• Radio relics at the peripheries of galaxy clusters are tracers of the elusive cluster merger shocks. We report the discovery of a single radio relic in the galaxy cluster PLCK G200.9-28.2 ($z=0.22$, $M_{500} = 2.7\pm0.2 \times 10^{14} M_{\odot}$) using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 235 and 610 MHz and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array at 1500 MHz. The relic has a size of $\sim 1 \times 0.28$ Mpc, an arc-like morphology and is located at 0.9 Mpc from the X-ray brightness peak in the cluster. The integrated spectral index of the relic is $1.21\pm0.15$. The spectral index map between 235 and 610 MHz shows steepening from the outer to the inner edge of the relic in line with the expectation from a cluster merger shock. Under the assumption of diffusive shock acceleration, the radio spectral index implies a Mach number of $3.3\pm1.8$ for the shock. The analysis of archival XMM Newton data shows that PLCK G200.9-28.2 consists of a northern brighter sub-cluster, and a southern sub-cluster in a state of merger. This cluster has the lowest mass among the clusters hosting single radio relics. The position of the Planck Sunyaev Ze'ldovich effect in this cluster is offset by 700 kpc from the X-ray peak in the direction of the radio relic, suggests a physical origin for the offset. Such large offsets in low mass clusters can be a useful tool to select disturbed clusters and to study the state of merger.
  • We investigate the occurrence of radio minihalos --- diffuse radio sources of unknown origin observed in the cores of some galaxy clusters --- in a statistical sample of 58 clusters drawn from the Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich cluster catalog using a mass cut ($M_{500}>6\times 10^{14} M_{\odot}$). We supplement our statistical sample with a similarly-sized non-statistical sample mostly consisting of clusters in the ACCEPT X-ray catalog with suitable X-ray and radio data, which includes lower-mass clusters. Where necessary (for 9 clusters), we reanalyzed the Very Large Array archival radio data to determine if a mihinalo is present. Our total sample includes all 28 currently known and recently discovered radio minihalos, including 6 candidates. We classify clusters as cool-core or non-cool core according to the value of the specific entropy floor in the cluster center, rederived or newly derived from the Chandra X-ray density and temperature profiles where necessary (for 27 clusters). Contrary to the common wisdom that minihalos are rare, we find that almost all cool cores - at least 12 out of 15 (80%) - in our complete sample of massive clusters exhibit minihalos. The supplementary sample shows that the occurrence of minihalos may be lower in lower-mass cool-core clusters. No minihalos are found in non-cool-cores or "warm cores". These findings will help test theories of the origin of minihalos and provide information on the physical processes and energetics of the cluster cores.
  • We investigate the possible presence of diffuse radio emission in the intermediate redshift, massive cluster PLCK G285.0-23.7 (z=0.39, M_500 = 8.39 x 10^(14) M_Sun). Our 16cm-band ATCA observations of PLCK G285.0-23.7 allow us to reach a rms noise level of ~11 microJy/beam on the wide-band (1.1-3.1 GHz), full-resolution (~5 arcsec) image of the cluster, making it one of the deepest ATCA images yet published. We also re-image visibilities at lower resolution in order to achieve a better sensitivity to low-surface-brightness extended radio sources. We detect one of the lowest luminosity radio halos known at z>0.35, characterised by a slight offset from the well-studied 1.4 GHz radio power vs. cluster mass correlation. Similarly to most known radio-loud clusters (i.e. those hosting diffuse non-thermal sources), PLCK G285.0-23.7 has a disturbed dynamical state. Our analysis reveals a similarly elongated X-ray and radio morphology. While the size of the radio halo in PLCK G285.0-23.7 is smaller than lower redshift radio-loud clusters in the same mass range, it shows a similar correlation with the cluster virial radius, as expected in the framework of hierarchical structure formation.
  • Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) show exceptional properties over the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Their special location at the centres of galaxy clusters raises the question of the role of the environment on their radio properties. To decouple the effect of the galaxy mass and of the environment in their statistical radio properties, we investigate the possible dependence of the occurrence of radio loudness and of the fractional radio luminosity function on the dynamical state of the hosting cluster. We studied the radio properties of the BCGs in the Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS). We obtained a statistical sample of 59 BCGs, which was divided into two classes, depending on the dynamical state of the host cluster, i.e. merging (M) and relaxed (R). Among the 59 BCGs, 28 are radio-loud, and 31 are radio--quiet. The radio-loud sources are located favourably located in relaxed clusters (71\%), while the reverse is true for the radio-quiet BCGs, mostly located in merging systems (81\%). The fractional radio luminosity function (RLF) for the BCGs is considerably higher for BCGs in relaxed clusters, where the total fraction of radio loudness reaches almost 90\%, to be compared to the $\sim$30\% in merging clusters. For relaxed clusters, we found a positive correlation between the radio power of the BCGs and the strength of the cool core, consistent with previous studies on local samples. Our study suggests that the radio loudness of the BCGs strongly depends on the cluster dynamics, their fraction being considerably higher in relaxed clusters. We compared our results with similar investigations, and briefly discussed them in the framework of AGN feedback.
  • Adding VLBI capability to the SKA arrays will greatly broaden the science of the SKA, and is feasible within the current specifications. SKA-VLBI can be initially implemented by providing phased-array outputs for SKA1-MID and SKA1-SUR and using these extremely sensitive stations with other radio telescopes, and in SKA2 by realising a distributed configuration providing baselines up to thousands of km, merging it with existing VLBI networks. The motivation for and the possible realization of SKA-VLBI is described in this paper.
  • In about 70% of the population of relaxed, cool-core galaxy clusters, the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) is radio loud, showing non-thermal radio jets and lobes ejected by the central active galactic nucleus (AGN). In recent years such relativistic plasma has been unambiguously shown to interact with the surrounding thermal intra-cluster medium (ICM) thanks to spectacular images where the lobe radio emission is observed to fill the cavities in the X-ray-emitting gas. This `radio feedback' phenomenon is widespread and is critical to understand the physics of the inner regions of galaxy clusters and the properties of the central BCG. At the same time, mechanically-powerful AGN are likely to drive turbulence in the central ICM which may also play a role for the origin of non-thermal emission on cluster-scales. Diffuse non-thermal emission has been observed in a number of cool-core clusters in the form of a radio mini-halo surrounding the radio-loud BCG on scales comparable to that of the cooling region. Large mini-halo samples are necessary to establish their origin and connection with the cluster thermal properties and dynamics, especially in light of future X-ray characterization of the cluster cores as it is expected by Athena-XIFU. We show that All-Sky reference survey at Band 2 with SKA1 at confusion limit (rms ~2 {\mu}Jy per beam) has the potential to detect up to ~620 mini-halos at redshift z<0.6, whereas Deep Tier reference surveys at Band 1/2 with SKA1 at sub-arcsec resolution (rms ~0.2 {\mu}Jy per beam) will allow a complete census of the radio-loud BCGs at any redshift down to a 1.4 GHz power of 10^{22} W/Hz. We further anticipate that SKA2 might detect up to ~1900 new mini-halos at redshift z<0.6 and characterize the radio-mode AGN feedback in every cluster and group up to redshift z ~1.7 (the highest-z where virialized clusters are currently detected).
  • We present new deep, high-resolution radio images of the diffuse minihalo in the cool core of the galaxy cluster RX J1720.1+2638. The images have been obtained with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 317, 617 and 1280 MHz and with the Very Large Array at 1.5, 4.9 and 8.4 GHz, with angular resolutions ranging from 1" to 10". This represents the best radio spectral and imaging dataset for any minihalo. Most of the radio flux of the minihalo arises from a bright central component with a maximum radius of ~80 kpc. A fainter tail of emission extends out from the central component to form a spiral-shaped structure with a length of ~230 kpc, seen at frequencies 1.5 GHz and below. We find indication of a possible steepening of the total radio spectrum of the minihalo at high frequencies. Furthermore, a spectral index image shows that the spectrum of the diffuse emission steepens with the increasing distance along the tail. A striking spatial correlation is observed between the minihalo emission and two cold fronts visible in the Chandra X-ray image of this cool core. These cold fronts confine the minihalo, as also seen in numerical simulations of minihalo formation by sloshing-induced turbulence. All these observations favor the hypothesis that the radio emitting electrons in cluster cool cores are produced by turbulent reacceleration.
