• Count data and recurrent events in clinical trials, such as the number of lesions in magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis, the number of relapses in multiple sclerosis, the number of hospitalizations in heart failure, and the number of exacerbations in asthma or in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are often modeled by negative binomial distributions. In this manuscript we study planning and analyzing clinical trials with group sequential designs for negative binomial outcomes. We propose a group sequential testing procedure for negative binomial outcomes based on Wald statistics using maximum likelihood estimators. The asymptotic distribution of the proposed group sequential tests statistics are derived. The finite sample size properties of the proposed group sequential test for negative binomial outcomes and the methods for planning the respective clinical trials are assessed in a simulation study. The simulation scenarios are motivated by clinical trials in chronic heart failure and relapsing multiple sclerosis, which cover a wide range of practically relevant settings. Our research assures that the asymptotic normal theory of group sequential designs can be applied to negative binomial outcomes when the hypotheses are tested using Wald statistics and maximum likelihood estimators. We also propose two methods, one based on Student's t-distribution and one based on resampling, to improve type I error rate control in small samples. The statistical methods studied in this manuscript are implemented in the R package \textit{gscounts}, which is available for download on the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN).
  • Prior information is often incorporated informally when planning a clinical trial. Here, we present an approach on how to incorporate prior information, such as data from historical clinical trials, into the nuisance parameter based sample size re-estimation in a design with an internal pilot study. We focus on trials with continuous endpoints in which the outcome variance is the nuisance parameter. For planning and analyzing the trial frequentist methods are considered. Moreover, the external information on the variance is summarized by the Bayesian meta-analytic-predictive (MAP) approach. To incorporate external information into the sample size re-estimation, we propose to update the MAP prior based on the results of the internal pilot study and to re-estimate the sample size using an estimator from the posterior. By means of a simulation study, we compare the operating characteristics such as power and sample size distribution of the proposed procedure with the traditional sample size re-estimation approach which uses the pooled variance estimator. The simulation study shows that, if no prior-data conflict is present, incorporating external information into the sample size re-estimation improves the operating characteristics compared to the traditional approach. In the case of a prior-data conflict, that is when the variance of the ongoing clinical trial is unequal to the prior location, the performance of the traditional sample size re-estimation procedure is in general superior, even when the prior information is robustified. When considering to include prior information in sample size re-estimation, the potential gains should be balanced against the risks.
  • The sample size of a clinical trial relies on information about nuisance parameters such as the outcome variance. When no or only limited information is available, it has been proposed to include an internal pilot study in the design of the trial. Based on the results of the internal pilot study, the initially planned sample size can be adjusted. In this paper, we study blinded sample size re-estimation in the 'gold standard' design for normally distributed outcomes. The 'gold standard' design is a three-arm clinical trial design which includes an active and a placebo control in addition to an experimental treatment. We compare several sample size re-estimation procedures in a simulation study assessing operating characteristics including power and type I error. We find that sample size re-estimation based on the popular one-sample variance estimator results in overpowered trials. Moreover, sample size re-estimation based on unbiased variance estimators such as the Xing-Ganju variance estimator results in underpowered trials, as it is expected since an overestimation of the variance and thus the sample size is in general required for the re-estimation procedure to eventually meet the target power. Moreover, we propose an inflation factor for the sample size re-estimation with the Xing-Ganju variance estimator and show that this approach results in adequately powered trials. Due to favorable features of Xing-Ganju variance estimator such as unbiasedness and a distribution independent of the group means, the inflation factor does not depend on the nuisance parameter and, therefore, can be calculated prior to a trial.
  • The 'gold standard' design for three-arm trials refers to trials with an active control and a placebo control in addition to the experimental treatment group. This trial design is recommended when being ethically justifiable and it allows the simultaneous comparison of experimental treatment, active control, and placebo. Parametric testing methods have been studied plentifully over the past years. However, these methods often tend to be liberal or conservative when distributional assumptions are not met particularly with small sample sizes. In this article, we introduce a studentized permutation test for testing non-inferiority and superiority of the experimental treatment compared to the active control in three-arm trials in the `gold standard' design. The performance of the studentized permutation test for finite sample sizes is assessed in a Monte-Carlo simulation study under various parameter constellations. Emphasis is put on whether the studentized permutation test meets the target significance level. For comparison purposes, commonly used Wald-type tests are included in the simulation study. The simulation study shows that the presented studentized permutation test for assessing non-inferiority in three-arm trials in the 'gold standard' design outperforms its competitors for count data. The methods discussed in this paper are implemented in the R package ThreeArmedTrials which is available on the comprehensive R archive network (CRAN).