9 have no visible counterpart, placing limits on their M_V of ~ -4 to -9, enabling us to rule out O-type companions in 4 cases. The refined positions of two ULXs place them in the nucleus of their host galaxy. They are removed from our sample. Of the 22 remaining ULXs, 13 have one possible optical counterpart, while multiple are visible within the error regions of other ULXs. By calculating the number of chance coincidences, we estimate that 13 +/- 5 are the true counterparts. We attempt to constrain the nature of the companions by fitting the SED and M_V to obtain candidate spectral types. We can rule out O-type companions in 20 cases, while we find that one ULX (NGC 253 ULX2) excludes all OB-type companions. Fitting with X-ray irradiated models provides constraints on the donor star mass and radius. For 7 ULXs, we are able to impose inclination-dependent upper and/or lower limits on the black holes mass, if the extinction to the assumed companion star is not larger than the Galactic column. These are NGC 55 ULX1, NGC 253 ULX1, NGC 253 ULX2, NGC 253 XMM6, Ho IX X-1, IC342 X-1 & NGC 5204 X-1. This suggests that 10 ULXs do not have O companions, while none of the 18 fitted rule out B-type companions.
  • A subset of ultraluminous X-ray sources (those with luminosities < 10^40 erg/s) are thought to be powered by the accretion of gas onto black holes with masses of ~5-20 M_solar, probably via an accretion disc. The X-ray and radio emission are coupled in such Galactic sources, with the radio emission originating in a relativistic jet thought to be launched from the innermost regions near the black hole, with the most powerful emission occurring when the rate of infalling matter approaches a theoretical maximum (the Eddington limit). Only four such maximal sources are known in the Milky Way, and the absorption of soft X-rays in the interstellar medium precludes determining the causal sequence of events that leads to the ejection of the jet. Here we report radio and X-ray observations of a bright new X-ray source whose peak luminosity can exceed 10^39 erg/s in the nearby galaxy, M31. The radio luminosity is extremely high and shows variability on a timescale of tens of minutes, arguing that the source is highly compact and powered by accretion close to the Eddington limit onto a stellar mass black hole. Continued radio and X-ray monitoring of such sources should reveal the causal relationship between the accretion flow and the powerful jet emission.
  • CAL83 is a prototype of the class of Super Soft X-ray Sources (SXS). It is a binary consisting of a low mass secondary that is transferring mass onto a white dwarf primary and is the only known SXS surrounded by an ionisation nebula, made up of the interstellar medium (ISM) ionised by the source itself. With the VIMOS IFU we obtained spectra over a 25\times25" field of view, encompassing one quarter of the nebula. Emission line maps - H I, He II, [O III], [N II], and [S II] - are produced in order to study the morphology of the ionised gas. We include CAL83 on diagrams of various diagnostic ion ratios to compare it to other X-ray ionised sources. Finally we computed some simple models of the ionised gas around CAL83 and compare the predicted to the observed spectra. CAL83 appears to have a fairly standard ionisation nebula as far as the morphology goes: the edges where H is recombining are strong in the low stage ionisation lines and the central, clumpy regions are stronger in the higher stage ionisation lines. But the He II emission is unusual in being confined to one side of CAL83 rather than being homogeneously distributed as with the other ions. We model the CAL83 nebula with cloudy using model parameters for SXSs found in the literature. The He II emission does not fit in with model predictions; in fact none of the models is able to fit the observed spectrum very well. The spectral line images of the region surrounding CAL83 are revealing and instructive. However, more modelling of the spectrum of the ionised gas is necessary, and especially for the high-ionisation level emission from CAL83. In particular, we wish to know if the He II emission and the other nebular lines are powered by the same ionising source.
  • The role of environmentally induced gas stripping in driving galaxy evolution in groups remains poorly understood. Here we present extensive Chandra and Very Large Array mosaic observations of the hot and cold interstellar medium within the members of the nearby, X-ray bright NGC 2563 group, a prime target for studies of the role of gas stripping and interactions in relatively small host halos. Our observations cover nearly all group members within a projected radius of 1.15 Mpc (~1.4 R_vir) of the group center, down to a limiting X-ray luminosity and HI mass of 3e39 erg/s and 2e8 M_sun, respectively. The X-ray data are consistent with efficient ram pressure stripping of the hot gas halos of early-type galaxies near the group core, but no X-ray tails are seen and the limited statistics preclude strong conclusions. The HI results suggest moderate HI mass loss from the group members when compared to similar field galaxies. Six of the 20 HI-detected group members show HI evidence of ongoing interactions with other galaxies or with the intragroup medium. Suggestive evidence is further seen for galaxies with close neighbors in position-velocity space to show relatively low HI content, consistent with tidal removal of HI. The results thus indicate removal of both hot and cold gas from the group members via a combination of ram pressure stripping and tidal interactions. We also find that 16 of the 20 HI detections occur on one side of the group, reflecting an unusual morphological segregation whose origin remains unclear.