  • Cool cores of some galaxy clusters exhibit faint radio "minihalos." Their origin is unclear; their study has been limited by their small number. We undertook a systematic search for minihalos in a large sample of X-ray luminous clusters with high-quality radio data. In this paper, we report four new minihalos (A 478, ZwCl 3146, RXJ 1532.9+3021 and A 2204), and five candidates, found in the reanalyzed archival Very Large Array observations. The radio luminosities of our minihalos and candidates are in the range $10^{23-25}$ W Hz$^{-1}$ at 1.4 GHz, consistent with this type of radio sources. Their sizes (40-160 kpc in radius) are somewhat smaller than those of the previously known minihalos. We combine our new detections with previously known minihalos, obtaining a total sample of 21 objects, and briefly compare the cluster radio properties to the average X-ray temperature and the total masses estimated from Planck. We find that nearly all clusters hosting minihalos are hot and massive. Beyond that, there is no clear correlation between the minihalo radio power and cluster temperature or mass (in contrast with the giant radio halos found in cluster mergers, whose radio luminosity correlates with the cluster mass). Chandra X-ray images indicate gas sloshing in the cool cores of most of our clusters, with minihalos contained within the sloshing regions in many of them. This supports the hypothesis that radio-emitting electrons are reaccelerated by sloshing. Advection of relativistic electrons by the sloshing gas may also play a role in the formation of the less-extended minihalos.
  • We report the discovery of a giant radio halo in a new, hot, X-ray luminous galaxy cluster recently found by Planck, PLCKG171.9-40.7. The radio halo was found using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations at 235 MHz and 610 MHz, and in the 1.4 GHz data from a NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey pointing that we have reanalyzed. The diffuse radio emission is coincident with the cluster X-ray emission, has an extent of ~1 Mpc and a radio power of ~5x 10^24 W/Hz at 1.4 GHz. Its integrated radio spectrum has a slope of alpha~1.8 between 235 MHz and 1.4 GHz, steeper than that of a typical giant halo. The analysis of the archival XMM-Newton X-ray data shows that the cluster is hot (~10 keV) and disturbed, consistent with X-ray selected clusters hosting radio halos. This is the first giant radio halo discovered in one of the new clusters found by Planck.
  • We performed GMRT low frequency observations of the radio halos, relics and new candidates belonging to the GMRT Radio Halo Cluster Sample first observed at 610 MHz. High sensitivity imaging was performed using the GMRT at 325 MHz and 240 MHz. The properties of the diffuse emission in each cluster were compared to our 610 MHz images and/or literature information available at other frequencies, in order to derive the integrated spectra over a wide frequency range.Beyond the classical radio halos, whose spectral index $\alpha$ is in the range $\sim1.2\div1.3$ (S$\propto\nu^{-\alpha}$), we found sources with $\alpha\sim1.6\div1.9$. This result supports the idea that the spectra of the radiating particles in radio halos is not universal, and that inefficient mechanisms of particle acceleration are responsible for their origin. We also found a variety of brightness distributions, i.e. centrally peaked as well as clumpy halos. Even though the thermal and relativistic plasma tend to occupy the same cluster volume, in some cases a positional shift between the radio and X-ray peaks of emission is evident. Our observations also revealed the existence of diffuse cluster sources which cannot be easily classified either as halos or relics. New candidate relics were found in A1300 and in A1682, and in some clusters "bridges" of radio emission have been detected, connecting the relic and radio halo emission. Combining our new data with literature information, we derived the LogL$_{\rm X}$-LogP$_{\rm 325 MHz}$ correlation for radio halos, and investigated the possible trend of the spectral index of radio halos with the temperature of the intracluster medium.
