• We introduce a new family of quantum circuits in Continuous Variables and we show that, relying on the widely accepted conjecture that the polynomial hierarchy of complexity classes does not collapse, their output probability distribution cannot be efficiently simulated by a classical computer. These circuits are composed of input photon-subtracted (or photon-added) squeezed states, passive linear optics evolution, and eight-port homodyne detection. We address the proof of hardness for the exact probability distribution of these quantum circuits by exploiting mappings onto different architectures of sub-universal quantum computers. We obtain both a worst-case and an average-case hardness result. Hardness of Boson Sampling with eight-port homodyne detection is obtained as the zero squeezing limit of our model. We conclude with a discussion on the relevance and interest of the present model in connection to experimental applications and classical simulations.
  • We present a theoretical proposal to couple a single Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) center to a superconducting flux qubit (FQ) in the regime where both systems are off resonance. The coupling between both quantum devices is achieved through the strong driving of the flux qubit by a classical microwave field that creates dressed states with an experimentally controlled characteristic frequency. We discuss several applications such as controlling the NV center's state by manipulation of the flux qubit, performing the NV center full tomography and using the NV center as a quantum memory. The effect of decoherence and its consequences to the proposed applications are also analyzed. Our results provide a theoretical framework describing a promising hybrid system for quantum information processing, which combines the advantages of fast manipulation and long coherence times.
  • We provide a toolbox for continuous variables quantum state engineering and characterization of biphoton states produced by spontaneous parametric down conversion in a transverse pump configuration. We show that the control of the pump beam's incidence spot and angle corresponds to phase space displacements of conjugate collective continuous variables of the biphoton. In particular, we illustrate with numerical simulations on a semiconductor device how this technique can be used to engineer and characterize arbitrary states of the frequency and time degrees of freedom.
  • The Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) experiment was a benchmark in quantum optics, evidencing the quantum nature of the photon. In order to go deeper, and obtain the complete information about the quantum state of a system, for instance, composed by photons, the direct measurement or reconstruction of the Wigner function or other quasi--probability distribution in phase space is necessary. In the present paper, we show that a simple modification in the well-known HOM experiment provides the direct measurement of the Wigner function. We apply our results to a widely used quantum optics system, consisting of the biphoton generated in the parametric down conversion process. In this approach, a negative value of the Wigner function is a sufficient condition for non-gaussian entanglement between two photons. In the general case, the Wigner function provides all the required information to infer entanglement using well known necessary and sufficient criteria. We analyze our results using two examples of parametric down conversion processes taken from recent experiments. The present work offers a new vision of the HOM experiment that further develops its possibilities to realize fundamental tests of quantum mechanics involving decoherence and entanglement using simple optical set-ups.
  • We attempt to estimate the uncertainty in the constraints on the spin independent dark matter-nucleon cross section due to our lack of knowledge of the dark matter phase space in the galaxy. We fit the density of dark matter before investigating the possible solutions of the Jeans equation compatible with those fits in order to understand what velocity dispersions we might expect at the solar radius. We take into account the possibility of non-Maxwellian velocity distributions and the possible presence of a dark disk. Combining all these effects, we still find that the uncertainty in the interpretation of direct detection experiments for high (>100 GeV) mass dark matter candidates is less than an order of magnitude in cross section.