  • A new, transient ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) was recently discovered by Chandra in M31 with a luminosity at ~ 5 x 10^39 erg/s. Here we analyse a series of five subsequent XMM-Newton observations. The steady decline in X-ray luminosity over 1.5 months gives an observed e-fold timescale of ~40 days; similar to the decay timescales seen in soft X-ray transients in our own Galaxy. This supports the interpretation of this ULX as a stellar mass black hole in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB), accreting at super Eddington rates. This is further supported by the lack of detection of an O/B star in quiescence and the XMM-Newton spectral data being dominated by a disc-like component rather than the power-law expected from a sub-Eddington intermediate-mass black hole. These data give the best sequence of high Eddington fraction spectra ever assembled due to the combination of low absorption column to M31 and well calibrated bandpass down to 0.3 keV of XMM-Newton. The spectra can be roughly described by our best current disc model, BHSPEC, assuming a 10 M_solar black hole with best fit spin of ~0.4. However, the data are better described by a two component model, where the disc emission is significantly affected by advection, and with an additional low temperature Comptonisation component at high energies. This could simply indicate the limitations of current disc models, though the energy-dependent variability also weakly supports a two component interpretation of the data. Irrespective of the detailed interpretation of the spectral properties, these data support the presence of accretion onto a stellar mass black hole in a LMXB accreting in the Eddington-regime. This allows an unambiguous connection of this object, and, by extension, similar low luminosity ULXs, to `standard' X-ray binaries.
  • The bright X-ray source, 2XMMi J180438.7-145647 is fortunate to have long baseline observations in INTEGRAL that compliment observations taken by other missions. Optical spectroscopy of this object has suggested a distance of ~7 kpc and an identification with a low mass X-ray binary. We instead use the X-ray data from 0.3-40 keV to identify the source as a bright intermediate polar (IP) with an estimate for the white dwarf mass of~0.60 M_solar. This identification is supported by the presence of an iron triplet, the component lines of which are some of the strongest seen in IPs; and the signature of the spin period of the white dwarf at ~24 mins. We note that the lack of broad-band variability may suggest that this object is a stream-fed IP, similar in many respects to the well studied IP, V2400 Oph. Phase-binning has allowed us to create spectra corresponding to the peaks and troughs of the lightcurve from which we determine that the spectra appear harder in the troughs, consistent with the behaviour of other IPs binned on their spin periods. This work strongly suggests a mis-identification in the optical due to the presence of large columns of enshrouding material. We instead propose a distance to the source of <2.5 kpc to be consistent with the luminosities of other IPs in the dim, hard state. The relatively high flux of the source together with the strength of the iron lines may, in future, allow the source to be used to diagnose the properties of the shock heated plasma and the reflected component of the emission.
  • We explore the nature of ultraluminous X-ray sources through detailed investigations of their spectral shape using some of the highest quality data available in the XMM-Newton public archives. Phenomenological models allow us to characterise their spectra, while more 'physically-motivated' models enable us to explore the physical processes underlying these characteristics. These physical models imply the presence of extreme (probably super-Eddington) accretion on to stellar mass black holes.
  • We report [O III] 5007 Angstrom and [N II] 6583 Angstrom emission from a globular cluster harboring the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) CXOJ033831.8-352604 in the Fornax elliptical galaxy NGC1399. No accompanying Balmer emission lines are present in the spectrum. One possibility is that the forbidden lines emanate from X-ray illuminated debris of a star that has been tidally-disrupted by an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH), with this debris also feeding the black hole leading to the observed X-ray emission. The line strengths indicate that the minimum size of the emitting region is ~10^15 cm, and if the 70 km/s half-widths of the emission lines represent rotation around the black hole, a minimum black hole mass of 1000 solar mass is implied. The non-detection of H-alpha and H-beta emission lines suggests a white dwarf star was disrupted, although the presence of strong nitrogen emission is somewhat of a mystery.