  • We present deep Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) radio observations at 240, 330 and 610 MHz of the complex radio source at the center of the NGC1407 galaxy group. Previous GMRT observations at 240 MHz revealed faint, diffuse emission enclosing the central twin-jet radio galaxy. This has been interpreted as an indication of two possible radio outbursts occurring at different times. Both the inner double and diffuse component are detected in the new GMRT images at high levels of significance. Combining the GMRT observations with archival Very Large Array data at 1.4 and 4.9 GHz, we derive the total spectrum of both components. The inner double has a spectral index \alpha=0.7, typical for active, extended radio galaxies, whereas the spectrum of the large-scale emission is very steep, with \alpha=1.8 between 240 MHz and 1.4 GHz. The radiative age of the large-scale component is very long, ~300 Myr, compared to ~30 Myr estimated for the central double, confirming that the diffuse component was generated during a former cycle of activity of the central galaxy. The current activity have so far released an energy which is nearly one order of magnitude lower than that associated with the former outburst. The group X-ray emission in the Chandra and XMM-Newton images and extended radio emission show a similar swept-back morphology. We speculate that the two structures are both affected by the motion of the group core, perhaps due to the core sloshing in response to a recent encounter with the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC1400.
  • IRAS 09104+4109 is a rare example of a dust enshrouded type 2 QSO in the centre of a cool-core galaxy cluster. Previous observations of this z=0.44 system showed that as well as powering the hyper-luminous infrared emission of the cluster-central galaxy, the QSO is associated with a double-lobed radio source. However, the steep radio spectral index and misalignment between the jets and ionised optical emission suggested that the orientation of the QSO had recently changed. We use a combination of new, multi-band Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations and archival radio data to confirm that the jets are no longer powered by the QSO, and estimate their age to be 120-160 Myr. This is in agreement with the ~70-200 Myr age previously estimated for star-formation in the galaxy. Previously unpublished Very Long Baseline Array data reveal a 200 pc scale double radio source in the galaxy core which is more closely aligned with the current QSO axis and may represent a more recent period of jet activity. These results suggest that the realignment of the QSO, the cessation of jet activity, and the onset of rapid star-formation may have been caused by a gas-rich galaxy merger. A Chandra X-ray observation confirms the presence of cavities associated with the radio jets, and we estimate the energy required to inflate them to be ~7.7x10^60 erg. The mechanical power of the jets is sufficient to balance radiative cooling in the cluster, provided they are efficiently coupled to the intra-cluster medium (ICM). We find no evidence of direct radiative heating and conclude that the QSO either lacks the radiative luminosity to heat the ICM, or that it requires longer than 100-200 Myr to significantly impact its environment. [Abridged]
  • We report the discovery of a giant radio halo in the galaxy cluster RXC J1514.9-1523 at z=0.22 with a relatively low X-ray luminosity, $L_{X \, [0.1-2.4 \rm \, kev]} \sim 7 \times 10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. This faint, diffuse radio source is detected with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 327 MHz. The source is barely detected at 1.4 GHz in a NVSS pointing that we have reanalyzed. The integrated radio spectrum of the halo is quite steep, with a slope \alpha = 1.6 between 327 MHz and 1.4 GHz. While giant radio halos are common in more X-ray luminous cluster mergers, there is a less than 10% probability to detect a halo in systems with $L_X \ltsim 8 \times 10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. The detection of a new giant halo in this borderline luminosity regime can be particularly useful for discriminating between the competing theories for the origin of ultrarelativistic electrons in clusters. Furthermore, if our steep radio spectral index is confirmed by future deeper radio observations, this cluster would provide another example of the recently discovered population of ultra-steep spectrum radio halos, predicted by the model in which the cluster cosmic ray electrons are produced by turbulent reacceleration.
  • We present new Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations at 235 MHz and 610 MHz of 18 X-ray bright galaxy groups. These observations are part of an extended project, presented here and in future papers, which combines low-frequency radio and X-ray data to investigate the interaction between central active galactic nuclei (AGN) and the intra-group medium (IGM). The radio images show a very diverse population of group-central radio sources, varying widely in size, power, morphology and spectral index. Comparison of the radio images with Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray images shows that groups with significant substructure in the X-ray band and marginal radio emission at >= 1 GHz host low-frequency radio structures that correlate with substructures in IGM. Radio-filled X-ray cavities, the most evident form of AGN/IGM interaction in our sample, are found in half of the systems, and are typically associated with small, low- or mid-power double radio sources. Two systems, NGC5044 and NGC4636, possess multiple cavities, which are isotropically distributed around the group center, possibly due to group weather. In other systems the radio/X-ray correlations are less evident. However, the AGN/IGM interaction can manifest itself through the effects of the high-pressure medium on the morphology, spectral properties and evolution of the radio-emitting plasma. In particular, the IGM can confine fading radio lobes in old/dying radio galaxies and prevent them from dissipating quickly. Evidence for radio emission produced by former outbursts that coexist with current activity is found in six groups of the sample.
  • Diffuse radio sources in galaxy clusters are unique signposts of cluster assembly in the Universe. Our knowledge of their observational properties has considerably improved over the past decade, and the long standing questions concerning their origin and rarity are now starting to receive some answers. It is nowadays fairly well established that massive cluster mergers are the key ingredient to account for the origin of halos and relics. The increasing number of halos and relics found now allow to derive significant statistical correlations. It has been shown that galaxy clusters may be radio-loud or radio--quiet with respect to the presence of radio halos. Morevoer, radio halos and relics are present only in unrelaxed clusters, whereas no such sources have ever been found in relaxed systems. It has also become clear that a large distribution exists for the spectral index of the synchrotron spectrum of radio halos, and ultra-steep halos have been found. Despite all this, a number of observational issues remain open. Well defined radio spectra, from ~ hundred MHz to GHz frequencies and good spectral imaging are available only for few halos and relics, and such information is crucial for a detailed understanding of their origin. It is presently unclear if there are basic differences between clusters with ultra steep spectrum radio halos and those hosting "classical" ones, and it is unknown if less energetic mergers result in an observational signature in the radio band. With the forthcoming advent of LOFAR and of the SKA Pathfinders, we will soon be able to observe galaxy clusters with a major improvement in the radio sensitivity and frequency coverage, and we expect to be able to soon address some of these pressing questions.
  • Angelo Antonelli, Vincenzo Antonuccio-Delogu, Andrea Baruffolo, Stefano Benetti, Simone Bianchi, Andrea Biviano, Annalisa Bonafede, Marco Bondi, Stefano Borgani, Angela Bragaglia, Massimo Brescia, John Robert Brucato, Gianfranco Brunetti, Riccardo Brunino, Michele Cantiello, Viviana Casasola, Rossella Cassano, Alberto Cellino, Gabriele Cescutti, Andrea Cimatti, Andrea Comastri, Edvige Corbelli, Giovanni Cresci, Serena Criscuoli, Stefano Cristiani, Guido Cupani, Sabrina De Grandi, Valerio D'Elia, Melania Del Santo, Gabriella De Lucia, Silvano Desidera, Marcella Di Criscienzo, Valentina D'Odorico, Elisabetta Dotto, Fabio Fontanot, Mario Gai, Simona Gallerani, Stefano Gallozzi, Bianca Garilli, Isabella Gioia, Marisa Girardi, Myriam Gitti, Gianluigi Granato, Raffaele Gratton, Andrea Grazian, Carlotta Gruppioni, Leslie Hunt, Giuseppe Leto, Gianluca Israel, Manuela Magliocchetti, Laura Magrini, Gabriele Mainetti, Filippo Mannucci, Alessandro Marconi, Martino Marelli, Michele Maris, Francesca Matteucci, Massimo Meneghetti, Aniello Mennella, Amata Mercurio, Silvano Molendi, Pierluigi Monaco, Alessia Moretti, Giuseppe Murante, Fabrizio Nicastro, Marina Orio, Adamantia Paizis, Francesca Panessa, Fabio Pasian, Laura Pentericci, Lucia Pozzetti, Mariachiara Rossetti, Joana S. Santos, Alexandro Saro, Raffaella Schneider, Laura Silva, Roberto Silvotti, Richard Smart, Andrea Tiengo, Luca Tornatore, Paolo Tozzi, Edoardo Trussoni, Tiziano Valentinuzzi, Eros Vanzella, Franco Vazza, Alberto Vecchiato, Tiziana Venturi, Giacomo Vianello, Matteo Viel, Alvaro Villalobos, Valentina Viotto, Benedetta Vulcani
    July 8, 2010 astro-ph.IM
    On May 27th 2010, the Italian astronomical community learned with concern that the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) was going to be suppressed, and that its employees were going to be transferred to the National Research Council (CNR). It was not clear if this applied to all employees (i.e. also to researchers hired on short-term contracts), and how this was going to happen in practice. In this letter, we give a brief historical overview of INAF and present a short chronicle of the few eventful days that followed. Starting from this example, we then comment on the current situation and prospects of astronomical research in Italy.
  • In this paper we present a detailed study of the giant radio halo in the galaxy cluster Abell 697, with the aim to constrain its origin and connection with the cluster dynamics. We performed high sensitivity GMRT observations at 325 MHz, which showed that the radio halo is much brighter and larger at this frequency, compared to previous 610 MHz observations. In order to derive the integrated spectrum in the frequency range 325 MHz--1.4 GHz, we re--analysed archival VLA data at 1.4 GHz and made use of proprietary GMRT data at 610 MHz. {Our multifrequency analysis shows that the total radio spectrum of the giant radio halo in A\,697 is very steep, with $\alpha_{\rm~325 MHz}^{\rm~1.4 GHz} \approx 1.7-1.8$. %\pm0.1$. Due to energy arguments, a hadronic origin of the halo is disfavoured by such steep spectrum. Very steep spectrum halos in merging clusters are predicted in the case that the emitting electrons are accelerated by turbulence, observations with the upcoming low frequency arrays will be able to test these expectations.}
  • The measurement of proper motions in CSOs is a powerful tool to determine the dynamical evolution of the newly born extragalactic radio sources. We observed 3 CSOs with the VLBA in 2004 and in 2006 to monitor changes in their structure and measure the separation velocity of the hot spots. It is important to increase the size of the samples of CSOs with measured expansion velocity to test the existance of frustrated objects, and put stringent constraints on the current models. We found for all the three objects observed a transverse motion of the hotspots, and we suggest as the more likey explanation a precession in the jet axis. This behaviour likely inhibits or at least slows down the radio source growth because the head of the hotspot continuously hits new regions of the ISM. Therefore these radio sources may represent an old population of GPS/CSOs.
  • We present new multi-frequency EVN, MERLIN and VLA observations of the radio source 3C264, sensitive to linear scales ranging from the parsec to several kiloparsecs. The observations confirm the existence of regions with different properties in the first kiloparsec of the jet. The most remarkable feature is the transition between a well collimated narrow jet at distances from the core below 80 pc, to a conical-shaped wide jet, with an opening angle of 20 degrees. Another change of properties, consisting of an apparent deflection of the jet ridge line and a diminution of the surface brightness, occurs at a distance of 300 pc from the core, coincident with the radius of a ring observed at optical wavelengths. Our observations add new pieces of information on the spectrum of the radio-optical jet of 3C264, with results consistent with a synchrotron emission mechanism and a spectrum break frequency in the infrared. Brightness profiles taken perpendicularly to the jet of 3C264 are consistent with a spine brightened jet at distances below 100 pc from the core, and an edge-brightened jet beyond, which can be interpreted as evidence of a transverse jet velocity structure. Our observations do not allow us to distinguish between the presence of a face--on dust and gas disk at the center of the host galaxy of 3C264, or rather an evacuated bubble. However, the properties of the jet structure, the changes in the polarization angle, and the plausible jet orientation can be naturally brought into agreement in the bubble scenario.